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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Astronomy & Celestial Talk
Thread started 01 Aug 2017 (Tuesday) 13:58
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Solar Binoculars

 
Inspeqtor
Chuckmeister? Really people??
Inspeqtor's Avatar
Joined Mar 2008
Elkhart, Indiana
Aug 01, 2017 13:58 |  #1

I just found online Celestron Eclipse Binoculars for view the eclipse, or just viewing the sun! Cool!

https://www.amazon.com ...art+10x42+solar+bin​ocular (external link)

They also have:

https://www.amazon.com ...art+10x25+solar+bin​ocular (external link)

Correct me if I am wrong, the 1st number is the amount of magnification.
The 2nd number is the lens diameter, the larger the number the larger the lens letting in more light also then giving you a better view.

I ordered the 10X42 Binoculars


Charles
Canon EOS 60D Gripped * Canon EOS XSi * Flickr Account (external link)
Tokina AT-X Pro DX 11-20 f/2.8 * Sigma 17-70 f2.8-4 DC Macro OS * Sigma 150-500 f5-6.3 APO DG OS HSM
Canon 18-55 IS Kit Lens * Canon 70-300 IS USM * Canon 50mm f1.8 * Canon 580EX II *** iOptron 3302W Star Tracker

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TCampbell
Senior Member
Joined Apr 2012
Aug 01, 2017 14:39 |  #2

Inspeqtor wrote in post #18416486 (external link)
I just found online Celestron Eclipse Binoculars for view the eclipse, or just viewing the sun! Cool!


Correct me if I am wrong, the 1st number is the amount of magnification.
The 2nd number is the lens diameter, the larger the number the larger the lens letting in more light also then giving you a better view.

I ordered the 10X42 Binoculars

Yes and yes (on the meaning of the first and second number). Larger aperture optics also have the ability to resolve finer detail. We are approaching solar minimum so lately there have been fewer visible sunspots.

Light gathering isn't really an issue for the Sun (it's mostly all about light blocking). A consideration for binoculars is weight. Your arms will get tired holding them in front of your eyes for long periods of time. Many binoculars have a standard tripod bolt socket ... but it's usually on the front (at the hinge point - often covered by a plastic cap). You can get a very inexpensive "L" bracket which allows the binoculars to be mounted on any standard tripod or monopod with a 1/4" 20 tpi mounting screw (the standard size).




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Inspeqtor
THREAD ­ STARTER
Chuckmeister? Really people??
Inspeqtor's Avatar
Joined Mar 2008
Elkhart, Indiana
Aug 02, 2017 00:17 |  #3

TCampbell wrote in post #18416522 (external link)
Inspeqtor wrote in post #18416486 (external link)
I just found online Celestron Eclipse Binoculars for view the eclipse, or just viewing the sun! Cool!


Correct me if I am wrong, the 1st number is the amount of magnification.
The 2nd number is the lens diameter, the larger the number the larger the lens letting in more light also then giving you a better view.

I ordered the 10X42 Binoculars

Yes and yes (on the meaning of the first and second number). Larger aperture optics also have the ability to resolve finer detail. We are approaching solar minimum so lately there have been fewer visible sunspots.

Light gathering isn't really an issue for the Sun (it's mostly all about light blocking). A consideration for binoculars is weight. Your arms will get tired holding them in front of your eyes for long periods of time. Many binoculars have a standard tripod bolt socket ... but it's usually on the front (at the hinge point - often covered by a plastic cap). You can get a very inexpensive "L" bracket which allows the binoculars to be mounted on any standard tripod or monopod with a 1/4" 20 tpi mounting screw (the standard size).

I noticed this last week while taking practice shots of the sun for the upcoming eclipse, the sun spots were not there, but I had no idea why. Do you know how long it will be before they return?

I had thought about the sun being our only light source that light from the sun would not be a problem :)

I have a Nikon Binocular that has a tripod L-Bracket. I have no idea if the Celestron will have that or not. I would think to hand hold the binocular tight to your eyes would be safer for looking at the sun than having the binocular bolted to a tripod or monopod.


Charles
Canon EOS 60D Gripped * Canon EOS XSi * Flickr Account (external link)
Tokina AT-X Pro DX 11-20 f/2.8 * Sigma 17-70 f2.8-4 DC Macro OS * Sigma 150-500 f5-6.3 APO DG OS HSM
Canon 18-55 IS Kit Lens * Canon 70-300 IS USM * Canon 50mm f1.8 * Canon 580EX II *** iOptron 3302W Star Tracker

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rosh4u
Member
44 posts
Joined Jun 2017
Surat, India
Aug 02, 2017 00:27 |  #4

TCampbell wrote in post #18416522 (external link)
Yes and yes (on the meaning of the first and second number). Larger aperture optics also have the ability to resolve finer detail. We are approaching solar minimum so lately there have been fewer visible sunspots.

Light gathering isn't really an issue for the Sun (it's mostly all about light blocking). A consideration for binoculars is weight. Your arms will get tired holding them in front of your eyes for long periods of time. Many binoculars have a standard tripod bolt socket ... but it's usually on the front (at the hinge point - often covered by a plastic cap). You can get a very inexpensive "L" bracket which allows the binoculars to be mounted on any standard tripod or monopod with a 1/4" 20 tpi mounting screw (the standard size).

Yes, agreed with a comment. :):-)




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TCampbell
Senior Member
Joined Apr 2012
Aug 02, 2017 08:05 |  #5

Inspeqtor wrote in post #18417042 (external link)
I noticed this last week while taking practice shots of the sun for the upcoming eclipse, the sun spots were not there, but I had no idea why. Do you know how long it will be before they return?

The Sun takes about 25.4 days (a little shy of a month) to do a complete rotation. The equator spins a bit faster than the poles (btw, that 25.4 number is the rate of spin at the equator) and the most activity tends to be near the equator.

You can check out websites like spaceweather.com and spaceweather.live to check for sunspots.

There is a previously established "Active Region" (AR) spinning into view now. (AR2665). It's just on the eastern side at the very edge.




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Inspeqtor
THREAD ­ STARTER
Chuckmeister? Really people??
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Joined Mar 2008
Elkhart, Indiana
Aug 02, 2017 09:28 |  #6

TCampbell wrote in post #18417205 (external link)
The Sun takes about 25.4 days (a little shy of a month) to do a complete rotation. The equator spins a bit faster than the poles (btw, that 25.4 number is the rate of spin at the equator) and the most activity tends to be near the equator.

You can check out websites like spaceweather.com and spaceweather.live to check for sunspots.

There is a previously established "Active Region" (AR) spinning into view now. (AR2665). It's just on the eastern side at the very edge.

Thank you. There is a lot about astronomy I do not know, for instance I was unaware the sun actually rotated!

From what you are saying then within every month there are periods of time we should see sun spots, and within every month there are periods of time we will not see sun spots.

25.4 will be an easy number to remember because there are 25.4 millimeters in an inch. I work with both millimeters and inches everyday.

Thank you also for the website information.


Charles
Canon EOS 60D Gripped * Canon EOS XSi * Flickr Account (external link)
Tokina AT-X Pro DX 11-20 f/2.8 * Sigma 17-70 f2.8-4 DC Macro OS * Sigma 150-500 f5-6.3 APO DG OS HSM
Canon 18-55 IS Kit Lens * Canon 70-300 IS USM * Canon 50mm f1.8 * Canon 580EX II *** iOptron 3302W Star Tracker

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Inspeqtor
THREAD ­ STARTER
Chuckmeister? Really people??
Inspeqtor's Avatar
Joined Mar 2008
Elkhart, Indiana
Aug 05, 2017 15:00 |  #7

I got my Binoculars yesterday! I checked Amazon, they are now sold out of both sizes. I must have gotten one of the last ones, if not the very last one in stock.

I used it for the first time between the cloud coverings.... I was hoping to see the orange color of the sun like I get from my Thousand Oaks filter for my camera lens, but it is the silver or grey color.

Still better than not being able to see the sun/eclipse at all!

I will be able to get some good pictures to be able to keep with my Thousand Oaks filter!


Charles
Canon EOS 60D Gripped * Canon EOS XSi * Flickr Account (external link)
Tokina AT-X Pro DX 11-20 f/2.8 * Sigma 17-70 f2.8-4 DC Macro OS * Sigma 150-500 f5-6.3 APO DG OS HSM
Canon 18-55 IS Kit Lens * Canon 70-300 IS USM * Canon 50mm f1.8 * Canon 580EX II *** iOptron 3302W Star Tracker

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spotz04
Goldmember
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Joined Mar 2010
Local Yocal, USA
Aug 15, 2017 00:30 |  #8

I captured sunspots on Aug 4th using the Thousand Oaks on my lens and again on the 9th. I think it was on the 3rd, when I started to test the Thousand Oaks filter, I didn't capture any sunspots. On the 4th I thought my camera sensor was dirty, haha :-P so I confirmed the spots at NASA's todays sunspot site. Both were in the same region, labeled 2670 on the website. The Aug 4th had 2 spots, one big & one very small located lower left-- but only the big spot on the 9th, located on the right side of the sun. NASA's site--
https://sohowww.nascom​.nasa.gov/sunspots/ (external link)

I have an extra 8x8 sheet of the solar film that I'm thinking about using to make binocular filters. I'm still chewing on the idea.

I read online the sun is in its 11 year cycle of low activity, so there will be times of no sunspots. Also read it's possible the corona during totality won't be as big due to the current cycle. I suppose we'll know soon enough.




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Solar Binoculars
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