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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Astronomy & Celestial
Thread started 18 Aug 2017 (Friday) 20:49
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Safe to use Eclipse Glasses for lens filter?

 
kezug
Senior Member
Joined Mar 2010
N.W. Indiana
Aug 18, 2017 20:49 |  #1

Please tell me if this is safe or not...I will be using live view and with tape on the view finder. I will only view this via the camera screen to establish composition and focus.

These are legit ISO certified glasses for this 2017 eclipse. These came from the NASA booth at Oskosh airshow:

Shot with Canon 70D - 55-250mm STM

I want to do the whole shoot using SeTnC, but the filter that someone sent me in the mail just didnt look opaque enough..it had small scratches and a couple of small tiny pin holes. It looks solid but when holding it up to a flashlight, I could see what appeared to be defects. Perhaps from being older or compressed too tightly in the tissue sandwich.

Here is my setup...safe for all the duration of partial before and after?

Sorry for posting this as my own thread after posting in another but I wanted to get the visibility as I need to make sure this is safe or not.

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Camera's: 70D, G12 | Len's: 18-135mm IS STM, 55-250mm IS STM, 50mm f/1.8 II | Photos:flickr (external link)

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MalVeauX
"Looks rough and well used"
MalVeauX's Avatar
Joined Feb 2013
Florida
Aug 18, 2017 21:04 |  #2

Yes, it's fine.

Camera sensors are not inherently destroyed by UV & IR wavelengths which is what your solar film filter there is primarily blocking that matters (the portion that simply darkens it down just makes you able to see it). A camera sensor can take UV & IR all day. Your eye cannot take UV. Your eye can take IR to an extent, but the problem is heat and IR and heat go hand in hand. Your filters is blocking both, and dropping brightness, so it's safe for your eyes. It's overkill for your sensor. You'll find there are two films, visual grade and imaging grade, and imaging grade is significantly different. I have lots of filters that are safe for sensors, but not safe for eyes.

Very best,


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kezug
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
Joined Mar 2010
N.W. Indiana
Post has been last edited 3 months ago by kezug. 5 edits done in total.
Aug 18, 2017 21:17 |  #3

MalVeauX wrote in post #18431366 (external link)
Yes, it's fine.

Camera sensors are not inherently destroyed by UV & IR wavelengths which is what your solar film filter there is primarily blocking that matters (the portion that simply darkens it down just makes you able to see it). A camera sensor can take UV & IR all day. Your eye cannot take UV. Your eye can take IR to an extent, but the problem is heat and IR and heat go hand in hand. Your filters is blocking both, and dropping brightness, so it's safe for your eyes. It's overkill for your sensor. You'll find there are two films, visual grade and imaging grade, and imaging grade is significantly different. I have lots of filters that are safe for sensors, but not safe for eyes.

Very best,

Thanks! Coming from you, who visits the sun often :), makes me feel good about using it.

MalVeauX, this is the filter I received. I got it from a family member, who chases totalities, who used to shoot a lot but on film. He says it is 3-4 years old but doesnt have any specifications on it. I feel safe using it from this person, but when I inspected it, I saw the following (see pics below). Pic 1 has a flashlight behind filter. Pic 2 is without light behind filter.

Also, I have never held/seen solar filter before so I dont know what to expect with this material. Is this material considered damaged and I should NOT use it?
What about doubling it up, or is that cutting out too much light?

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Camera's: 70D, G12 | Len's: 18-135mm IS STM, 55-250mm IS STM, 50mm f/1.8 II | Photos:flickr (external link)

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MalVeauX
"Looks rough and well used"
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Joined Feb 2013
Florida
Aug 18, 2017 21:25 |  #4

Heya,

It's probably fine for a camera sensor. But if you're at all in doubt, just don't use it. Don't use it for visual. Most film does develop small holes and imperfections over time. But it's actually quite durable. Film is a lot like a weird tin foil vinyl to try to put words to it. It's still better than glass. I'd strap that to a camera sensor of mine without hesitation. As long as it blocks IR, it's fine. I use far less dense filtration for imaging, super unsafe for eyes, but totally fine for camera sensors. When it comes to solar, transmission is king, and the reality is, the brightness is not an issue either (usually just too bright for the shutter speed & fast focal ratios of typical camera stuff), the issue is basically all on the side of IR (heat) in regards to camera senors. Sensors are much, much more tolerable of this stuff than people understand, but visually, the stuff can be super not safe for eyeballs. So typically the sensor gets dropped into the same category for safety purposes; but, that's not the reality of it.

Again, I'd use it for a camera sensor (zero visual use), but if you're not comfortable, then don't use it.

Very best,


My Flickr (external link) :: My Astrobin (external link) :: Canon 17-40L For Sale! $380!

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Celestron
Cream of the Crop
8,414 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Joined Jun 2007
Texas USA
Aug 18, 2017 22:49 as a reply to kezug's post |  #5

Me personally that first image looks like the protective cover is disenagrating and allowing light to pass through the holes . Personally I wouldn't use it especially for viewing . Try taking a few Picts with it now and see if any light spots show on your image .




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Safe to use Eclipse Glasses for lens filter?
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