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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Astronomy & Celestial Talk
Thread started 18 Aug 2017 (Friday) 10:44
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ND instead of solar

 
bamatt
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Aug 18, 2017 10:44 |  #1

Can I use my variable ND filter at its darkest setting without jacking up my camera?

I have some solar film, but was just curious.

Thanks!


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Celestron
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Aug 18, 2017 11:01 |  #2

bamatt wrote in post #18430912 (external link)
Can I use my variable ND filter at its darkest setting without jacking up my camera?

I have some solar film, but was just curious.

Thanks!


There has been numerous discussions here about ND filters . Most answers are not for solar imaging . They do not block the harmful UV rays that damage eyes and sensors . NASA says a #12 or higher welders glass is safe but they also say #14 is best . If you have solar film use it .




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MalVeauX
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Aug 18, 2017 12:05 |  #3

bamatt wrote in post #18430912 (external link)
Can I use my variable ND filter at its darkest setting without jacking up my camera?

I have some solar film, but was just curious.

Thanks!

UV doesn't bother a camera sensor.
IR just heats things up, but otherwise isn't a problem for the sensor.
If you're using small aperture lenses and long focal ratios with a ND filter you can take shots at the sun, no problem.
But don't use it for VISUAL through the filter as the UV to your retinas is a bad idea. Your sensor doesn't care though.

Very best,


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Celestron
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Aug 18, 2017 12:10 as a reply to MalVeauX's post |  #4

You should emphasize "Small Lens" . With a zoom lens it's not safe in larger lens .




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docholliday_sc001
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Aug 18, 2017 13:21 as a reply to Celestron's post |  #5

I've used a vari ND with a hot mirror in front of it...the B+W UV/IR cut works too.




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Celestron
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Aug 18, 2017 14:16 |  #6

docholliday_sc001 wrote in post #18431026 (external link)
I've used a vari ND with a hot mirror in front of it...the B+W UV/IR cut works too.


If you are planning to capture the Corona of the sun during totality you need to remove all filters cause they might cause you to loose some detail .




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docholliday_sc001
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Aug 18, 2017 19:37 |  #7

Celestron wrote in post #18431063 (external link)
If you are planning to capture the Corona of the sun during totality you need to remove all filters cause they might cause you to loose some detail .

I'm not shooting the eclipse through this setup, but rather through my telescope. This was my lightweight setup for some general imaging I did previously.




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MizzouMan_2000
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Aug 18, 2017 23:29 |  #8

I bought a variety of welder's glass, shades 12 & 13. However, not all of it has arrived yet. Some were heat treated glass and the other was polycarbonate. I haven't received the polycarbonate yet. The heat treated glass was awful. Held up infront of my lens and the image was useless. Not even focusing manually did any good. It was like a double image. The poly won't be here in time for me, but I had already ordered some film, too, which I have setup on threaded & slide-in filters.


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TCampbell
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Aug 19, 2017 12:53 |  #9

bamatt wrote in post #18430912 (external link)
Can I use my variable ND filter at its darkest setting without jacking up my camera?

I have some solar film, but was just curious.

Thanks!

But if you have solar film... just make a filter. It's easy. Cut a piece of cardboard tube that can fit over the front of your lens... or cut a piece of cardboard in the shape of a verily large "X" and fold the tabs of the "X" back around your optical tube. Now cut a large diameter hole in the center and affix the solar film to it. Most people seem to use a few layers of cardboard to build a "sandwich" with cardboard-film-cardboard and glue it together.

The film need not be wrinkle free (most commercially made filters have wrinkles and it wont affect the image quality.)

The complexity of using anything else, such as an ND filter, depends on the physical aperture of the lens, the density of the film, and the focal length of the lens.

For example... I have a Herschel white-light solar wedge that I use with my telescope (I am not using this for the eclipse - I primarily use it for visual observing -- not imaging). Anyway, the concept of the device is that it goes at the back of the telescope, not the front. This means 100% of the Sun's energy travels through the scope and hits the solar wedge at the back. The wedge is basically a piece of glass that reflex some of the light out at a 90ยบ angle, but most energy goes straight through and hits a heat-sink to dissipate the Sun's energy.

So the reason I bring this up because the rules are that it can be used on telescopes up to about 4" of aperture... any more than that and it collects enough energy that it's probably over-heating the inside of the optical tube and may damage things... but at 4" or less, it's safe.

When you add an ND filter to the front, the filter is rejecting some of the Sun's energy. This could allow for larger physical aperture sizes.

But as you mentioned you already have the solar film... I'd just use the film and not worry about it.




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davesrose
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Post has been last edited 1 month ago by davesrose. 3 edits done in total.
Aug 20, 2017 23:33 as a reply to Celestron's post |  #10

If you're using a DSLR for taking photos of a solar eclipse, all camera manufacturers say you need a solar filter to prevent damage to the sensor. Apple is claiming you don't need to cover a smart phone camera because A: the sun doesn't take up much of the frame, and B: the sensors are much smaller

Nikon USA-How to photograph a solar eclipse (external link)


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markesc
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Aug 21, 2017 19:27 |  #11

Worked out just fine with a super dark ND "Marumi Dhg nd 100000"

First time eclipse shooter!

With filter

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No filter
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Celestron
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Aug 21, 2017 20:41 |  #12

Well with a different ND filter it looks good , The last image looks good but can tell you were maybe a second too early or too late for the DR . Spikes are dark reason why but overall for your effect looks good .




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markesc
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Aug 21, 2017 23:20 |  #13

Celestron wrote in post #18433712 (external link)
Well with a different ND filter it looks good , The last image looks good but can tell you were maybe a second too early or too late for the DR . Spikes are dark reason why but overall for your effect looks good .

Thanks! First time ever taking photos of the sun zoomed in like that! Had three cameras going at the same time and it was just crazy taking it all in, next one is in 2024 in the US apparently.. not sure if I can wait that long!




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ND instead of solar
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