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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Macro Talk
Thread started 25 May 2017 (Thursday) 20:57
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I'd like to copy 35mm negatives digitally in the easiest way possible

 
Left ­ Handed ­ Brisket
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Joined Jun 2011
The Uwharrie Mts, NC
Post has been edited 5 months ago by Left Handed Brisket.
May 28, 2017 19:10 |  #31

Seems like to convert color negs, I was setting highlight, mid tone and shadow "white balance" eyedroppers in the photoshop curves tool.

You can see that the shadows in the final image above has blue/cyan shadows even though the highlights are neutral or slightly yellow.


E-6 is your friend, better results, less work.


PSA: The above post may contain sarcasm, reply at your own risk | Formerly he's gone before apostrophe-gate | Not in gear database: Canon 70-210 3.5-4.5, Auto Sears 50mm 2.0 / 2x CL-360, Nikon SB-28, SunPak auto 322 D, Minolta 20

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jtmiv
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Joined Jan 2013
Harrisburg, PA
May 28, 2017 19:14 as a reply to post 18364932 |  #32

Dear Wilt,

Thank you for taking the time to further investigate the actual process. I think I can get by for my purposes with a macro lens and a slide copier. Nothing I will be doing will be mission critical. I'm only looking to save the pictures I want to save from each roll of film I send out to be processed, and a contact sheet will provide at least a decent guide for color correction.

I know I'll mess a lot of shots up, but you gotta learn somehow!

Regards,

Tim Murphy

Harrisburg, PA :-)


EOS Elan, EOS7NE, EOS 40D, EOS1DMK2, Canon 15-85 IS EF-S, Canon 28-80 USM, Canon 28-105f3.5/4.5 USM, Canon 70-210f3.5/4.5 USM, Canon 70-300f4.5/5.6 IS USM, Tamron 19-35f3.5/4.5, Tokina 80-400 ATX 11, Sigma 150-500 OS HSM, Promaster 7500DX, Benro A3580F

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Ramon-uk
Senior Member
Joined Mar 2006
Jun 29, 2017 13:23 |  #33

Copying colour negatives is easy, shoot in raw and include a part of the unexposed film base.
Click white balance on the film base, invert negative to positive, adjust brightness/contrast if necessary ... Done.




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MakisM1
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Joined Dec 2011
Houston
Sep 08, 2017 11:40 |  #34

I am a bit late in this conversation, but bear with me :lol:

I have used in the past slide duplicators (I still have them) and flatbed scanners. In a nutshell, you can make the copy, but the results are merely passable.

The trick is in the lighting.

The flatbed scanner might work (I've read) with a special film carrier that has special reflective backing. My experience without it was below mediocre.

I had above mediocre results scanning paper photos, especially if the colors remained stable and not migrated to magenta. I tried to batch the process, using the scanner feeder. After about 100 photos, the scanner head acquired a permanent (very hard to clean) paper ink(?) stain and all the scanned photos a line through them. I quit...

The film/slide duplicator tube, with the tube pointed at the sun, a white reflective surface (foamcore) etc. gave inconsistent, below mediocre results.

Back in 2012 I bought a Plustek OpticFilm 7400, on sale from B&H, a couple of hundred bucks. With hurricane Sandy and a move to Houston for professional reasons, the project was moved to the back burner (actually off the stove altogether). One of the reasons was that I run Linux and I knew it would take some effort to run (if at all) this kind of hardware.

Fast forward to Hurricane Harvey. We now live in Midtown, Houston. As part of the preparation, we moved all items from the ground floor to the first floor. In the process, I run into the filmscanner...

Helloooo!!...

Being locked up for 5 days while Harvey was raining on us (thankfully we stayed high and dry) I started trying to make the scanner talk to Linux. Fail... No driver even barely compatible.

All my PCs have dual boot capability, so I run the Windows 7 the PC came with (oh the shame)

Here is what a scanned negative from September 1983 looks like straight out of the scanner. No noise reduction or other post handling, medium resolution (450 DPI for a 4x6 print, or 2656x1798 pixels) for a 2 Mb JPEG.


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I think the results are superb. This photo will be rescanned shortly, for a full frame resolution TIFF which will be suitably post-processed to have a large print for the wall! :-D

The scanning process is manual (the film carriage does not autofeed) and slow, but the results are worth it.

I feel that for medium type resolutions (up to about 5200x3800 pixels) the resulting files are reasonable and the quality good enough to print 20x30 prints (which I seldom do). Nearly dSLR quality from my old Canon FTb!

I'll keep ypu posted.

Gerry
Canon 5D MkIII/Canon 60D/Canon EF-S 18-200/Canon EF 24-70L USM II/Canon EF 70-200L 2.8 USM II/Canon EF 50 f1.8 II/Σ 8-16/ 430 EXII
OS: Linux Ubuntu/PostProcessing: Darktable/Image Processing: GIMP

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Archibald
You must be quackers!
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Joined May 2008
Calgary
Sep 08, 2017 12:22 |  #35

MakisM1 wrote in post #18447343 (external link)
I am a bit late in this conversation, but bear with me :lol:

I have used in the past slide duplicators (I still have them) and flatbed scanners. In a nutshell, you can make the copy, but the results are merely passable.

The trick is in the lighting.

The flatbed scanner might work (I've read) with a special film carrier that has special reflective backing. My experience without it was below mediocre.

I had above mediocre results scanning paper photos, especially if the colors remained stable and not migrated to magenta. I tried to batch the process, using the scanner feeder. After about 100 photos, the scanner head acquired a permanent (very hard to clean) paper ink(?) stain and all the scanned photos a line through them. I quit...

The film/slide duplicator tube, with the tube pointed at the sun, a white reflective surface (foamcore) etc. gave inconsistent, below mediocre results.

Back in 2012 I bought a Plustek OpticFilm 7400, on sale from B&H, a couple of hundred bucks. With hurricane Sandy and a move to Houston for professional reasons, the project was moved to the back burner (actually off the stove altogether). One of the reasons was that I run Linux and I knew it would take some effort to run (if at all) this kind of hardware.

Fast forward to Hurricane Harvey. We now live in Midtown, Houston. As part of the preparation, we moved all items from the ground floor to the first floor. In the process, I run into the filmscanner...

Helloooo!!...

Being locked up for 5 days while Harvey was raining on us (thankfully we stayed high and dry) I started trying to make the scanner talk to Linux. Fail... No driver even barely compatible.

All my PCs have dual boot capability, so I run the Windows 7 the PC came with (oh the shame)

Here is what a scanned negative from September 1983 looks like straight out of the scanner. No noise reduction or other post handling, medium resolution (450 DPI for a 4x6 print, or 2656x1798 pixels) for a 2 Mb JPEG.


thumbnailHosted photo: posted by MakisM1 in
./showthread.php?p=184​47343&i=i34184412
forum: Macro Talk

I think the results are superb. This photo will be rescanned shortly, for a full frame resolution TIFF which will be suitably post-processed to have a large print for the wall! :-D

The scanning process is manual (the film carriage does not autofeed) and slow, but the results are worth it.

I feel that for medium type resolutions (up to about 5200x3800 pixels) the resulting files are reasonable and the quality good enough to print 20x30 prints (which I seldom do). Nearly dSLR quality from my old Canon FTb!

I'll keep ypu posted.

Well, that is quite a bit of information about where you lived and about your computer.

Now how about some info on the scanner and the scanning?

In my experience, scanning old 35mm negs at 2000 dpi already resolves the grain, so going higher would not improve the scan much.


Pentax Spotmatic F with 28/3.5, 50/1.4, 50/1.8, 135/3.5; Canon digital gear
C&C always welcome.
Picture editing OK

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MakisM1
Cream of the Crop
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Joined Dec 2011
Houston
Sep 08, 2017 12:31 as a reply to Archibald's post |  #36

As I mentioned before, the Film Scanner is:

Plustek Optic Film 7600 used with the bundled software (Silver Fast).

The negative is Kodak CP 100 5094 circa 1983.

You put the film in the film carriage provided and push manually until it clicks in the center of a frame. Once pre scanned, you have a one click option to optimize the exposure/contrast and you have an additional slider for saturation adjustment.

You can play with color adjustments (RGB/CMY) and it has an auto scratch remover (I can't attest that it does anything, has no controls).


Gerry
Canon 5D MkIII/Canon 60D/Canon EF-S 18-200/Canon EF 24-70L USM II/Canon EF 70-200L 2.8 USM II/Canon EF 50 f1.8 II/Σ 8-16/ 430 EXII
OS: Linux Ubuntu/PostProcessing: Darktable/Image Processing: GIMP

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Archibald
You must be quackers!
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Joined May 2008
Calgary
Sep 08, 2017 13:01 |  #37

MakisM1 wrote in post #18447405 (external link)
As I mentioned before, the Film Scanner is:

Plustek Optic Film 7600 used with the bundled software (Silver Fast).

The negative is Kodak CP 100 5094 circa 1983.

You put the film in the film carriage provided and push manually until it clicks in the center of a frame. Once pre scanned, you have a one click option to optimize the exposure/contrast and you have an additional slider for saturation adjustment.

You can play with color adjustments (RGB/CMY) and it has an auto scratch remover (I can't attest that it does anything, has no controls).

OK, very good. So the 7600 (or 7400?) is an actual scanner and not a photocopier? I suppose the scratch remover would be the IR type...

I used to adjust colors in the scanner software, but usually use Lightroom for that now.


Pentax Spotmatic F with 28/3.5, 50/1.4, 50/1.8, 135/3.5; Canon digital gear
C&C always welcome.
Picture editing OK

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MakisM1
Cream of the Crop
MakisM1's Avatar
Joined Dec 2011
Houston
Sep 08, 2017 13:44 as a reply to Archibald's post |  #38

Sorry, Plustek 7400.

I think that as in digital cameras, you need to optimize the scanning at the scanner. If one (for example) underexposes the scanned image by three stops, there is not much you can do in LR. There is a lot of post processing work to be done, especially trying to remove the noise, and sharpening, but I 'd prefer to get the scanning right in terms of exposure, contrast and saturation. Color balance, denoise, correction are better done in post.


Gerry
Canon 5D MkIII/Canon 60D/Canon EF-S 18-200/Canon EF 24-70L USM II/Canon EF 70-200L 2.8 USM II/Canon EF 50 f1.8 II/Σ 8-16/ 430 EXII
OS: Linux Ubuntu/PostProcessing: Darktable/Image Processing: GIMP

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Archibald
You must be quackers!
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Joined May 2008
Calgary
Sep 08, 2017 13:56 |  #39

Your scan looks real good.


Pentax Spotmatic F with 28/3.5, 50/1.4, 50/1.8, 135/3.5; Canon digital gear
C&C always welcome.
Picture editing OK

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MakisM1
Cream of the Crop
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Joined Dec 2011
Houston
Sep 08, 2017 17:05 |  #40

Thank you.

As I said, I was looking for a long time for a way to digitize my old film photos. I am tickled pink with the way they turned out using this inexpensive scanner.


Gerry
Canon 5D MkIII/Canon 60D/Canon EF-S 18-200/Canon EF 24-70L USM II/Canon EF 70-200L 2.8 USM II/Canon EF 50 f1.8 II/Σ 8-16/ 430 EXII
OS: Linux Ubuntu/PostProcessing: Darktable/Image Processing: GIMP

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I'd like to copy 35mm negatives digitally in the easiest way possible
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