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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Sports Talk 
Thread started 22 Sep 2017 (Friday) 06:09
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High Resolution for Dummies

 
redhorse
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Sep 22, 2017 06:09 |  #1

Hi All,

I am a beginner photographer and I shoot a lot of horse racing. I have a Canon 60 D and I have it in sports mode so I can shoot many frames sat a time. Reason is I like to get all 4 feet in the air when the are running or stretched out.

I contribute to a magazine regularly and he keeps asking me for high res images. I have read, and read about high resolution, and I just dont understand what setting to set my Canon on?

Can ANYONE please explain what setting, in very simple, basic terms so this dummy can understand it?


Many thanks!




  
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PhotosGuy
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Sep 22, 2017 08:22 |  #2

1. Are the images you're giving him large jpg?
2. Are you doing anything to them before you send them?
3. Have you asked him what type/resolution images he wants?
4. This thread belongs in "Talk", so I'm moving it. http://photography-on-the.net/forum/forumdis​play.php?f=117


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redhorse
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Post edited 8 months ago by redhorse.
     
Sep 23, 2017 08:45 as a reply to  @ PhotosGuy's post |  #3

Yes, the images are too large.

The only thing I do before I send them is set contrast if need be.

He always replies with I need high res..

Also, I cant shoot in manual because the horses are going about 30mph, and its not like shooting a car race, I need certain things like all 4 feet in the air, or stretched out, so I have to use sports mode for faster frames so I can choose which one I want to submit.




  
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MalVeauX
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Sep 23, 2017 09:05 |  #4

redhorse wrote in post #18458572 (external link)
Yes, the images are too large.

The only thing I do before I send them is set contrast if need be.

He always replies with I need high res..

Also, I cant shoot in manual because the horses are going about 30mph, and its not like shooting a car race, I need certain things like all 4 feet in the air, or stretched out, so I have to use sports mode for faster frames so I can choose which one I want to submit.

Sports mode is just a preset.

The only difference is the FPS is set to full or high speed burst. You can set that on manual, AV, TV, etc. Doesn't matter Available on all of them. Just look at your drive button and hit it a few times until you see "H" with a few frames stacked (3 I think?). You can then start controlling your camera for what you want, instead of letting it make all the decisions for you. Sports mode doesn't even exist other than a term on your camera, it's basically a preset, but you can set all those setting yourself in any basic manual or semi-auto mode so that you choose what it's doing.

You need to find out what your person is referring to when they say they need high resolution. 18MP is plenty of resolution to print a rather large poster. Let alone a little web image or magazine print size. Make sure you're actually sending the full resolution image and not a compressed version (some emails, social media, etc, compress things). Not sure how you're sharing your images. But start there. If they need more resolution at 18MP, and they're not compressed with resolution loss, then maybe it's because they're trying to crop down to a tiny portion and they're hitting the limits of what you're sending (ie, short focal length on a subject far away so occupies very few pixels). We need examples of what you're sending (uncropped) to know more; and what they're wanting out of the image specifically.

Very best,


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Pippan
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Sep 23, 2017 16:42 |  #5

redhorse wrote in post #18458572 (external link)
Yes, the images are too large.

The only thing I do before I send them is set contrast if need be.

He always replies with I need high res..

Also, I cant shoot in manual because the horses are going about 30mph, and its not like shooting a car race, I need certain things like all 4 feet in the air, or stretched out, so I have to use sports mode for faster frames so I can choose which one I want to submit.

Maybe he doesn't know what hi-res means. But if he does he probably wants your jpegs to have enough pixels in each direction (horizontally and vertically) to be able to print them at 300 dots per inch (with one dot equaling one pixel), i.e. if he wants to print them at 10" x 8", for example, he would want them to be 3000 pixels x 2400 pixels.


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Larry ­ Johnson
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Sep 24, 2017 15:41 |  #6

redhorse wrote in post #18457707 (external link)
Hi All,

I am a beginner photographer and I shoot a lot of horse racing. I have a Canon 60 D and I have it in sports mode so I can shoot many frames sat a time. Reason is I like to get all 4 feet in the air when the are running or stretched out.

I contribute to a magazine regularly and he keeps asking me for high res images. I have read, and read about high resolution, and I just dont understand what setting to set my Canon on?

Can ANYONE please explain what setting, in very simple, basic terms so this dummy can understand it?


Many thanks!

Start with a high quality SD card in your camera; a number 10.
From your camera menu, set image quality to the largest size possible. If you're only shooting JPEGs, select the L.
As far as I understand, resolution refers to the number of pixels wide an image is when it's displayed on a screen. However, when printed, resolution refers to the number of dots per inch of the print. As others mentioned above, ask your magazine contact to specify (in pixels or dots per inch) what resolution he needs.


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Hannya
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Post edited 8 months ago by Hannya.
     
Sep 25, 2017 15:53 |  #7

Resolution depends on output. 2000px x 3000px = 6mb. Same number of pixels will print quite easily. The bigger the print size, the lower the ppi can be, but typically for magazine = 300ppi. Use the largest file size your camera can shoot at. 18mb is more than enough. Don't reduce the file size to send them via email. Use dropbox and upload the edited but full size images.


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Craign
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Sep 25, 2017 22:26 |  #8

Get away from sports mode. Learn how to use M (manual.) Until you know how to use manual, use TV with shutter speed set at 1/1000 sec. or faster if possible. Higher shutter speeds yield sharper images. Any shutter speed much slower than 1/1000 sec. will have motion blur. Be sure continuous shooting speed is set for high speed. Capturing a horse with four-off-the-floor takes some degree of luck.

Shooting horse racing is fun. Enjoy!


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Chet
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Sep 25, 2017 22:35 |  #9

I've seen this before. Save file as .tif uncompressed. Some printers go by file size to mean resolution. They see 16bit tif to have all the data needed to make a high resolution print.


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Dan ­ Marchant
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Sep 28, 2017 02:45 |  #10

The final resolution of your images depends on several things.

1. You printer/publisher doesn't understand resolution.
If you right click on a JPG file and select Properties > Details it displays file info. Two of the pieces of info are Horizontal Resolution and Vertical Resolution which are expressed in DPI (dots per inch). Printers (as in the machine) used to use this setting to define the size of a printed image but they mostly ignore it now. Some cameras will add a placeholder entry in this field of 72dpi. Likewise some editing software will add a number to this field.

Some people (my editor included) look at a file and see 72dpi and complain that it is a low resolution file even if it is 5000x3000 pixels (which is certainly high enough for most printing needs). I shoot RAW and use Lightroom to export/create JPGs. I have LR configured to set the DPI to 300. It is meaningless but it keeps my editor happy.

2. Camera settings
The 60D allows you to shoot in RAW, MRAW & SRAW (medium RAW and small RAW). The latter two are, as the names suggest, smaller/lower pixel resolution than RAW. It can also shoot in JPEG with Large, Medium or Small JPEGS. It may be that sports mode defaults the camera to shooting in Medium or Small JPEG, thus producing smaller pixel resolution files. Another reason to get away from Sports mode and instead shoot in manual mode or Av/Tv mode.

3. Post processing software settings
If you use any post processing software to edit images they usually have export/save settings. This include the DPI setting mentioned above as well as the ability to resize the image in pixels - if you have it set to output your 5432 (H) x 3492 (V) pixels original files at 1200 x 768 pixels then the resulting image would be pretty low resolution.

4. Email software
A common problem is that when emailing images the email software resizes them down to makes them easier to send. So trying to email a full size 5432 (H) x 3492 (V) pixels image may result in it being resized to 1200 x 768.

5. Dropbox thumbnails
If you use dropbox to send images some clients will view the thumbnail of the image and then right click/download the thumnail, instead of using the proper Download button. The result is they end up with a lower resolution version of the file.


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High Resolution for Dummies
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