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Thread started 14 Nov 2017 (Tuesday) 13:45
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ND Filters Advice Please

 
tuttifrutti
Senior Member
Joined Aug 2008
Aldershot, Hampshire UK
Nov 14, 2017 13:45 |  #1

Hi folks,

I've been doing a little bit of reading up about taking shots of water/waterfalls/movin​g water, and it looks like, unless I am getting out and taking the shots as the light is fading, i'm going to need an ND filter.

I came across a web page recommending getting a 3 stop one and a 6 stop one, thoughts being that I have plenty of options covered using them singularly and also, then can stack them for brighter times etc

So, just after others thoughts on this and also recommendations for particular ones to look at?

I have a Canon 5D mkIII and a 24-70 f/2.8l mkII lens

Many thanks in advance


Hello...
My name's Ian and i'm a photography junkie :rolleyes:

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Nogo
I could have been worse....
Joined Dec 2013
All Along the Natchez Trace (Clinton, MS)
Post has been last edited 4 days ago by Nogo. 2 edits done in total.
Nov 14, 2017 14:33 |  #2

Are you only using it for stopping water movement? If so, you may also consider just using a polarizer instead of using a three stop. Most polarizer filters are around 2 or 3 stops and can be used for other things as well.

The 3 stop is good for portraits in brighter light but if you don't use it for that the polarizer will be of more use for landscape shooting.

Or get all three and stack them all for 11 or twelve stops.


Philip
Does the TF actually know about the soda cans and PVC pipe from 30 years ago?

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tuttifrutti
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
Joined Aug 2008
Aldershot, Hampshire UK
Nov 14, 2017 15:26 |  #3

Nogo wrote in post #18496401 (external link)
Are you only using it for stopping water movement? If so, you may also consider just using a polarizer instead of using a three stop. Most polarizer filters are around 2 or 3 stops and can be used for other things as well.

The 3 stop is good for portraits in brighter light but if you don't use it for that the polarizer will be of more use for landscape shooting.

Or get all three and stack them all for 11 or twelve stops.

Thanks for the reply Nogo

TBH i'm not sure what i'll use the ND filter for. I want to cover all eventualities.

The original reason for the thread was that I was trying to take a picture of a watermill on Sunday afternoon and all I got was a horrendous bleached image. After doing a bit more research into what I was doing wrong, it brought me onto ND filters.


Hello...
My name's Ian and i'm a photography junkie :rolleyes:

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saea501
... spilled over a little on the panties
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Post has been last edited 4 days ago by saea501. 2 edits done in total.
Nov 14, 2017 15:49 |  #4

Got three of them....ND 8, ND 64 and ND 100000 (just for direct sun shots}

Rarely use any of them. The waterfall thing, usually the ND 64 will get you where you need to be, 2-6 second exposure.

Plus, you don't use these to stop water movement as was mentioned above, they are used to allow longer shutter times so the water movement will be great enough to blur. I would also suggest that you avoid stacking filters. Every piece of glass in front of the lens can be degrading.


Remember what the DorMouse said.....feed your head.
Bob

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Wilt
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Post has been last edited 4 days ago by Wilt. 4 edits done in total.
Nov 14, 2017 16:45 |  #5

tuttifrutti wrote in post #18496370 (external link)
Hi folks,

I've been doing a little bit of reading up about taking shots of water/waterfalls/movin​g water, and it looks like, unless I am getting out and taking the shots as the light is fading, i'm going to need an ND filter.

I came across a web page recommending getting a 3 stop one and a 6 stop one, thoughts being that I have plenty of options covered using them singularly and also, then can stack them for brighter times etc

So, just after others thoughts on this and also recommendations for particular ones to look at?

I have a Canon 5D mkIII and a 24-70 f/2.8l mkII lens

Many thanks in advance

Think about this, and you can figure out what you might need...


  1. Using Sunny 16 rule, you know ISO 100 = 1/100 f/16 in bright sun
  2. If you assume you need to get the 'liquid blur' from water motion at 1/8 sec, that is about -4EV below Sunny 16 (1/100, 1/50, 1/25, 1/12, 1/6)


The big question is "What degree of blur do YOU think is 'enough blur' for water motion?"...and THAT depends upon falling water vs. flowing water vs. ocean water, and also how much blurring/smoothing you think suits the mood that you are trying to capture in the photo.

As for the suggestion about using a CPL in lieu of -3EV ND, THAT is misleading! While CPL might reduce POLARIZED light by -3EV, it affects an ordinary scene (light not polarized) by only about -1.5EV (this basic neutral density value depends upon the polarizing foil used in the filter...some lose more light or some lose less light)

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MalVeauX
"Looks rough and well used"
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Joined Feb 2013
Florida
Nov 14, 2017 16:55 |  #6

Heya,

I'd get a Haida PRO series, they're inexpensive, great quality, minimal color cast. Get a 10 stop. Get a 6 stop Get a 3 stop. And add a decent CPL, such as a Marumi Super DHG.

You'll be set for anything and everything.

I use a 10 stop and a 3 stop myself, and a CPL. Depends on the goal of blur you want. 10 is for maximum. 3 is if I just want to get a little blur, but keep some action (like waves).

Very best,


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ND Filters Advice Please
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