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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Astronomy & Celestial 
Thread started 23 Dec 2017 (Saturday) 04:59
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Moon shots - stacking only a few already detailed, low ISO images - Is it worth it?

 
MalVeauX
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Dec 25, 2017 22:07 |  #16

Tareq wrote in post #18526211 (external link)
Soon i will focus on the moon, once i get the scope as i said, i got the camera, new model, and Barlow maybe sooner or later too, then only left or missing is the scope, and i am having so so big discussions in many sites for which scope i should get, not for the moon, but the moon is an easy target anyway with any scope small or larger.

The moon may seem like an easy target at small scales. But at large scale, very high resolution, it's impossible to image without incredibly large apertures and exceptional seeing.

Very best,


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Tareq
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Dec 25, 2017 22:19 |  #17

MalVeauX wrote in post #18526220 (external link)
The moon may seem like an easy target at small scales. But at large scale, very high resolution, it's impossible to image without incredibly large apertures and exceptional seeing.

Very best,

large aperture will be done i hope, exceptional seeing, well, this is not in my hand, but from what i see around in the net, we have that exceptional seeing condition then, at least for the moon, but we have it for planets too.


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MalVeauX
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Dec 25, 2017 22:44 |  #18

Tareq wrote in post #18526229 (external link)
large aperture will be done i hope, exceptional seeing, well, this is not in my hand, but from what i see around in the net, we have that exceptional seeing condition then, at least for the moon, but we have it for planets too.

Depends on position in sky relative to horizon and whether or not you're using an atmospheric dispersion corrector (ADC).

It's really not that simple, or everyone would have top notch images of Jupiter's details.

Timing and seeing are a big part of it, which requires planning and lucky. After that, aperture. After that, equipment that supports it all.

Very best,


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Tareq
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Dec 25, 2017 23:14 |  #19

MalVeauX wrote in post #18526236 (external link)
Depends on position in sky relative to horizon and whether or not you're using an atmospheric dispersion corrector (ADC).

It's really not that simple, or everyone would have top notch images of Jupiter's details.

Timing and seeing are a big part of it, which requires planning and lucky. After that, aperture. After that, equipment that supports it all.

Very best,

Don't worry, i am sure no doubt the seeing condition or turbulence is nice, so this is PASS, now it is equipment and aperture as you said.

What is ADC doing in this situation? is it necessary? i bought one without knowing if it is useful or not, just in case.

I started a thread in an astro forum site asking about a telescope i would like to use for planetary, i don't want to start here because it is few or less members into astro than there, the camera and Barlow are done, software for capturing is also done, i read about it all, so i am waiting answers there, and also waiting the planets showing up in our sky later next year, so hope the scope is ready before that or just pass it for next year and do it in 2019.


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Dec 26, 2017 08:38 |  #20

Tareq wrote in post #18526252 (external link)
Don't worry, i am sure no doubt the seeing condition or turbulence is nice, so this is PASS, now it is equipment and aperture as you said.

What is ADC doing in this situation? is it necessary? i bought one without knowing if it is useful or not, just in case.

I started a thread in an astro forum site asking about a telescope i would like to use for planetary, i don't want to start here because it is few or less members into astro than there, the camera and Barlow are done, software for capturing is also done, i read about it all, so i am waiting answers there, and also waiting the planets showing up in our sky later next year, so hope the scope is ready before that or just pass it for next year and do it in 2019.

The ADC is important for planetary imaging becuase you rarely will ever have a planet near Zenith and often times not in ideal locations relative to your horizon so it helps adjust for atmospheric conditions which greatly effect seeing. It's one of those must-haves for a lot of planetary imaging sessions.

Planetary imaging is about having as big of an aperture as you can manage to get, with a focal ratio that matches up with your pixel size for ideal critical sampling and then it's all about seeing conditions. It's very important to get ideal sampling if you want to get the most detail at the scale you're imaging at. A C11 would be my starting suggestion, assuming your mount can take it.

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Dec 26, 2017 10:52 |  #21

MalVeauX wrote in post #18526393 (external link)
The ADC is important for planetary imaging becuase you rarely will ever have a planet near Zenith and often times not in ideal locations relative to your horizon so it helps adjust for atmospheric conditions which greatly effect seeing. It's one of those must-haves for a lot of planetary imaging sessions.

Planetary imaging is about having as big of an aperture as you can manage to get, with a focal ratio that matches up with your pixel size for ideal critical sampling and then it's all about seeing conditions. It's very important to get ideal sampling if you want to get the most detail at the scale you're imaging at. A C11 would be my starting suggestion, assuming your mount can take it.

Very best,

That is why i bought this ADC even i wasn't sure how to use it, just i did read it will do something for planetary and lunar imaging, so i bought it, wasn't that expensive anyway.

I started a thread somewhere else asking about a mount that can handle C14, i was planning to go with C11 or even Meade 12", but i know that 11" or 12" are nice but 14" and 16" are real planets killers and mind blowing, so i wanted to jump very high, and the discussions are still going on, but i may not get that C14 or any 14" SCT soon as long the mount is the main problem, i may delay it and just go with refractos and Newt first for DSO only then later i can start to save for 14"SCT with suitable mount.


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Dec 27, 2017 08:00 |  #22

Tareq wrote in post #18526468 (external link)
That is why i bought this ADC even i wasn't sure how to use it, just i did read it will do something for planetary and lunar imaging, so i bought it, wasn't that expensive anyway.

I started a thread somewhere else asking about a mount that can handle C14, i was planning to go with C11 or even Meade 12", but i know that 11" or 12" are nice but 14" and 16" are real planets killers and mind blowing, so i wanted to jump very high, and the discussions are still going on, but i may not get that C14 or any 14" SCT soon as long the mount is the main problem, i may delay it and just go with refractos and Newt first for DSO only then later i can start to save for 14"SCT with suitable mount.

You're on an EQ6 if I recall. A C11 is manageable on that. For the cost, it's very good. Pushing into a mount for a C16 is very expensive and extremely limited to basically one thing. I'd just get a C11 and practice and learn with it on the EQ6 you have, see if planetary is even something you want to be dedicated to.

I'd stick to whatever refractor you have and a C11. No real reason to add a reflector for imaging in my opinion unless you need it for aperture purposes for the tiniest of DSO targets. But really, practice with your refractor and get good at it on the big bright targets. Then worry about the hard stuff later.

Very best,


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Dec 27, 2017 14:26 |  #23

MalVeauX wrote in post #18527091 (external link)
You're on an EQ6 if I recall. A C11 is manageable on that. For the cost, it's very good. Pushing into a mount for a C16 is very expensive and extremely limited to basically one thing. I'd just get a C11 and practice and learn with it on the EQ6 you have, see if planetary is even something you want to be dedicated to.

I'd stick to whatever refractor you have and a C11. No real reason to add a reflector for imaging in my opinion unless you need it for aperture purposes for the tiniest of DSO targets. But really, practice with your refractor and get good at it on the big bright targets. Then worry about the hard stuff later.

Very best,

I really don't have that "later" matter in my life from what i faced, so i will always hit it or pull the trigger while i have the opportunity.

I talked there and they told me all what i need, they all also don't go for large and whatever, talked about seeing condition, talked about weight and mount load capacity, talked about pricing, we discussed all, but i am still want to have large scope no matter what.

My plan is:
1. Buy an APO refractor now or very soon, for DSO
2. Buy a Newt too, F4 version i hope, for DSO too and planetary sometimes, i have a reason why i go with this.
3. Saving and keep saving next year so i can afford a stiff capable mount.
4. in 2019 maybe 2020 i buy whatever large scope, be it 14" or 16"

With all above i will just ignore about 11" completely, unless i become really lucky and get an unexpected budget somewhere so i can buy that 11" without changing my above plan, but i really don't want to go with the rule of "Buy this now, learn it, then buy something later", this is not what i do, even if i do i may do to some stuff but not all or everything, and even some didn't like this idea but they respected after all.

Also, they told me how great are those 8" and 9.25" and 11", i know, i saw results from known globally astrophotographers, but i still love their 14" images, and i don't care how many years they spent to reach that level, well, i will spend and waste years on larger rather than small and then again large, and my budget i really don't want to waste it in "Twice purchase" even if it is the better way of learning, i accept the challenges.


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Moon shots - stacking only a few already detailed, low ISO images - Is it worth it?
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