Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Read More.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Nature & Landscapes Talk
Thread started 23 Jan 2018 (Tuesday) 13:57
Prev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as registered member)

I wrote a Seascape Photography Guide. Please check it out!

 
Cham_001
Senior Member
Cham_001's Avatar
863 posts
Joined Feb 2009
based between Ruse, Bulgaria & Recife-Brazil
Feb 05, 2018 09:06 |  #16

bw!

Thank you for creating the Guide. Totally insightful!


"... with a clear perspective - the confusion is clearer ..."
Body: Canon 5D-IV
Lenses: 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM, 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM
Flashguns: 580ex II x 4, MT24 macro flash
Accessories: Pkt Wiz TT5 x 4, AC3, MiniTT1, Sekonic L-758DR
Studio Lights: <... pending ...>

LOG IN TO REPLY
antongorlin
THREAD ­ STARTER
Hatchling
7 posts
Joined Oct 2017
Sydney
Feb 19, 2018 20:15 |  #17

ejenner wrote in post #18556553 (external link)
I only flicked through, but in the 'bracketing issues' I would think a big one would be movement, especially for seascapes. I rarely use filters and almost always bracket and can get away with it even for moving trees and the like, with modern software. HOWEVER, I don't shoot many seascapes, but when I do (or have done) I usually will use a filter if possible. Moving waves and a generally flat horizon (even if the wave crests are above the horizon) usually make it a better option, or at the very least one worth considering even for die-hard brackers like myself.

OTOH I guess from your comments you bracket more than use filters. So is there a particular technique for bracketing seascapes? Might be worth mentioning how you cope with movement.

I understand the issue. Typically, water is not overexposed. It's just the sky. So I take the water and the waves from a single shot, then the sky from another one. More often than not, the rocks (or whatever else I have there) have no details lost in shadows, so I'd just brighten them a bit. However, sometimes I need a third brighter exposure for the rocks.




LOG IN TO REPLY

488 views & 4 likes for this thread
I wrote a Seascape Photography Guide. Please check it out!
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Nature & Landscapes Talk


Not a member yet? Click here to register to the forums.
Registered members get all the features: search, following threads, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, settings, view hosted photos, own reviews and more...


AAA

Send feedback to staff    •   Jump to forum...    •   Rules    •   Index    •   New posts    •   RTAT    •   'Best of'    •   Gallery    •   Gear    •   Reviews    •   Polls

COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Privacy policy and cookie usage info.

POWERED BY AMASS 1.4version 1.4
made in Finland
by Pekka Saarinen
for photography-on-the.net
Spent 0.00108 for 6 database queries.
PAGE COMPLETED IN 0.01s
Latest registered member is ddelaneyrose
869 guests, 373 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 6430, that happened on Dec 03, 2017