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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Nature & Landscapes Talk
Thread started 06 Feb 2018 (Tuesday) 11:15
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Filter flare

 
chrismid259
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Feb 06, 2018 11:15 |  #1

Hello,

I couldn't see a more specific board for this question, so I'm posting this here.

Recently, I was taking some images of a sunset. I was using a Fuji XT1 with Lee 0.9 hard ND grad to begin with, then added a Hi-Tech 0.9 ND full grad which I placed into slot 2. The moment I put the full ND grad into the filter holder a flare appeared. When I took the filter out again, the flare didn't appear. When I took the filter holder off completely, there was no flare visible. This leads me to think that the flare has something to do with the full ND grad.

I've uploaded the photo which is unedited. I didn't really get the time to mess about and take comparison images with and without the filter, but the image I've attached is with both filters. You can see the lens flare just under the lighthouse.

Settings: 10-24 at 16mm, ISO 100, f16, 1.9 seconds.

I'm wondering if certain combinations of filters increase the likelihood of a flare, especially with sunsets. Of course, I'll have to try this out again at some point, but I've never come across this before.

I'm interested to read thoughts on this.

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MalVeauX
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Feb 06, 2018 11:18 |  #2

Coatings matter on filters. Some are better than others at flare control. You might want to simply replace that filter that you're having issues with flaring.

Did you test it with the filter alone with flaring?

Very best,


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Wilt
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Post has been edited 16 days ago by Wilt.
Feb 06, 2018 11:35 |  #3

Flare happens when light is reflected off one surface and bounces back from another surface -- between two filters is an example of when this happens. Quality coatings improve the light transmission, and reduce the amount of light which bounces off the air-glass interface. Between two planar surfaces (your drop in filters) flare is worse than between one planar surface and the curved surface of the front of your lens. Drop in filter systems generally don't have the best quality coatings.


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ejenner
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Feb 17, 2018 21:49 |  #4

IME this happens more with drop-in filters than high-quality screw-in, but can (and does) certainly happen with any filter. On a seashore where you might want to use a protective filter, for instance, do you take if off or leave it in (assuming you are not using other filters)?

I've had this happen a lot, so I think you have either been lucky in the past or you don't usually shoot with quite this particular setup and/or sun in that position (perhaps relative to were the filter edge is?).

Bottom line: nothing unusual IMO.


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John ­ from ­ PA
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Feb 18, 2018 09:42 |  #5

chrismid259 wrote in post #18557693 (external link)
I was using a Fuji XT1 with Lee 0.9 hard ND grad to begin with, then added a Hi-Tech 0.9 ND full grad which I placed into slot 2.

As others have pointed out, it is likely the light bouncing around with the four additional glass surfaces that you've added. You can't retake your sample image of course but next time you try something similar try reversing the filters, i. e., put the Hi-Tech 0.9 ND in slot 1, and see what happens.




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Archibald
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Calgary
Feb 18, 2018 09:55 |  #6

It's called ghosting. A hot spot in the image shows up as a ghost on the opposite side of the photo. The phenomenon has been known for ages. The flat surface of the filter reflects the hot spot off the sensor. Decades ago Pentax (maybe others too) made curved filters to prevent ghosting. The best remedy if you must use a filter is to use quality coated ones.

https://physics.stacke​xchange.com ...images-centrally-inverted (external link)


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John ­ from ­ PA
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Feb 18, 2018 10:30 |  #7

Archibald wrote in post #18566675 (external link)
It's called ghosting.

See https://photographylif​e.com/what-is-ghosting-and-flare (external link)




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antongorlin
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Sydney
Feb 19, 2018 20:18 |  #8

Even the best lenses with no filters could get these. It could also be the certain angle or a greasy filter. There is an easy fix. You make 1 shot just like you did and then create another one with the sun covered by your finger. Then there are no flares or low contrast or other artifacts and then you just combine in photoshop. This is a good thing to do even when there are no flares - to keep the good contrast.




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Bcaps
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Post has been edited 1 day ago by Bcaps.
Feb 20, 2018 20:30 |  #9

When you are on a tripod you can take another photo with the sun blocked out by your hand/finger to remove the flaring and then blend the two images in post.


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