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Canon EOS Rebel K2

FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk
Thread started 27 Jun 2011 (Monday) 20:09   
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jdave420
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Hey guys I'm new here and just had a couple questions about my camera. My mother in law gave it to us about a year or so ago and I know nothing about photography. Is it still a decent camera? Is it worth anything to anybody if I wanted to sell it? Would it be worth keeping? Is there anyway I can take the film into like a walmart and just get it put on cd instead of getting copies of the pics??? Just a few noob questions. Thanks

Post #1, Jun 27, 2011 20:09:55




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tonylong
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I know nothing about the camera and haven't shot film in years, but if my memory serves me well you should be able to have a shop burn a CD -- I don't know about Walmart specifically -- you'll have to call around and find out who has that service for film.

As to whether the camera is "worth keeping", well sure but whether it will just waste space is up to you and your motivation to get out and take pictures and to learn how an SLR camera works. By "SLR" (which stands for "Single Lens Reflex") I mean a camera which uses removable/exchangable lenses, although the SLR term refers to the fact that the view you see in the viewfinder comes to you directly through the lens and a setup of optical devices that pass the image on to your viewfinder.

But, there is more to an SLR than just that. SLRs (and the digital "equivalents") are known for having an array of controls that can seem to be overwhelming until you wade into learning (starting with the Owners Manual) and practicing.

But, from what I gather from a quick Google search, the K2 does feature some "automation", meaning you can quickly start taking pictures without having to first learn how to manually manipulate things. Assuming your camera came with a Canon EF lens you will have Auto Focus, and, if you do a quick first read through the Manual it should tell you at the beginning how to quickly get started.

You say you "know nothing" about photography -- does this mean you have never handled a "snapshot" camera? Or just that you know nothing about using an SLR-type of camera?

Post #2, Jun 27, 2011 20:57:56


Tony
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Wildlife project pics hereexternal link, Biking Photog shoots hereexternal link, "Suburbia" project hereexternal link! Mount St. Helens, Mount Hood pics hereexternal link

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jdave420
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a little of both for the "know nothing" I have never used a camera for a "hobby" you could say. I have taken lots of pics of my kids and stuff but I also know nothing about the SLR-type of camera either.

Post #3, Jun 27, 2011 21:16:35




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tonylong
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Well, it will be a learning curve to understand all the camera can do. And, if you've ever used something like a compact digicam with a nice zoom, you may be surprised at the limitations if you have only one lens that goes with the camera.

But, like I said, the camera Maunal should have some easy-to-follow instructions on how to get started quickly -- pretty much you should be able to get started taking "snapshots" and then it's up to you if you get more "serious" about your photography or not!

And, by the way, this is a great place to spend time even though you are using a film camera and most of us here are using digital! There are actually a good number of people here who are shooting film, but even more importantly is the fact that fundamental photography is quite consistent between both types of camera. Yes, there are some differences and that should be borne in mind, but so much is the same!

By the way, an excellent book for someone just getting started with "serious" photography is Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson (widely available through many major book ooutlets, Amazon, etc.). Along with studying your camera manual, that would be an excellent "primer" in learning what your camera is capable of.

Post #4, Jun 27, 2011 22:03:02


Tony
Two Canon cameras (5DC, 30D), three Canon lenses (24-105, 100-400, 100mm macro)
Tony Long Photos on PBaseexternal link
Wildlife project pics hereexternal link, Biking Photog shoots hereexternal link, "Suburbia" project hereexternal link! Mount St. Helens, Mount Hood pics hereexternal link

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j-dogg
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That little Rebel K2 will blow every camera Walmart sells right into the Cretaceous Period.

Keep it, get a couple of rolls of film, learn how to use it, and go take some nice photographs of your kids instead of cute snapshots. Coming from someone who has thousands of dollars invested into a high-end digital SLR and professional-grade lenses that cost more than my car, I still keep a Canon Elan 7e 35mm in my bag for when I want to use a real camera. It's not all that different from your K2.

I also have a Nikon SLR film system that dates back to the early 60's that I shoot on a regular basis. Film isn't dead it's actually gaining some resurgence, kind of like how audiophiles prefer vinyl over CD's and mp3's.

You can not only find film readily available at almost any store, but you can get it scanned in as well to CD, and pretty cheaply too. My last roll was about 5 bucks at Walgreens.

You don't even need to spend all that crazy money on good lenses for that camera. there are lots of Canon lenses that will work on it that yield great image quality and don't cost as much as a mortgage payment. EF 28-105 f3.5-4.5 USM Macro, 50mm f1.8 II, 70-210 f4, the list is long but distinguished.

You've come to the right place with it.

Post #5, Jun 28, 2011 04:03:51 as a reply to tonylong's post 6 hours earlier.


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jdave420
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Hey guys I have a little update here. I just tried using the camera for the first time and every time after I take a picture the battery indicator blinks. Also the flash doesn't seem to work. It will flash a few times before I take a pic but won't flash when I actually take the pic. Just wondering if you guys could give me some insight into this. I have been mulling this over and I really wanted to get into photography a little but I don't really have the funds to get a nice camera so this is all I have. Thanks

Post #6, Jul 21, 2011 17:10:58




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tonylong
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jdave420 wrote in post #12800753external link
Hey guys I have a little update here. I just tried using the camera for the first time and every time after I take a picture the battery indicator blinks. Also the flash doesn't seem to work. It will flash a few times before I take a pic but won't flash when I actually take the pic. Just wondering if you guys could give me some insight into this. I have been mulling this over and I really wanted to get into photography a little but I don't really have the funds to get a nice camera so this is all I have. Thanks

Hey, it took me 6 days to see this, sorry!

What kind of battery does the camera use?

Is the battery you have new? Or is it the original battery that you have charged? If it's an old rechargable battery then it has likely neared the end of its life cycle. I'd find a new battery (if you can, get a newer-model rechargable one -- of course, you'll typically have to charge it before use).

Post #7, Jul 27, 2011 17:21:24


Tony
Two Canon cameras (5DC, 30D), three Canon lenses (24-105, 100-400, 100mm macro)
Tony Long Photos on PBaseexternal link
Wildlife project pics hereexternal link, Biking Photog shoots hereexternal link, "Suburbia" project hereexternal link! Mount St. Helens, Mount Hood pics hereexternal link

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jdave420
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tonylong wrote in post #12833636external link
Hey, it took me 6 days to see this, sorry!

What kind of battery does the camera use?

Is the battery you have new? Or is it the original battery that you have charged? If it's an old rechargable battery then it has likely neared the end of its life cycle. I'd find a new battery (if you can, get a newer-model rechargable one -- of course, you'll typically have to charge it before use).

Thanks for the reply. The camera uses two CR-2 lithium batteries and they are brand new.

Post #8, Jul 27, 2011 17:49:17




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j-dogg
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If it's really cold outside they tend to not function properly.

I recently acquired a Rebel Ti, which is the same camera but with a metal lens mount and it has an illuminated rear LCD display.

Check the battery contacts, did you just purchase the batteries or are they the ones the camera came with?

Put up a picture of the rear LCD and let me have a look at it.

Post #9, Jul 28, 2011 03:19:48 as a reply to jdave420's post 9 hours earlier.


5D / 400d / 70-200-4LIS / 50 Mk.I / 28-70
RB67 Pro-S / 50-90-180 Holy Trinity, 120/polaroid back
Graphic View I 4x5 / Schneider 180 / Meyer 135 / Ektar 127

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tonylong
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jdave420 wrote in post #12833788external link
Thanks for the reply. The camera uses two CR-2 lithium batteries and they are brand new.

Well then, it's hard to say what the problem might be. It's probably normal for the battery indicator to flash a bit after taking one or more shots, but from what you describe, especially the flash not working, it sounds like the camera has a problem.

If you can get good shots in good light, then at least you have something to work with and get a feel of capturing images!

Post #10, Jul 29, 2011 14:31:28


Tony
Two Canon cameras (5DC, 30D), three Canon lenses (24-105, 100-400, 100mm macro)
Tony Long Photos on PBaseexternal link
Wildlife project pics hereexternal link, Biking Photog shoots hereexternal link, "Suburbia" project hereexternal link! Mount St. Helens, Mount Hood pics hereexternal link

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