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FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos The Business of Photography
Thread started 17 Feb 2012 (Friday) 14:28
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which photos for the client?

 
ernestoqr
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Feb 17, 2012 14:28 |  #1

I have read in this forum a lot of good advise regarding which photos a photographer presents to the client once he ( the photographer) chose the good ones.
But it has happened to me that there are some photos that I dont like or even that are technically wrong ( blurred, noise, overexposed, wrong pose) and this pics is what the client wants, in one case a picture that I didnt like it and by mistake it was with the proof that I gave to the clients It was chosen by them to make a big print. Here is my Q?
Do you always decide what picture the client sees? Or do you give them all the pictures saying that good and bads are all included and they decide which one to print?




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joedlh
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Feb 17, 2012 14:43 |  #2

I never show clients or anybody else a picture that is technically flawed or of poor composition. Once I've weeded those out, I remove redundant images. I might not like some of those that are left, but that is more in the area of personal taste. So they stay in.


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RDKirk
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Feb 17, 2012 16:01 |  #3

I always decide what my client sees. I will show those that meet my technical and artistic standards--which would be more than I'd select for my own portfolio--but all the client sees will be up to my technical and artistic standards.

An exception would be if, for instance, some were unique in subject. For instance, if somehow I don't manage to get a pleasant image of a member in a family portrait, I'll still go with what I've got. But if I have a choice of a pleasant image and an unpleasant image, I'll cull the unpleasant image.

My goal at the sales preview is to have only "Wow" moments, no "Aw, shucks" moments. The ability to know what is good is one of the primary reasons to hire a professional. Otherwise--because modern cameras are quite capable of taking technically acceptable photographs in nearly anyone's hands--we're just meat-based remote shutter releases if we can't make artistic judgments.




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head2heel
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Feb 17, 2012 16:46 |  #4

RDKirk wrote in post #13916338external link
I always decide what my client sees. I will show those that meet my technical and artistic standards--which would be more than I'd select for my own portfolio--but all the client sees will be up to my technical and artistic standards.

2nd.




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JacobPhoto
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Feb 17, 2012 17:30 |  #5

Yup.

Nobody showcases the 'prototype' product or the product that failed QA... only the product that is worthy of final production.


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Mark1
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Feb 17, 2012 18:10 |  #6

I will pull obvoiusly bad ones. But I will leave in some questionable ones if it is a laugh, funny face etc...etc... While they may suck from a technical point of view, Or from one that has no emotional connection to the subject.... BUT... You never know what will pull on the heart strings of the client. A smirk that ruins the shot for you... May be the one little thing that perfectly captures the subjects personality. And every other photographer just waits for the "cheese face". All of a sudden you are a hero. You can take your best guess, but you never know when you are throwing out pure gold.


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jra
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Feb 18, 2012 15:14 |  #7

I'll remove any that are technically incorrect (such as missed focus, closed eyes, etc.) From there, I'll go through and pick the ones that I feel are "worthy". I will be somewhat lenient on my choices because I've found that sometimes a customer will absolutely love a photo that I was on the verge of deleting. I never leave in photos that I consider "bad".


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shiftonephoto
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Feb 19, 2012 03:01 |  #8

I think its best to grab a good selection for them to pick from because likes it been stated their favorite photos might be the ones you really didnt like that much, I see it happen when I check gallery views from shoots all the time. The ones I was meh about sometimes have the most views from the client.

Just obviously dont even show them oof, or bad shots and you should be fine.


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BreitlingFan
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Feb 19, 2012 10:24 |  #9
banned

I always tell me clients that they don't get to see the bad ones...


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RDKirk
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Feb 19, 2012 11:49 |  #10

shiftonephoto wrote in post #13923199external link
I think its best to grab a good selection for them to pick from because likes it been stated their favorite photos might be the ones you really didnt like that much, I see it happen when I check gallery views from shoots all the time. The ones I was meh about sometimes have the most views from the client.

Just obviously dont even show them oof, or bad shots and you should be fine.

This is where there needs to be enough conversation before the session about the client's vision and the photographer's vision. What is that client specifically expecting from that photographer? I don't just take pictures, I make portraits through a specific vision that is my own, and people come to me who are attracted to my particular way of seeing my clients.

If I were taking headshots for Tyra Banks and happened to get a shot of her with her finger up her nose, I would not show it. If I were taking headshots for Whoopi Goldberg...I probably would.




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shiftonephoto
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Feb 19, 2012 13:50 |  #11

RDKirk wrote in post #13924494external link
This is where there needs to be enough conversation before the session about the client's vision and the photographer's vision. What is that client specifically expecting from that photographer? I don't just take pictures, I make portraits through a specific vision that is my own, and people come to me who are attracted to my particular way of seeing my clients.

If I were taking headshots for Tyra Banks and happened to get a shot of her with her finger up her nose, I would not show it. If I were taking headshots for Whoopi Goldberg...I probably would.

I was speaking about family photos, like its been stated there are times someone is making a face your not totally sold on, but it might be moms favorite face they make. You certainly get a feel for a family in consultations, but little nuance's like that you might not know about.


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RDKirk
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Feb 19, 2012 16:38 |  #12

shiftonephoto wrote in post #13924947external link
I was speaking about family photos, like its been stated there are times someone is making a face your not totally sold on, but it might be moms favorite face they make. You certainly get a feel for a family in consultations, but little nuance's like that you might not know about.

I had said, "This is where there needs to be enough conversation before the session about the client's vision and the photographer's vision. What is that client specifically expecting from that photographer? I don't just take pictures, I make portraits through a specific vision that is my own, and people come to me who are attracted to my particular way of seeing my clients."

This still applies to "family photos." I apply my particular style and vision to portraits of families just as I do to everything else. If I photograph a pet, that portrait will be with that same style and vision. I will still engage the client in a conversation about what she wants in and out of the portrait. I will design the portrait, photograph it, and make the image choices based on that conversation, seen through the lens of my style and vision.




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shiftonephoto
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Feb 19, 2012 17:07 |  #13

RDKirk wrote in post #13925734external link
I had said, "This is where there needs to be enough conversation before the session about the client's vision and the photographer's vision. What is that client specifically expecting from that photographer? I don't just take pictures, I make portraits through a specific vision that is my own, and people come to me who are attracted to my particular way of seeing my clients."

This still applies to "family photos." I apply my particular style and vision to portraits of families just as I do to everything else. If I photograph a pet, that portrait will be with that same style and vision. I will still engage the client in a conversation about what she wants in and out of the portrait. I will design the portrait, photograph it, and make the image choices based on that conversation, seen through the lens of my style and vision.

I can certainly appreciate that, I personally have plenty of ideas in mind and apply my style, and speak with clients to understand what they are looking for. I was simply giving the OP advice on way to present their photos to clients.


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ernestoqr
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Feb 20, 2012 10:13 as a reply to shiftonephoto's post |  #14

Mark1 wrote in post #13916931external link
I will pull obvoiusly bad ones. But I will leave in some questionable ones if it is a laugh, funny face etc...etc... While they may suck from a technical point of view, Or from one that has no emotional connection to the subject.... BUT... You never know what will pull on the heart strings of the client. A smirk that ruins the shot for you... May be the one little thing that perfectly captures the subjects personality. And every other photographer just waits for the "cheese face". All of a sudden you are a hero. You can take your best guess, but you never know when you are throwing out pure gold.

shiftonephoto wrote in post #13923199external link
I think its best to grab a good selection for them to pick from because likes it been stated their favorite photos might be the ones you really didnt like that much, I see it happen when I check gallery views from shoots all the time. The ones I was meh about sometimes have the most views from the client.

Just obviously dont even show them oof, or bad shots and you should be fine.

This is what I talking about... of course closed eyes or OOF for no reason is not an option to show but sometimes a gesture that we dont know is very particular to a couple or family member is the best picture for them and we dont see that...Thanks all for the reply




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which photos for the client?
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