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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk
Thread started 03 Jan 2015 (Saturday) 20:12
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masters degree in photography

 
kenwood33
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Jan 03, 2015 20:12 |  #1

Recently ran across this 'job' posting..

....Having a Master's (or higher) degree in Photography is a must since this is a very highly technical requirement. Please do not apply unless you have at least a Master's degree in Photography. ....

I did a quick google search and did not find any universities in the US that offer a master's degree in photography. Perhaps it is something new that I am too old for?


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AlFooteIII
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Jan 03, 2015 20:26 |  #2

http://mfaphoto.school​ofvisualarts.edu/external link For instance


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nqjudo
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Jan 03, 2015 20:28 |  #3

I know a couple of people who have degrees in film, video and photography from the Polytechnic of Central London but unfortunately I believe the school no longer exists.


No photographer is as good as the simplest camera. - Edward Steichen.

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Wilt
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Jan 04, 2015 01:11 |  #4

Google 'Masters Photography' and you will find a number of places that offer that degree, including the reknown Brooks Institute and Rochester Institute of Technology


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airfrogusmc
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Post has been edited over 2 years ago by airfrogusmc.
Jan 04, 2015 10:08 |  #5

RISD
Art Institute of Chicago
Columbia College Chicago

These are just 3 of hundreds. If you want to teach photography at a college or university full time you will need an MFA which is more than a Masters.




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watt100
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Jan 04, 2015 14:52 |  #6

kenwood33 wrote in post #17364647external link
Recently ran across this 'job' posting..

....Having a Master's (or higher) degree in Photography is a must since this is a very highly technical requirement. Please do not apply unless you have at least a Master's degree in Photography. ....

I did a quick google search and did not find any universities in the US that offer a master's degree in photography. Perhaps it is something new that I am too old for?


graduate degrees in photography? kinda like getting a PhD in plumbing




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number ­ six
"After 40 years still not housebroken, I still piddle on the carpet"
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Jan 04, 2015 15:01 |  #7

watt100 wrote in post #17365929external link
graduate degrees in photography? kinda like getting a PhD in plumbing

Uh, oh! You're sure gonna step on somebody's tail with that remark!  :p


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Luxx
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Jan 04, 2015 15:10 |  #8

[ducks and waits]




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Snafoo
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Post has been last edited over 2 years ago by Snafoo. 2 edits done in total.
Jan 04, 2015 16:02 |  #9

number six wrote in post #17365948external link
Uh, oh! You're sure gonna step on somebody's tail with that remark!  :p

I think he succeeded in simultaneously insulting photographers AND plumbers. ;-)a

FWIW, I could see a museum curator of photography requiring a Ph.D., or a Masters at minimum.


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airfrogusmc
I'm a chimper. There I said it...
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Jan 04, 2015 16:26 |  #10

watt100 wrote in post #17365929external link
graduate degrees in photography? kinda like getting a PhD in plumbing

No big surprise. To many today in the west argue for ignorance. No wonder we keep falling farther and farther behind others that put a real value on knowledge.




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advaitin
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Jan 04, 2015 17:10 |  #11

As a student, but a very experienced student because I had been shooting quite a while and working for newspapers as a photographer, with one year at the the technical school photography program in Daytona Beach, I had an employer who had recently finished his masters at Rochester. This fellow could probably make developer out of a can of coke and refined dirt, I mean he had learned all the formulas and many ingredients. He had studied color--had a complete understanding of the color wheel. Definitely more knowledgeable about light than Ansel Adams (because he said so). He hired me to do the general shooting for instructional slides and the scut-work printing in the darkroom, plus keeping all the chemicals fresh.
The guy only came into the darkroom for a couple of projects, say a portrait of the dean of the nursing school, who was his boss. And he was meticulous. He must have done 20 test strips to get the exact shade of gray or black before he began to print seriously.
When left to myself to print, I used a light meter with a density head, my own property, made an 8x10 or 5x7 basic flimsy print, studied it for a minute, then printed the full-size print, burning or dodging as my eye suggested. Kodak had a couple of very informative guides and exposure wheels that I also used. Then I read or studied for a while and gave him the print when I had consumed enough time that he felt I followed his lead in producing superior work.
I was hired for a semester, but I had interviewed for a photo job with the Dept of the Army a couple of months after I started. They wanted me to start right away, but I had to give the school two weeks notice. The guy with the Masters was taken aback. "You are going to a job that pays as much as I'm getting, that can't be right."
Daytona State College still teaches photography, the credit is transferred to the University of Central Florida where they offer a B. S. degree and a MFA in Digital media.


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Alveric
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Jan 04, 2015 20:17 |  #12

watt100 wrote in post #17365929external link
graduate degrees in photography? kinda like getting a PhD in plumbing

I'm with you there. Having taken a gander at the curricula of some schools and considering the current state of 'academics', the only thing one of these degrees are good for is lining some school's pockets.


'The success of the second-rate is deplorable in itself; but it is more deplorable in that it very often obscures the genuine masterpiece. If the crowd runs after the false, it must neglect the true.' —Arthur Machen
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airfrogusmc
I'm a chimper. There I said it...
Joined May 2007
Oak Park, Illinois
Post has been edited over 2 years ago by airfrogusmc.
Jan 04, 2015 20:48 |  #13

Well, there is a long list of great photographers that were well educated and many of those also taught photography on the college level.

A graduate degree in art or photography is really for self growth as an artist and should be approached as such.




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BigAl007
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Joined Dec 2010
Repps cum Bastwick, Gt Yarmouth, Norfolk, UK.
Jan 05, 2015 05:22 |  #14

I would love to be able to take a graduate degree in photography. There are so many things about photography that I would love to lean about in a formal setting. Composition and colour being two of them, that I feel particularly weak on. The fact is that a good undergraduate degree course will be structured to offer a full range of course units across the whole field of photography, you are thus pushed to lean stuff that otherwise you would not normally bother with.

The other advantage of a formal setting is that the institution offering it will be able to offer you access to equipment that might otherwise not be available to you to simply have a try with. Add to that the feedback of faculty that are hopefully doing some level of research on top of teaching undergrads.

Unfortunately my health would preclude going back to full time education at higher level, even if I could fund it. I was lucky to get through my undergrad degree in Electronic Engineering, having been diagnosed with M.E. three months into my first year of the course. I was a mature student after spending nine years in the RAF as an Air Defence Radar Technician.

Alan


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AlFooteIII
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Joined Jul 2013
New York City
Jan 05, 2015 06:50 |  #15

airfrogusmc wrote in post #17366468external link
Well, there is a long list of great photographers that were well educated and many of those also taught photography on the college level.

A graduate degree in art or photography is really for self growth as an artist and should be approached as such.

It's also a necessity for jobs in academia, museums or high-end galleries, and the like. Much like other fine arts degrees, it won't make you a better artist, but it will give you exposure (pardon the pun) to ideas and concepts you might not find on your own which would help you to teach others.


Specializing in Theatrical Photography. See my work at:
www.alfoote3photograph​y.com/external link
www.facebook.com/alfoo​te3photographyexternal link

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