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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk
Thread started 15 Nov 2015 (Sunday) 12:57
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How to minimize glare and reflections inside a museum?

 
Perfectly ­ Frank
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Joined Oct 2010
Nov 15, 2015 12:57 |  #1

When it's allowed, I like to photograph museum exhibits. My favorite gear is the Canon 6D and 24-70 f2.8 II lens. I never use flash.
The problem I encounter is the glare and reflections due to the exhibits being housed in glass enclosures. I try to position myself to
reduce the reflections, but I still get them.

Another problem is the museum lighting. One museum I visit often use a large number of miniature floodlights mounted on the ceiling.
This shows up as small spots of light on my photos.

Any suggestions on minimizing these unwanted artifacts? Perhaps a lens filter? Post processing techniques?

Here's two examples. Note the reflections and spots of light...

Willie Mays jersey

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Babe Ruth's pants


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Jon
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Nov 15, 2015 18:19 |  #2

Depending on how deep the cases are, getting up close to the case, with a rubber lens hood to shield the glass, can help. Circular polarizers can also help reduce reflections. If you're with someone else, you might see if they'll hold something up to help block the lights, but then you risk cutting the light on the subject too far.


Jon
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MalVeauX
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Nov 15, 2015 18:21 |  #3

Heya,

Unfortunately there's no real easy way to do it other than position and playing with angles.

I'm not sure a CPL would eliminate all of it either, but it could help in some cases.

Very best,


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DisrupTer911
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Nov 16, 2015 15:59 |  #4

Rubber lens hood and wide angel pressed against the glass or a CPL


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vraspagraphix
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Nov 17, 2015 11:49 as a reply to DisrupTer911's post |  #5

It's obvious that you could not use the camera against the glass and a rubber lens hood isn't going to make any difference. The reflections are not coming from the front element surface of your lens which is the purpose of a lens hood. A polarizer will help with the secondary reflections but not the direct reflection of light sources. Moving around a little may help in some cases but when you move the lens off axis to the subject you are going to get some shape distortions. The only real way to deal with this problem is with a shift lens on a view camera. Not really practical for your situation.




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Jon
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Nov 17, 2015 13:42 as a reply to vraspagraphix's post |  #6

A rubber lens hood pressed against the glass will, in some cases, allow you to block the outside light from the part of the museum case you're shooting through. In the two specific photos that OP posted, it probably wouldn't help much but in other cases, where there's a deeper case or smaller object, it can be a real boon, especially since the flexible hood allows you to shoot obliquely, while a regular hard lens hood would pretty much constrain you to shooting straight through the glass.


Jon
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number ­ six
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Nov 17, 2015 15:02 |  #7

Notice that the reflections in the jersey shot are all at the top 1/4 of the image because the lights are overhead.

OK, why not raise the camera position until the reflections are above the top of the desired image? You'll have keystone effect, of course, but you can correct that in PP.

-js


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BlakeC
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Nov 17, 2015 15:08 |  #8

I have had to take photos of framed photos at events before. I found shooting at an angle worked best. Just move around until you find the angle that works for your situation to cut out certain objects in the reflection or reflected lights.

Honestly, I wouldn't even bother taking photos at a museum unless it is of me/my family in the photo next to an object. You are going to the museum to see the items in person. Not to see them through a lens or to look at the photos later. If you want to look at photos of museum objects, just google them. You will find much better photos online.


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Perfectly ­ Frank
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Nov 18, 2015 10:06 |  #9

BlakeC wrote in post #17787519 (external link)
Honestly, I wouldn't even bother taking photos at a museum unless it is of me/my family in the photo next to an object. You are going to the museum to see the items in person. Not to see them through a lens or to look at the photos later.

I like looking at them later.


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TooManyShots
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Nov 18, 2015 15:10 |  #10

Wow, you would need a window size hood to cover that large glass encasing..hehehehehheh​ehe..... Frankly, your only viable and realistic option is to shoot it at different angles.....move around and see if you can still see the background reflection. If not....well, that's the nature of the beast. And just live with it...


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farmer1957
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nevada
Nov 24, 2015 01:07 as a reply to Perfectly Frank's post |  #11

Reflection
I will do my best to explain.
What causes Electromagnetic polarized waves ( EPW ) aka reflection or other words known as glare.

EPW can be emitted by some sources of light like florescent lighting.
It is said that the suns light doesn't contain or emit EPW in its light.
EPW are kind of like a hitch hiker once the light has been.
Reflected , refracted or scattered the light then has electromagnetic polarized waves attached to it.
So if the suns light passes through ( ENOUGH ) space dust its been scattered and or reflected and will be polarized.
Nice bright sunny day at the lake and the suns reflection blinds you off the smooth surface of the water.
So you wear polarized sun glasses

When light that contains EPW strike or come in contact ALL non metallic smooth surfaces it creates electromagnetic reflection. AKA ( Glare )


The lights in the museum most likely is being reflected down and possible the lighting in is also softened ( scattered and reflected ).

So all the lighting in the museum contains EPW and even if you held up a panel that had linear polarized film stretch across the panel so the light striking the base ball shirt has been linear polarized
and used a CPL on your lens which is called the cross polarization technic .
its not going to do you any good because the glass is refracting the light and cause all the light to be polarized and there for you will never be able to fully control the reflection issues you have.
Your only hope is getting the right angle so you are not dealing with a direct angle of light or reflection.
And use a CPL on your lens .




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BigAl007
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Joined Dec 2010
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Nov 24, 2015 12:02 |  #12

farmer1957 wrote in post #17794817 (external link)
Reflection
I will do my best to explain.
What causes Electromagnetic polarized waves ( EPW ) aka reflection or other words known as glare.

EPW can be emitted by some sources of light like florescent lighting.
It is said that the suns light doesn't contain or emit EPW in its light.
EPW are kind of like a hitch hiker once the light has been.
Reflected , refracted or scattered the light then has electromagnetic polarized waves attached to it.
So if the suns light passes through ( ENOUGH ) space dust its been scattered and or reflected and will be polarized.
Nice bright sunny day at the lake and the suns reflection blinds you off the smooth surface of the water.
So you wear polarized sun glasses

When light that contains EPW strike or come in contact ALL non metallic smooth surfaces it creates electromagnetic reflection. AKA ( Glare )


The lights in the museum most likely is being reflected down and possible the lighting in is also softened ( scattered and reflected ).

So all the lighting in the museum contains EPW and even if you held up a panel that had linear polarized film stretch across the panel so the light striking the base ball shirt has been linear polarized
and used a CPL on your lens which is called the cross polarization technic .
its not going to do you any good because the glass is refracting the light and cause all the light to be polarized and there for you will never be able to fully control the reflection issues you have.
Your only hope is getting the right angle so you are not dealing with a direct angle of light or reflection.
And use a CPL on your lens .

I'm sorry to say this, but this is complete gibberish, and in no way provides an explanation of polarized waves. Unfortunately I have to apologise that due to my current state of health producing a good eplanation is not going to be possible.

Alan


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farmer1957
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nevada
Nov 25, 2015 12:21 as a reply to BigAl007's post |  #13

https://www.boundless.​com ...-and-reflecting-643-6054/ (external link)




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farmer1957
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nevada
Nov 25, 2015 12:55 as a reply to BigAl007's post |  #14

Hi Alan if you want to jump in, Jump in with both feet.
If you wish to educate anyone then do it.

Just how hard is it for you to post links on polarization ?
About as hard it is for you to write the word jibberish ...............




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sharod
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Greencastle, PA
Nov 26, 2015 05:42 |  #15

OP, I too struggle with window reflections. I just shot a few of a storefront. I have no real issues with reflections on the front glass, my reflections come from glass behind the display. This art studio is downtown and on a main street with buildings across the street. I use a CPL on my lens. I just do my best to get the best angle to get the least amount of reflections possible. I have tried pretty much every angle, there's no getting rid of them all. If anyone has any other suggestions, I always welcome them.

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[IMAGE'S LINK: https://flic.kr/p/ApGz​Xd] (external link)Art studio front window (external link) by SHARON OBERHOLZER (external link), on Flickr

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How to minimize glare and reflections inside a museum?
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