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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Transportation Talk
Thread started 20 Nov 2015 (Friday) 16:14
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Aviation Bucket List ideas.

 
graham121
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Pakenham, VIC, Aus
Aug 14, 2016 08:50 |  #16

I will did that I went over to the UK in July and attended RIAT Fairford, Duxford Flying Legends and Farnborough. Of the three Farnborough was the only one that was really Neutered by the CAA changes - so much so that Sally B the B-17 was limited to a take off, turn right way from the crowd, downwind leg and then land. The Red Arrows were also,limited to a fly past, much to the chagrin of many of the locals who really missed their display!!!

duxford made some changes to the crowd line which meant a small number were not as close to the flight line but overall more people were.

What does seem to be the case is that some of the smaller shows are being impacted more as they do not have the space to comply with the revised requirements...hopeful​ly sanity will prevail and if not next season then the season after things will head back towards the way they were.


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BigAl007
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Cream of the Crop
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Repps cum Bastwick, Gt Yarmouth, Norfolk, UK.
Aug 14, 2016 17:40 as a reply to graham121's post |  #17

We can only hope things get better, they way that CAA have reacted almost seems as if they want to destroy the British airshow industry. I have to say that it looks like you missed one of the very best shows while you were over here. I would have really recommended fitting in the Shuttleworth show at Old Warden too. The July one has always been the big Military Pageant, One of the best days of the year. It is one of the smaller venues, but if you like vintage and veteran aircraft, along with some classics, through to about 1950, it's probably the best place on earth to visit. It's not number two on my list for nothing. Actually it probably should be my number one, I just gave the Wright Flyer the nod though.

Alan


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graham121
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Pakenham, VIC, Aus
Aug 15, 2016 04:08 as a reply to BigAl007's post |  #18

I arrived on July 5 which was a couple of days after it was held. Maybe in another 4 years or so?


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BigAl007
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Aug 15, 2016 04:54 |  #19

graham121 wrote in post #18095845 (external link)
I arrived on July 5 which was a couple of days after it was held. Maybe in another 4 years or so?

Hopefully, although small is size, it is exceptional in quality. I would love to go over to the US for some of your big shows, unfortunately, short of wining the lottery, which I don't play, I doubt I will ever be able to afford to visit the US again. I did enjoy my two week in Florida, it hardly seems like twenty years ago though. As well as the theme parks I did get to spend one day at KSC, but missed out on seeing a launch.

Alan


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graham121
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Post has been edited over 1 year ago by graham121.
Aug 15, 2016 05:53 as a reply to BigAl007's post |  #20

I'd love to do some of the big US shows including Oshkosh but for now I'll have to stick to the local Australian ones. though a trip over the Tasman to Wings over Wanaka would not be overly expensive.


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BigAl007
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Aug 15, 2016 07:21 as a reply to graham121's post |  #21

Sorry Graham, for some reason I thought you were from the US. Aus and NZ are the other two places in the world that I would really like to visit. I know that in the past Aeroplane (previously known as Aeroplane Monthly) Magazine ran group package tours to Aus that included one or two of the big antipodean shows. They weren't cheap though, IIRC well over £2000 each, which as a person on disability is pretty unlikely to happen. Still one can but hope.

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seaninsa
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Aug 16, 2016 14:51 as a reply to post 17793808 |  #22

The Planes of Fame airshow is awesome. One year I believe it had 7 of the eight flying P38s in the world. Here is a collection of my photos from various POF airshows:

http://www.seansydnorp​hotography.com/f534757​944 (external link)




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Perfectly ­ Frank
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Joined Oct 2010
Aug 19, 2016 09:57 |  #23

seaninsa wrote in post #18097428 (external link)
The Planes of Fame airshow is awesome. One year I believe it had 7 of the eight flying P38s in the world. Here is a collection of my photos from various POF airshows:

http://www.seansydnorp​hotography.com/f534757​944 (external link)

It's probably one of the best warbird shows in the US.
Nice collection of photos, the flying wing is my favorite.


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Perfectly ­ Frank
I'm too sexy for my lens
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Nov 19, 2017 16:19 |  #24

Some what related, here's an article on the best aviation museums in the world.

http://www.cnn.com ...iation-museums/index.html (external link)


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BigAl007
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Jan 08, 2018 10:25 |  #25

Perfectly Frank wrote in post #18499950 (external link)
Some what related, here's an article on the best aviation museums in the world.

http://www.cnn.com ...iation-museums/index.html (external link)


Frank I was just rereading the linked article and had to laugh. The entry on the Ukrainian museum has a spokesperson, a Professor at the attached university no less, stating that it held the world's first jetliner a Tu 104, that made the world's first passenger flight in September 1956. An amazing achievement, but I think deHavilland might be wondering in that case what the DH104 Comet, that had already been in service for two years by then, was powered by.

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Perfectly ­ Frank
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Jan 16, 2018 23:34 |  #26

Good point, Al.

I hope he isn't a history professor! ;-)a


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Tom ­ Reichner
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Jan 17, 2018 00:26 |  #27

I'm not an aviation photographer, but if I were, I can't help but to think of one image-making opportunity that I would love to have:

An air-to-air opportunity where the plane that I am photographing is an old biplane, and Mount Everest is clearly visible in the background.

I realize that there might be altitude constraints that would need to be addressed, as I am not sure just how high those old biplanes are able to fly. . But even if it could only get up to 16,000 or 18,000 feet, I'm sure that the shot that I envision would be able to be staged in a way that would give me the look that I would want. . But of course, much higher altitude would be preferable.

............... ............... ............... ............... ............... ............... ............... ............... ...............

Another bucket-list idea that would be much more feasible:

A low-altitude air-to-air opportunity in which the plane that I photograph would be an old floatplane or amphibious aircraft, and it would be flying over icebergs in the Arctic Ocean. . I'd prefer the western hemisphere, especially off of the Alaskan coast. . If somewhere in the sea down below, there were a hunting party of eskimos in sea kayaks, that would be a great bonus!

I'd prefer that the plane and the overall motif of this image be circa 1930s through early 1950s.

I doubt that I'll ever do anything like this kind of photography, as I am a wildlife photographer and spend all of my resources setting up wildlife photo opportunities. . But I love to dream up different types of images, and when I saw the words "bucket list" and "ideas", I couldn't help but to want to contribute!


.


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "moot point", NOT "mute point".

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BigAl007
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Jan 17, 2018 08:12 |  #28

Tom Reichner wrote in post #18542767 (external link)
I'm not an aviation photographer, but if I were, I can't help but to think of one image-making opportunity that I would love to have:

An air-to-air opportunity where the plane that I am photographing is an old biplane, and Mount Everest is clearly visible in the background.

I realize that there might be altitude constraints that would need to be addressed, as I am not sure just how high those old biplanes are able to fly. . But even if it could only get up to 16,000 or 18,000 feet, I'm sure that the shot that I envision would be able to be staged in a way that would give me the look that I would want. . But of course, much higher altitude would be preferable.

............... ............... ............... ............... ............... ............... ............... ............... ...............

Another bucket-list idea that would be much more feasible:

A low-altitude air-to-air opportunity in which the plane that I photograph would be an old floatplane or amphibious aircraft, and it would be flying over icebergs in the Arctic Ocean. . I'd prefer the western hemisphere, especially off of the Alaskan coast. . If somewhere in the sea down below, there were a hunting party of eskimos in sea kayaks, that would be a great bonus!

I'd prefer that the plane and the overall motif of this image be circa 1930s through early 1950s.

I doubt that I'll ever do anything like this kind of photography, as I am a wildlife photographer and spend all of my resources setting up wildlife photo opportunities. . But I love to dream up different types of images, and when I saw the words "bucket list" and "ideas", I couldn't help but to want to contribute!


.


Your first choice would be a non starter I'm afraid. The first flight over Mount Everest was in 1933 and was performed by the prototype Westland Wallace PV6, which had been significantly modified for the task. It was accompanied by a similarly modified Westland PV3, another Westland prototype developed from the earlier Wapiti, as was the PV6, but in this case as a torpedo bomber. The PV3 didn't enter service as a production type, although the PV6 did. Both of these aircraft were biplanes, and used highly supercharged Bristol Pegasus IS3 radial engines for the expedition.

As far as I know there is only one partly preserved Wallace left, it's on show at the RAF Museum Hendon. The Wallace was initially used as a general purpose Army cooperation aircraft, and saw front line service from 31 to 36, with Royal Auxiliary Air Force Squadrons. It flew with No's 501 to 504 Squadrons. After it was relegated from front line service it remained in service as a radio communications trainer and as a target tug, serving in those capacities until 1943.

The Wallace on display at Hendon was at one time operated by Electrical and Wireless School, which became No1 Electrical and Wireless School, and later still No1 Radio School. I did my RAF trade training at No1 Radio School, then at RAF Locking, just across the road from one of Westland's factories. The Hendon Wallace was displayed with the covering removed from one side, so that you can see the structure, and is unfortunately without a set of wings.

IMAGE: https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3812/9515941755_6686efd3ae_o.jpg
[IMAGE'S LINK: https://flic.kr/p/fuTF​Xi] (external link)Westland Wallace Mk II (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

I doubt if any other biplane has ever flown over Everest, since the 33 expedition was getting towards the end of the biplane era. Although the altitude record was over 40000' by 1933 it is the combination of difficult terrain, Everest is pretty remote for an aircraft that is doing about 100 mph that limited visiting it. There is nothing in the way of pre war biplanes that will make it up to 30000' left flying. The worlds largest single engined biplane might manage it, but the Antonov An2 isn't exactly your traditional biplane.

IMAGE: https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8532/8644579794_e9cb3bd722_o.jpg
[IMAGE'S LINK: https://flic.kr/p/eaTJ​pd] (external link)Antonov An2 (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

Your second option should be much easier to organise, there are still lots of DHC 2 Beavers about, and most of those are on floats, and working in the Canadian and Alaskan north. The Beaver dates to 1946 as a design, so fall pretty well in your time frame. Pre-war types again would be harder, if you want smaller aircraft. I know the are a few PBY Catalinas still about, and I think you might find one DC3 on floats up north somewhere. I recently saw a video on Youtube of the DC3 flying on floats, but I think it was a few years old.

Here's a Beaver on wheels.

IMAGE: https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1474/25885250142_91a2ddb497_o.jpg
[IMAGE'S LINK: https://flic.kr/p/FroF​3f] (external link)de Havilland (Canada) DHC-2 Beaver (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

Alan

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