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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Architecture, Real-Estate & Buildings Talk
Thread started 15 Apr 2016 (Friday) 14:09
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Need help deciding my next lens for real estate

 
andrewliu
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Joined Jan 2012
Post has been edited over 1 year ago by andrewliu.
Apr 15, 2016 14:09 |  #1

I just got a rokinon 12mm fisheye for my canon 5d Mark ii. So far this lens has been super fun, but now I'm thinking of getting a wide angle to do some real estate photography. I'm no pro or anything but wanted to see if I can make a little cash to compensate the purchase of a lens. I was thinking of getting a sigma 24-105 art series lens. I've heard great things about it. I was just curious to know if this is a wide enough angle for the full frame camera? I don't want to spent a ton of money on a lens. Any suggestions? I've done some research and a lot of lens that I've read online are referring to lens that is capable to only a crop sensor like the canon 10-18mm or 10-22mm. Need some feedback and suggestions! The sigma 24-105 is also good for the overall walk around lens. I eventually want to get a 70-200 f4 in the future to shoot surfing.

Thanks for the help!

EDIT: I realized that this might be in the wrong section. If so, can the moderator please move this to the correct section?

Thanks!




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cccc
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Apr 15, 2016 18:48 |  #2

For a 5D you'll want to start with something like a 17-40mm or a 16-35mm (any of versions will work)




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Snydremark
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Apr 15, 2016 19:10 |  #3

Look into 24 and 17mm TS lenses if you're going for real estate. They make dealing with verticals (which will be a big thing for you) *much* easier. You can go straight Wide/UWA but you wind up with a fair bit of distortion to the internals/externals of buildings that is not desirable for RE shots.


- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS)
"The easiest way to improve your photos is to adjust the loose nut between the shutter release and the ground."

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andrewliu
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Apr 15, 2016 19:34 as a reply to Snydremark's post |  #4

The tilt shift lens are way too expensive for right now, as I'm just starting to get back into photography. I would also like to know how other people got started, or what lens they started off with?




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Phoenixkh
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Joined May 2011
Gainesville, Florida
Apr 15, 2016 19:41 |  #5

andrewliu wrote in post #17973219 (external link)
The tilt shift lens are way too expensive for right now, as I'm just starting to get back into photography. I would also like to know how other people got started, or what lens they started off with?

We use the 16-35 f/4 IS for my wife's kitchens.

Yes, there is some distortion but I've found that Lightroom corrects it pretty easily..... perhaps not a tilt/shift lens level, but good enough for our uses.


Kim (the male variety) Canon 1D IV | 6Dc | 16-35 f/4 IS | 24-105 f/4 IS |100L IS macro | 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II | 100-400Lii | 50 f/1.8 STM | Canon 1.4X III
RRS tripod and monopod | 580EXII | Cinch 1 & Loop 3 Special Edition

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cccc
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Post has been edited over 1 year ago by cccc.
Apr 15, 2016 19:52 |  #6

Most of the shots on my website were taken without a tilt shift lens. Check it out.

www.daviesimaging.com (external link)

Edit: just looked through my website and 90% of those images are from a 17-40mm.




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Wilt
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Post has been last edited over 1 year ago by Wilt. 5 edits done in total.
Apr 15, 2016 20:26 |  #7

If you shoot without a shift-capable lens, you can use postprocessing software to correct the converging vertical lines. Be aware, however, that you may introduce apparent aspect ratio error by doing so. I just photographed a nice square piece of paper on a rule background (paper cutter). (Think of the paper as a 8' x 8' wall being photographed when your camera and lens is not perfectly level to the ground)

The first shot is as taken in the camera and imported into Lightroom.

IMAGE: http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i63/wiltonw/Principles/IMG_9985_zpsn0tqepa7.jpg

Then I used Paintshop Pro and its Perspective Correction feature to straighten the converging verticals.

IMAGE: http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i63/wiltonw/Principles/IMG_9985%20perspective_zpszbrjwnhu.jpg

Note that the paper in the photo now looks like its inherent square shape
But not that the photo is no longer 1.5:1 in aspect ratio. It only frames a 11:9.5 area, although the square item in the photo looks correct!

The corrected perspective also reveals the importance of your lens selection, to try to avoid pincushion distortion commonly seen in zooms at the WA portion of their FL range. In this case, I shot with a Tamron 28-75mm lens at 28mm f/5.6. I know better than to use this lens for real estate if there are strong visual lines! (I do have a 24mm Perspective Correction lens from Olympus, which I use on an adapter when shooting with Canon dSLR body.)

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andrewliu
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Post has been last edited over 1 year ago by andrewliu. 2 edits done in total.
Apr 16, 2016 03:12 as a reply to cccc's post |  #8

Your photos are amazing! 17-40mm huh? I guess I'll have to look into this one! Also, what about the 17-55mm one? I read a review that this is sharper than the 17-40.

Edit: just did some more digging on 17-55 and found out that it's not compatible with the 5DMKII




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andrewliu
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Apr 16, 2016 03:13 as a reply to Wilt's post |  #9

Wow! Thank you so much for explaining this to me. Is paintshop pro a must have tool? I have lightroom and photoshop, but I'm not a pro at any of those programs. I definitely want to start learning more though.




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Wilt
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Apr 16, 2016 09:04 |  #10

andrewliu wrote in post #17973488 (external link)
Wow! Thank you so much for explaining this to me. Is paintshop pro a must have tool? I have lightroom and photoshop, but I'm not a pro at any of those programs. I definitely want to start learning more though.

I used Paintshop Pro simply because I have not upgraded my computer to the Lightroom 5. LR5 has the Upright tool (in lens corrections) and can resolve converging verticals. I mentioned apparent distortions caused in the correction of converging verticals because it is a generic result, not unique to the software I used, but is something that even Adobe points out in its video tutorials. Adobe has a variety of options in LR that you can turn on/off to address different forms of resultant distortions, some of which are designed to 'make the photo more pleasing to the eye' but in itself can allow varying degrees of distortions to exist in the correction process. If I had an active business in real estate photography, I certainly would have upgraded my computer software long ago, to use perspective correction in LR6 (and later).


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Wilt
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Post has been last edited over 1 year ago by Wilt. 3 edits done in total.
Apr 16, 2016 09:17 |  #11

Here's a link to two posts I did about Perspective Control lenses and choice of FL, and the use of reaaally wide angle for real estate photography earlier this year.

http://photography-on-the.net ...showthread.php?p=17​845959

http://photography-on-the.net ...showthread.php?p=17​845997

And pertinent to OP question, what an architectural photographer recenty added to that thread as comments:

"I'm an architectural photographer based in Washington, D.C. I shoot condos, office buildings and rental properties for marketing in print and on the web. I use the Canon and Schneider tilt/shift lenses. The lens you would use the most for interiors is the 24MM TS-E II. It's not too often but for tighter spots I use the 17MM TS-E. If you were to buy just one lens, I'd recommend the 24 TS-E II (the original 24 TSE was soft). If you are shooting for money and can afford it, the 17MM can be handy to have. I also use two Schneider TS lenses, the 50 and 90MM, but those are reserved more for exterior elevation shots from a distance or detail work."


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andrewliu
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Apr 17, 2016 01:54 |  #12

Thanks for the tips!

But I opted to go for the Canon 16-35mm f4!!! Heard realy good reviews about it. I still can't afford the tilt shift, so hopefully this lens will be enough!




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photoperson
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Apr 18, 2016 08:23 as a reply to andrewliu's post |  #13

We do a lot of architecture, and I agree with the architectural photographer that the 24mm TS-E is the most used.

However, for Real Estate, it seems that the exaggerated space of a very (17mm) wide angle makes the places look bigger, which seems to be the preference in real estate.




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Wilt
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Apr 18, 2016 08:49 |  #14

photoperson wrote in post #17975958 (external link)
We do a lot of architecture, and I agree with the architectural photographer that the 24mm TS-E is the most used.

However, for Real Estate, it seems that the exaggerated space of a very (17mm) wide angle makes the places look bigger, which seems to be the preference in real estate.

Yes, just as I related in my first link in Post #11 !
Quite a change in attitude compared to what was expressed by a real estate agent decades ago...no longer 'truth in advertising', they now simply want to lure you in! I wonder what the BROKERS currently think about this point, compared to the 'used car salesmen' agents.


You need to give me OK to edit your image and repost! Keep POTN alive and well with member support http://photography-on-the.net/forum/donate.p​hp
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farmer1957
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nevada
Apr 20, 2016 19:49 |  #15

TSE 17mm TSE 24mm 5Dmk II or III CPL for the lenses
Tripod, ball head. Light.




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