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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Architecture, Real-Estate & Buildings Talk
Thread started 15 Apr 2016 (Friday) 14:09
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Need help deciding my next lens for real estate

 
HelplessSEAL
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Joined Jun 2012
Post has been edited over 1 year ago by HelplessSEAL with reason 'added some examples'.
May 02, 2016 10:50 as a reply to post 17973219 |  #16

The tilt shift lens are way too expensive for right now, as I'm just starting to get back into photography. I would also like to know how other people got started, or what lens they started off with?

I used to have a 1st edition 24mm TS-e that nowadays can often be had for just under $700 on ebay in decent condition. It's still a stellar performer, you just have to deal with more vignetting and CA at extreme shifts, both correctable in post if you have the patience. Distortion is also pretty well controlled in the lens. Having shot both the mark I and mark II, I can say that there is a difference in sharpness, but not noticeable until you go past 100% crops. My only major gripe is that the SOOC colors from the original lens can be... how can I put it... somewhat dated? It's hard to explain, it's like the colors in old architecture photos of the 80s shot with something like Velvia slide film, but I manage to use it successfully for shots like below.

If you can swing for a mark II 24mm TS-e though... It's quite an upgrade =)


Here's a link to one on fleabay:
http://www.ebay.com ...7b22ba:g:o6YAAOSw3m​pXH7JA (external link)

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Epic battle in my mind of whether to focus more on portraiture or architecture. #FirstWorldProblems :roll:

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Tareq
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Jun 05, 2016 01:23 |  #17

If you can't buy Canon TS lenses, there is always that Samyang/Rokinon 24 TS lens, it may not be in same quality range, but something is better than nothing, it may help you understanding more about TS lenses, and i don't think it will be that bad sharpness, it is prime and with TS you can get more DoF as feature of TS anyway.


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HelplessSEAL
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Post has been edited over 1 year ago by HelplessSEAL.
Jun 30, 2016 01:46 |  #18

Tareq wrote in post #18029552 (external link)
If you can't buy Canon TS lenses, there is always that Samyang/Rokinon 24 TS lens, it may not be in same quality range, but something is better than nothing, it may help you understanding more about TS lenses, and i don't think it will be that bad sharpness, it is prime and with TS you can get more DoF as feature of TS anyway.

Samyang 24mm TS is a good choice for decent sharpness, but the distortion is a real dealbreaker, and almost impossible to fix at significant shifts, not to mention that the original Canon 24mm TS-e is built like an absolute tank. For the money, I'd still go with the old Canon


Epic battle in my mind of whether to focus more on portraiture or architecture. #FirstWorldProblems :roll:

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TCampbell
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Jun 30, 2016 09:33 as a reply to post 17973264 |  #19

I realize the thread is a few months old, but one point I often make (and your diagram of the sheets of paper over grid lines demonstrates well) is that if the camera body and lens are "level" with respect to the floor then the vertical structures on a building or inside a room (doors, windows, walls, etc.) won't "lean". In other words you won't have to correct anything (and when you correct in software you have to shoot particular wide to compensate for the fact that once the software corrects the image the result is a "keystone" shape which has to be cropped back to a rectangle again -- so you lose part of the image.

Even with a tilt-shift, using the shift correction, the camera body has to be "level" with respect to the floor or ground... it's just that as the lens is "shifted" the camera gets an angle looking up or down (or sideways depending on how you rotate the lens) that still maintains perspective.

Sometimes your best angle to a room won't necessary allow you to keep the camera and lens "level" and you'll have to fix it in software. But if you *can* keep it level, you'll have less work to do later and you won't have to worry that you'll crop out parts of the image that you wanted to include.




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farmer1957
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nevada
Post has been edited over 1 year ago by farmer1957.
Jul 01, 2016 01:36 as a reply to TCampbell's post |  #20

Sometimes your best angle to a room won't necessary allow you to keep the camera and lens "level" and you'll have to fix it in software. But if you *can* keep it level, you'll have less work to do later and you won't have to worry that you'll crop out parts of the image that you wanted to include.[/QUOTE]


With a TSE 17mm on a level full framed body how can you not get the angle ?
With the tilt and shift and the wide FOV ,,




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TCampbell
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Joined Apr 2012
Jul 01, 2016 17:53 |  #21

farmer1957 wrote in post #18054874 (external link)
With a TSE 17mm on a level full framed body how can you not get the angle ?
With the tilt and shift and the wide FOV ,,

I was referring to using normal (non TS) lenses. With a tilt-shift you can always get the angle you want... that's part of the point of owning one of those lenses.

The wider the lens, the more sensitive it is to the verticals being distorted by a non-level camera. When I use my 14mm lens I have to be especially careful.




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Tareq
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Jul 01, 2016 21:34 |  #22

And it is a fun to use TS lenses, i have Samyang 14mm and Sigma 12-24 and recently bought 15-30 to replace my Canon 16-35 mk1, but i can't stop using those TS lenses, both of them for different applications indoor or outdoor.


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Need help deciding my next lens for real estate
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