Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Read More.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Motorsports Talk
Thread started 25 Sep 2016 (Sunday) 10:05
Prev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as registered member)

7D Focus points - best to use for moving targets ?

 
boghopper
Junior Member
27 posts
Joined Nov 2012
Sep 25, 2016 10:05 |  #1

Was just wondering what everyone uses for shooting moving targets - car, aircraft etc... with. I usually use Manual Select with AF point extension but was wondering if this is the best or is it better to use another of the AF modes to get sharper images ?




LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as registered member)
Jethr0
Senior Member
Jethr0's Avatar
Joined Aug 2012
ON, Canada
Sep 25, 2016 10:22 |  #2

Are you using AI Servo?


www.jefflowe.ca (external link)
Instagram: https://www.instagram.​com/jefflowe.ca (external link)

LOG IN TO REPLY
boghopper
THREAD ­ STARTER
Junior Member
27 posts
Joined Nov 2012
Sep 25, 2016 10:31 as a reply to Jethr0's post |  #3

Yes all the time.... Usually use the AF Manual Select with point extension and change it about to suit car and direction of travel etc..... but was wondering if that was optimum or is Manual Select Zone AF appropriate ?




LOG IN TO REPLY
Jethr0
Senior Member
Jethr0's Avatar
Joined Aug 2012
ON, Canada
Post has been edited over 1 year ago by Jethr0.
Sep 25, 2016 10:41 |  #4

Edit: I double checked my 7d and I'm using the same AF settings as yourself.

Post up some examples of pics that depict the sharpness issue you referred to.


www.jefflowe.ca (external link)
Instagram: https://www.instagram.​com/jefflowe.ca (external link)

LOG IN TO REPLY
boghopper
THREAD ­ STARTER
Junior Member
27 posts
Joined Nov 2012
Sep 25, 2016 11:08 as a reply to Jethr0's post |  #5

No real issues - just wondering if there was an optimum point.....




LOG IN TO REPLY
Jethr0
Senior Member
Jethr0's Avatar
Joined Aug 2012
ON, Canada
Sep 25, 2016 11:25 |  #6

I think the key for cars is the AF expansion. I tried a number of variations but found I got good results with that.
Along with that I use shutter priority and usually ISO @ 100.


www.jefflowe.ca (external link)
Instagram: https://www.instagram.​com/jefflowe.ca (external link)

LOG IN TO REPLY
boghopper
THREAD ­ STARTER
Junior Member
27 posts
Joined Nov 2012
Sep 25, 2016 12:28 as a reply to Jethr0's post |  #7

Yeah same here - iso as low as possible, tv mode and af extension but as ever - always trying to improve ! Never tried back button focusing - is it any benefit ? Thanks for you're advice and assistance though




LOG IN TO REPLY
Jethr0
Senior Member
Jethr0's Avatar
Joined Aug 2012
ON, Canada
Sep 25, 2016 12:44 |  #8

I recently started using back button focus. I'm taking shorter bursts of shots through the panning sweep. It took a bit of practice but it's working well for me lately.

Give it a shot!


www.jefflowe.ca (external link)
Instagram: https://www.instagram.​com/jefflowe.ca (external link)

LOG IN TO REPLY
GregDunn
Goldmember
GregDunn's Avatar
1,280 posts
Joined Mar 2013
Indiana
Sep 27, 2016 12:05 |  #9

If you're tracking moving targets which are difficult to keep framed, back button focus is a huge help. It's very hard keep the shutter release partially depressed while trying to keep the subject centered. Also, if you have a problem with objects moving between you and the intended subject, using BBF lets you "breathe" the AF-ON status to keep the camera from jumping to the intruders.

As for focus points, I've tried everything and ended up defaulting to single point only. The problem with the expansion points is that even though they are only supposed to assist tracking on the center point, any high contrast pattern in the background tends to lure them away. I cannot choose my backgrounds 90% of the time, so minimizing the tracking sensitivity and restricting the camera to a single point gives me the most keepers.

I have tried small zone many times, because it's supposed to bias toward the closest subject, but as often as not the zone is still large enough to allow the peripheral points to grab something I don't want in focus and it's a major pain to keep a close watch on that while framing a fast-moving target. Sometimes it's great, sometimes not so much.

Practice, practice, practice - match your shooting style to the camera by understanding how it works, and adjusting parameters or your style till they meet in the middle.


Canon 1Dx | 5D3 | 7D2 | 6D | 70-200L f/2.8IS | 70-200L f/4 | 24-70L f/2.8 | 24-105L f/4IS | 100-400L f/4.5-5.6IS | 17-55 f/2.8IS | 50 f/1.8 | 28-105 f/3.5-4.5 | 4x Godox AD360

LOG IN TO REPLY
john ­ crossley
Goldmember
john crossley's Avatar
2,033 posts
Joined Nov 2009
The Rhubarb Triangle
Sep 27, 2016 13:57 |  #10

GregDunn wrote in post #18141881 (external link)
If you're tracking moving targets which are difficult to keep framed, back button focus is a huge help. It's very hard keep the shutter release partially depressed while trying to keep the subject centered. Also, if you have a problem with objects moving between you and the intended subject, using BBF lets you "breathe" the AF-ON status to keep the camera from jumping to the intruders.

And it is just as easy to do all of that with the focus operation set to the shutter button.
Whilst BBF does have its' uses it is not the wonderful panacea some people seem to make it out to be.


Those that can, do. Those that can't whinge.

LOG IN TO REPLY
Luckless
Goldmember
3,043 posts
Joined Mar 2012
PEI, Canada
Sep 27, 2016 15:07 |  #11

When dealing with moving subjects that you're trying to keep in focus is to adjust the tracking sensitivity to be lower. I believe it is under CFn III, but I don't have my camera close to hand to double check for sure.

Set it to be slow, so that if you do go off target slightly you have a small delay before the AF jumps in and tries to lock focus onto something else. This can be extremely useful if you're using lenses with long slow focus ranges in environments with lots of contrast. (Tall grass, fences, etc.) It is so easy for the camera to accidentally get locked on to something in the fore or back ground and then say 'hey, I'm in focus, aren't I being helpful?" and then take ages to relock on the thing you actually want. My Sigma 150-500 is terrible for this due to just how out of focus stuff can go. Makes things an interesting challenge however.


Canon EOS 7D | EF 28 f/1.8 | EF 85 f/1.8 | EF 70-200 f/4L | EF-S 17-55 | Sigma 150-500
Flickr: Real-Lucklessexternal link

LOG IN TO REPLY
GregDunn
Goldmember
GregDunn's Avatar
1,280 posts
Joined Mar 2013
Indiana
Sep 28, 2016 23:41 |  #12

john crossley wrote in post #18141953 (external link)
And it is just as easy to do all of that with the focus operation set to the shutter button.

Not for me - believe it or not, each of us is a little different and what may be right for one doesn't work at all for another. And I work with a number of pro photographers who find it much easier to use BBF, so it's rather common.

My whole point was that the photographer needs to find what works for their individual style and not slavishly copy someone else's preferences.


Canon 1Dx | 5D3 | 7D2 | 6D | 70-200L f/2.8IS | 70-200L f/4 | 24-70L f/2.8 | 24-105L f/4IS | 100-400L f/4.5-5.6IS | 17-55 f/2.8IS | 50 f/1.8 | 28-105 f/3.5-4.5 | 4x Godox AD360

LOG IN TO REPLY
john ­ crossley
Goldmember
john crossley's Avatar
2,033 posts
Joined Nov 2009
The Rhubarb Triangle
Sep 29, 2016 07:12 |  #13

You seem to be arguing with yourself here. At first you suggest that people should find their own way of doing things.

GregDunn wrote in post #18143314 (external link)
My whole point was that the photographer needs to find what works for their individual style and not slavishly copy someone else's preferences.

And then you seem to suggest that people should use BBF because you and your mates do.

GregDunn wrote in post #18143314 (external link)
And I work with a number of pro photographers who find it much easier to use BBF, so it's rather common.


Those that can, do. Those that can't whinge.

LOG IN TO REPLY
MalVeauX
"Looks rough and well used"
MalVeauX's Avatar
Joined Feb 2013
Florida
Sep 29, 2016 07:27 |  #14

boghopper wrote in post #18139787 (external link)
Was just wondering what everyone uses for shooting moving targets - car, aircraft etc... with. I usually use Manual Select with AF point extension but was wondering if this is the best or is it better to use another of the AF modes to get sharper images ?

Heya,

I used my 7D with expanded points and used the zone AF, where if you moved the point, it would highlight the zone (center group, left group, right group, top group, bottom group, etc). That's good for large objects that fill your view finder. But I also found it would grab anything under those AF points in the zones when activated. So I slowly moved to single point, manual selection, no expansion, with AI Servo set to low sensitivity, and the tracking I get now is far more accurate, and I get a lock and it stays locked.

There's more to a sharp image however. You could have focus, but have a blurry image due to slow shutter and no stability giving you vibration/shake blur. You'd have to post an example where you think it's not hitting the target.

Very best,


My Flickr (external link) :: My Astrobin (external link)

LOG IN TO REPLY
TeamSpeed
01010100 01010011
TeamSpeed's Avatar
32,241 posts
Gallery: 63 photos
Joined May 2002
Northern Indiana
Post has been edited over 1 year ago by TeamSpeed.
Sep 29, 2016 08:46 |  #15

john crossley wrote in post #18141953 (external link)
And it is just as easy to do all of that with the focus operation set to the shutter button.
Whilst BBF does have its' uses it is not the wonderful panacea some people seem to make it out to be.

For some folks it is indeed the difference between great results vs not so great.

john crossley wrote in post #18143480 (external link)
You seem to be arguing with yourself here. At first you suggest that people should find their own way of doing things.

And then you seem to suggest that people should use BBF because you and your mates do.

And you just suggested above that because perhaps it isn't all that great for you, it must therefore not be great for everyone?

--

Personally I simply won't shoot a Canon without setting it to BBF, period. There is no way I will ever have the AF on the shutter button. That seems to work for a wide variety of shooters here as well, as evidenced by the countless BBF threads we have had over the past decade.


Past Equipment | My Gallery (external link)

LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as registered member)

4,073 views & 6 likes for this thread
7D Focus points - best to use for moving targets ?
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Motorsports Talk


Not a member yet? Click here to register to the forums.
Registered members get all the features: search, following threads, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, settings, view hosted photos, own reviews and more...


AAA

Send feedback to staff    •   Jump to forum...    •   Rules    •   Index    •   New posts    •   RTAT    •   'Best of'    •   Gallery    •   Gear    •   Reviews    •   Polls

COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Privacy policy and cookie usage info.

POWERED BY AMASS 1.4version 1.4
made in Finland
by Pekka Saarinen
for photography-on-the.net
Spent 0.00102 for 4 database queries.
PAGE COMPLETED IN 0.02s
Latest registered member is smurkej
890 guests, 444 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 6106, that happened on Jun 09, 2016