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FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos Video and Sound Editing
Thread started 19 Oct 2016 (Wednesday) 21:12
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Equipment needed to take good quality video on canon 5div

 
bumpintheroad
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Joined Oct 2013
NJ, USA
Nov 07, 2016 01:07 |  #16

Things I would suggest are a decent tripod, Videomic Pro, B+W 77mm variable ND and appropriate step-down rings for each of your lenses, a CN-160 video light with a few batteries, and a double shoe v-bracket (to mount both the light and mic on your camera at the same time). That should cover all your bases for now. You can always add other kit as you grow more experienced enough to decide for yourself what else is needed.


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artsf
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Joined Sep 2015
Post has been last edited 4 months ago by artsf. 5 edits done in total.
Jul 12, 2017 21:44 |  #17

great thread. I must say that I never liked shooting video with a dslr, always seemed like a hassle. But I am immensely enjoying it with 5dIV. Like the OP, I am primarily interested in family videos (including newborns). The important consideration for me is usability, stability, enjoying the process and spend minimal time editing.

After trial and error, I now shoot almost exclusively in 4k 30p in manual mode with shutter 1/60 and auto ISO; the aperture is selected to taste - I prefer fast lenses wide open. AF - tracking with Face Detect and touch override (it is SUPERB). After trial and errors and trying various picture profiles, I realized that I really prefer Canon standard profile as it gives the most natural yet pleasing look to my eyes. However, I now turn down sharpness all the way down, contrast half way down and saturation +1 (I like it a litte more colorful). All I do is add USM at 100 (good light) or 50 (low light) in Adobe premiere.

I am using 50L and 24-70ii. Both are excellent with DPAF. With 50L, I can sometimes get away handholding for short steady clips. I use 3-stop ND filter in daylight to keep the f number down (love the shallow DoF cinematic look).

I use Rode Video mic pro and it does not record AF motor sound. However, I also like using a lav mic (only $20) and record to iPhone with Voice Record app. Syncing is automated in Adobe Premiere - only takes seconds.

I recently acquired an LED on-camera panel. I settled on Aputure 198 as it allows to mount the mic on top and has color temperature dial which I find incredibly useful for best out of camera color. I use the panel around the house, it helps to lift shadows off faces.

I have video monopod which I highly recommend (Siru 204) - it has large trileg base that makes this monopod freestanding (on flat surface). Manfrotto videoheads (I use XPRO two way - it's been great).




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RDKirk
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Post has been last edited 4 months ago by RDKirk. 2 edits done in total.
Jul 18, 2017 09:54 |  #18

shadowdancer wrote in post #18161763 (external link)
I would like to do some family and family event videos. Because I have never shot video, I have no basis for differentiating between the video products available. For example, I know that an external mike is necessary (particularly given the poor sound filtration on the internal mike of the 5D4) and Rode mikes seem to be highly recommended. But I don't know which Rode mike I should get, or even how I could tell if it would work with a 5D4. That's why I put 5D4 in the header. I was hoping there was some-one already knowledgeable about both videography and this particular camera that could give me a few pointers. The other concern I have is that there is quite a price range in products. There is no point in buying cheaply and then the product doesn't work to a sufficient standard, or is too difficult to operate by a beginner. Equally, for the purpose for which I want to use the video facilities, I don't want to spend a lot of money if the high end product isn't really required for the intended use. Thanks for taking the time to comment!

I've been moving into video over the last four years now.

I'd first say don't go overboard in equipment if you want to do family and family event videos. Remember, this and never forget it: You are not producing "Avatar." You have no intention of producing "Avatar." It's not going to a big movie theater screen, it's not going to be heard through a professional theater sound system. Most of the advice you get is for people who want to shoot "Avatar." That's not for you.

The first thing a still photographer has to grasp moving to video is the importance of audio quality. Good audio (that is, inoffensive audio--you're not shooting "Avatar," remember) is more important than good video. People will tolerate dark, fuzzy images better than they will tolerate bad audio.

But getting inoffensive audio for family events (remember: You're not shooting "Avatar") doesn't take much. As a matter of tutelage, go to YouTube and subscribe to the Curtis Judd channel. Curtis does absolutely excellent videos to start you smart with audio. He's clear, he's direct (he doesn't meander like so many other YouTubers), he tells you exactly what you need to know at your level.

It takes getting the microphone as close to the subject as possible. TANSTAATM: There Ain't No Such Thing As A Telephoto Microphone. So if possible, you'd want to get a lavaliere microphone on the subject. It doesn't have to be a very expensive one, but you'll probably find the cheaper wireless models are most practical for family events. Just remember you'll need a whole separate set for each person you want miked.

More often, though, for family events you'll be using a camera-mounted shotgun microphone and living with its limitations. You won't find any difference in sound quality for family events between a Rode VideoPro and a Rode VideoGo, but the VideoGo costs less than half as much and you'll never come back with nothing because you forgot to turn it on or the separate battery went dead.

If you were doing something more than family events, you might want to do the separate recorder route...but you're doing family events, so just route the microphone into the camera.

Camera support? Do you set up a tripod now for family events? Why not? The same issues apply. For family events, think "monopod" and IS lenses.

You. Are. Not. Shooting. "Avatar."




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artsf
Member
Joined Sep 2015
Jul 18, 2017 12:52 |  #19

I'd say a shotgun mic with 20db boost is pretty much a must for Canon dslr due to its weak pre-amp. Using Rode go mic will require significant gain that will result in hissing noise. There is Rode VideoMic pro and also cheaper Azden SMX-15 which I haven't tried.

RDKirk wrote in post #18404841 (external link)

shadowdancer wrote in post #18161763 (external link)
I would like to do some family and family event videos. Because I have never shot video, I have no basis for differentiating between the video products available. For example, I know that an external mike is necessary (particularly given the poor sound filtration on the internal mike of the 5D4) and Rode mikes seem to be highly recommended. But I don't know which Rode mike I should get, or even how I could tell if it would work with a 5D4. That's why I put 5D4 in the header. I was hoping there was some-one already knowledgeable about both videography and this particular camera that could give me a few pointers. The other concern I have is that there is quite a price range in products. There is no point in buying cheaply and then the product doesn't work to a sufficient standard, or is too difficult to operate by a beginner. Equally, for the purpose for which I want to use the video facilities, I don't want to spend a lot of money if the high end product isn't really required for the intended use. Thanks for taking the time to comment!

I've been moving into video over the last four years now.

I'd first say don't go overboard in equipment if you want to do family and family event videos. Remember, this and never forget it: You are not producing "Avatar." You have no intention of producing "Avatar." It's not going to a big movie theater screen, it's not going to be heard through a professional theater sound system. Most of the advice you get is for people who want to shoot "Avatar." That's not for you.

The first thing a still photographer has to grasp moving to video is the importance of audio quality. Good audio (that is, inoffensive audio--you're not shooting "Avatar," remember) is more important than good video. People will tolerate dark, fuzzy images better than they will tolerate bad audio.

But getting inoffensive audio for family events (remember: You're not shooting "Avatar") doesn't take much. As a matter of tutelage, go to YouTube and subscribe to the Curtis Judd channel. Curtis does absolutely excellent videos to start you smart with audio. He's clear, he's direct (he doesn't meander like so many other YouTubers), he tells you exactly what you need to know at your level.

It takes getting the microphone as close to the subject as possible. TANSTAATM: There Ain't No Such Thing As A Telephoto Microphone. So if possible, you'd want to get a lavaliere microphone on the subject. It doesn't have to be a very expensive one, but you'll probably find the cheaper wireless models are most practical for family events. Just remember you'll need a whole separate set for each person you want miked.

More often, though, for family events you'll be using a camera-mounted shotgun microphone and living with its limitations. You won't find any difference in sound quality for family events between a Rode VideoPro and a Rode VideoGo, but the VideoGo costs less than half as much and you'll never come back with nothing because you forgot to turn it on or the separate battery went dead.

If you were doing something more than family events, you might want to do the separate recorder route...but you're doing family events, so just route the microphone into the camera.

Camera support? Do you set up a tripod now for family events? Why not? The same issues apply. For family events, think "monopod" and IS lenses.

You. Are. Not. Shooting. "Avatar."




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RDKirk
Adorama says I'm "packed."
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Jul 18, 2017 14:12 |  #20

artsf wrote in post #18405032 (external link)
I'd say a shotgun mic with 20db boost is pretty much a must for Canon dslr due to its weak pre-amp. Using Rode go mic will require significant gain that will result in hissing noise. There is Rode VideoMic pro and also cheaper Azden SMX-15 which I haven't tried.

This is only for family event videos, not for professional work.

For my work, I always use separate recorders with mics on or near the speakers, but I'll also have my cameras equipped with Rode VideoGo microphones simply to capture sync tracks to the cameras. To be honest, gain hiss simply isn't a problem (they of course do still have the same problems inherent in any shotgun microphone: There Ain't No Such Thing As A Telephoto Microphone) if you're only going to listen to family events on family playback devices.




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artsf
Member
Joined Sep 2015
Post has been last edited 4 months ago by artsf. 2 edits done in total.
Jul 18, 2017 14:25 as a reply to RDKirk's post |  #21

I tried Rode mic go and it was too quiet even for family events. Also I think it will pick up AF motor noise (DPAF). Separate recording is a good budget option, lav mic ($20) and smartphone - my iphone 6 has excellent sound recording with voice recording app - no need for zoom, etc. However, seaparate recording is only practical for long-take shots with one-two persons. It's pain for family videos when each clip is less than 5 mins long and then syncing and file managment becomes a hassle. I only use it for loger videos.




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bumpintheroad
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Joined Oct 2013
NJ, USA
Jul 21, 2017 03:16 |  #22

For under $30 on Amazon, the Takstar SGC-598 shotgun mic is big improvement over the camera built-in mic. It isn't as good as a Rode Videomic Pro but I think it's better than the Videomicro or Video Go. A lavaliere mic on your subject is going to provide the best audio quality, particularly as you increase the camera to subject distance, but is also the most difficult to use, particularly when you have more than one subject to mic.

I put together a quick video showing the difference in audio quality between the built-in mic, Takstar SGC-598 and an Azden Pro-XD wireless lav mic. All mics were plugged directly into a Canon 80D and I was about three feet from the camera. No audio processing was done other than to equalize the levels between clips.

https://www.youtube.co​m/watch?v=ucYzI9lf4SE (external link)


-- Mark | Gear | Flickrexternal link | Picasaexternal link | Youtubeexternal link | Facebookexternal link | Image editing is okay

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Spacemunkie
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Joined Apr 2008
Aug 14, 2017 22:47 |  #23

Old thread but...

+1 for the Takstar. 25 bucks and it's as good as an original Rode Videomic. Also a fan of the rode Videomicro. Excellent value for money - just stay close to your subject. I use it on a DJI Osmo for handheld recordings at events and ad hoc interviews. Superb. Not so enamoured by more expensive Rode mics though. The NTG2 and NTG3 aren't up to the regular use they should be able to withstand for what they cost. Would take a Sennheiser ME66 in preference every time.

The clip above demonstrates more than anything just how horrid audio recorded straight into a Canon DSLR is though. Ramp the gain DOWN when recording: on the mic, in the camera (if possible) or both. Anything to get that noise floor reduced. Bringing the level up in post will give you cleaner audio. Better still, forget plugging a mic into your camera and use a recorder. Zoom H1 and Tascam DR40 are both superb.


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Equipment needed to take good quality video on canon 5div
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