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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Fashion, Editorial & Commercial
Thread started 15 Jan 2017 (Sunday) 20:11
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trailblazer
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Post has been edited 11 months ago by trailblazer.
Jan 15, 2017 20:11 |  #1

I am not really a poster of images, but I thought I had to share this story.

Someone asked me to take a corporate headshot of them and said that I had to do it on-site at their small office since they were busy, which was fine. This told me I needed to use my speedlight kit instead of strobes.

I got there on the day about half in hour in advance to set up at the small office. I was told I had to use a conference room so as to not be too distracting to the other employees. The conference room was about 10' x 16', but had a long, heavy conference table in the middle and chairs around it, a large TV and some other video conferencing equipment. There were two doors, one on each of the shorter 10' width sides.

I locked one of the doors with the push knob for safety to prevent persons from walking into the setup, and popped open my reversible Impact black/white foldable backdrop on the black side and used the case it came with to place on the conference table so that I could put my lightstand on it and not scuff the table. This was my main light and I used a 60" white umbrella in reflective mode high up touching the roof (which was 10' high) and pointing down at about 45 degrees. This light was about 5' from the subject.

My second light was another speedlight with a grid on it in the back left corner of the room behind where I would place my subject. I had to get the stand to fit as tightly as I could in the corner so I used a reversible stand that had a very small footprint. This light was 6' from the subject.

I planned to use the cream conference table as a reflector and used my light meter to test the lights. The back light was set on 1/32 power and the main light was 1/8 power.

When I was done, I called in the client in and he stood where I placed him. He seemed pretty stoic and I had some brief small talk to put him at ease and while talking to him, I guided him into a basic pose, managed to squeeze a smile out of him and fired two frames and showed him to see if he was ok with it. He took one look, said he was good, then unlocked the door behind him, walked out and was gone.

If it wasn't for proper planning and testing the lights beforehand; if I waited to take a photo, then check the screen, make adjustments and then keep doing that like most persons would have done, I would have been in big trouble. Here is the image, almost straight out of camera, along with a diagram I did in MS paint as the lighting set up.

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dmward
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Jan 16, 2017 18:53 |  #2

I can see why he liked it and left. No need for more, when you have a keeper.

I also appreciate the back story. Reinforces the importance of planning, being flexible and getting the job done.

I had a similar situation a long time ago. Little different,
It was the CEO of a major manufacturer, setup by the PR department. We were given access to his office to setup. One photographer shooting with strobes and medium format. (Hasselblad with color, and B&W film in separate backs.) Other photographer with ambient light and some constant light help with 35mm cameras, one with transparency and the other with B&W.

We were told we had 10 minutes with the CEO arrived. So when he walked into the office we got him positioned and started shooting. After 10 minutes my partner and I stopped. The CEO looked at us and asked what next. We said "we were told you only had 10 minutes". He smiled and said, "take the time you need I don't want to have to do this again for a year." We shot while talking to him for another 15 minutes.

That was back in the film era so it was a few days before proofs were ready. The PR guy came to pick them up and we asked if he wanted to go through them now at the studio. His reply was "No, Mrs CEO does the selections."

Digital and chimping is so much better. :-D


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Alveric
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Post has been edited 11 months ago by Alveric.
Jan 17, 2017 09:05 |  #3

dmward wrote in post #18246516 (external link)
[..]
Digital and chimping is so much better. :-D

Just make sure Mrs CEO is in the room as well. :)


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ksbal
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Post has been last edited 11 months ago by ksbal. 2 edits done in total.
Jan 17, 2017 09:13 |  #4

I use the office help for test subjects, and I'm all set when they are ready to walk in.

Last one, I had to move all the furniture as I had to have them sitting for the picture, due to low ceiling and the projector hanging down in the way. Not happy with the catch lights, but umbrellas were up as high as they could go and the subject was seated.

Conference rooms are a blessing and a curse that way.

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mdvaden
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Jan 20, 2017 23:05 |  #5

dmward wrote in post #18246516 (external link)
I can see why he liked it and left. No need for more, when you have a keeper.

I also appreciate the back story. Reinforces the importance of planning, being flexible and getting the job done.

Personally, I'd never have shown him that one until taking maybe 20 more. Maybe he liked it or thought it was okay, but I suspect he would have liked one of another 25 even better, and it would only have taken 10 minutes max.

It's possible it reflects his personality. But with no background or knowledge about him in advance, the glance appears as if he was cutting onions and fighting back tears.

Unless that's the most he opens his eyes.


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mdvaden
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Jan 20, 2017 23:07 |  #6

ksbal wrote in post #18247101 (external link)
I use the office help for test subjects, and I'm all set when they are ready to walk in.

Last one, I had to move all the furniture as I had to have them sitting for the picture, due to low ceiling and the projector hanging down in the way. Not happy with the catch lights, but umbrellas were up as high as they could go and the subject was seated.

Conference rooms are a blessing and a curse that way.
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forum: Fashion, Editorial & Commercial

When people wear glasses, do you shoot with them on always, or half / half?


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ksbal
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Jan 21, 2017 17:05 as a reply to mdvaden's post |  #7

Depends on what happens when I take the shot and check... if it looks good, like it does here, I leave it.
If it doesn't, then I try to adjust them, so the reflection is minimized. and sometimes we give up and take them of.


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trailblazer
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Jan 23, 2017 13:24 |  #8

Thanks for everyone's input.

Yes, the client's eyes were naturally small, which was further exacerbated by the fact that he smiled. The purpose of the shot was to appear friendly and approachable and it actually took some coaching to get him to smile as his natural expression is quite stoic.




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dmward
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Jan 30, 2017 08:09 |  #9

mdvaden wrote in post #18250972 (external link)
Personally, I'd never have shown him that one until taking maybe 20 more. Maybe he liked it or thought it was okay, but I suspect he would have liked one of another 25 even better, and it would only have taken 10 minutes max.

It's possible it reflects his personality. But with no background or knowledge about him in advance, the glance appears as if he was cutting onions and fighting back tears.

Unless that's the most he opens his eyes.

I rarely show a subject the back of the camera. If they ask I will but try to make it later in the session if possible.
When I get them ready, I try to get 5 - 10 images on the card quickly getting them to respond to me as naturally as possible. Generally, people get stiffer and stiffer as time goes on in the session.


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dmward
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Jan 30, 2017 08:09 |  #10

Alveric wrote in post #18247092 (external link)
Just make sure Mrs CEO is in the room as well. :)

That helps. :-D


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dmward
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Jan 30, 2017 08:11 |  #11

mdvaden wrote in post #18250974 (external link)
When people wear glasses, do you shoot with them on always, or half / half?

I ask them if they always wear the specks. If so, then leave them on. Otherwise some without. If there are reflections in the glasses I use the age old tilt time down by raising the bow above the ear.


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trailblazer
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Jan 30, 2017 09:48 |  #12

dmward wrote in post #18259467 (external link)
If there are reflections in the glasses I use the age old tilt time down by raising the bow above the ear.

This is what I do




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