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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Underwater Photography
Thread started 22 Jan 2017 (Sunday) 07:23
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Pink Salmon taking deep breath

 
WildImages
Senior Member
Joined Jul 2009
Jan 22, 2017 07:23 |  #1

This Pink or Humpback Salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) takes a deep breath so as to increase its oxygen intake as it journeys up his natal stream during the spawning run. These "Humpies" return from the sea every 3-4 years, initially guided by the earth's lines of magnetic force, then smell, to find their waters of birth. This information gathered from research and discussions with marine biologists. Hopefully I have not lead you astray.

This image was taken in Walker Cove Creek in Misty Fjord National Monument of Southeast Alaska. The camera data in the EXIF file is not accurate as selections for my Nikon AW1 with 11.5-27mm f3.5 lens are not available.


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One thing I would like to mention is the dangers imposed by bears. Both Brown and Black Bears are in the area and are attracted to spawning streams. I had a "lookout" while I photographed who was alert for danger. No doubt about it, we were trespassers as the bears owned any part of this stream they wanted!



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dm1215al
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Joined Nov 2016
Riverview, FL USA
Jan 22, 2017 14:11 |  #2

Nice photo and good idea for the lookout.




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fish_shooter
Member
Joined May 2010
Alaska
Jan 22, 2017 18:48 |  #3

Gaping is actually a display of aggression. Here by a male. It can lead to one male biting another. Males also gape next to females to encourage then to spawn at late courtship stages. Both sexes gape when they spawn. Females may gape when they probe their nests during construction as well as for aggression. I have shots showing all these behaviors. Context is important for figuring things out - i.e., shots taken before and after the gape shot.


http://www.salmonograp​hy.com/external link

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WildImages
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
Joined Jul 2009
Jan 23, 2017 07:08 as a reply to fish_shooter's post |  #4

Ok, thanks. I kept running into information that indicated a lack of oxygen caused them to take a massive gulp of water to gather or derive more oxygen. I will point my research toward "salmon gape" and see what I come up with. This is all new to me as you can probably tell so I am learning. Soaking up everything like a sponge!




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fish_shooter
Member
Joined May 2010
Alaska
Jan 23, 2017 20:53 as a reply to WildImages's post |  #5

I have seen females do a gulp like breathing - the mouth only opens part way and the gill cover flexes out. Digging the redd is a workout. As well I have seen Dolly Varden slow down after a while during their undulations (waving body over redd) after spawning - Nick Karas describes the same or similar undulation behavior for Brook Trout so you may have seen it.


http://www.salmonograp​hy.com/external link

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WildImages
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Senior Member
Joined Jul 2009
Jan 24, 2017 05:08 as a reply to fish_shooter's post |  #6

I have seen the Brookie dig a redd but I am under the impression she drops her roe, then moves off a bit to guard the eggs while males fight to drop milt. Maybe this is not correct as well. I am going to start a new thread showing the female digging.

I am also going to look up Nick Karas and try to educate myself. Thanks for the tip.




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fish_shooter
Member
Joined May 2010
Alaska
Post has been edited 8 months ago by fish_shooter.
Jan 24, 2017 14:57 |  #7

WildImages wrote in post #18253997 (external link)
I have seen the Brookie dig a redd but I am under the impression she drops her roe, then moves off a bit to guard the eggs while males fight to drop milt. Maybe this is not correct as well. I am going to start a new thread showing the female digging.

I am also going to look up Nick Karas and try to educate myself. Thanks for the tip.


The various charr species may do things differently. Dolly Varden males release their sperm alongside the female releasing her eggs just like salmon - I have a number of shots of this in my spawning act gallery. Dollies are intermingled with the salmon as the images are shown in reverse chronological order. More than one male Dolly may be involved as well! http://www.salmonograp​hy.com/Salmonid-Topic/Spawning-Act/ (external link)

The actual spawning takes place in just seconds compared to hours of digging preparing the redd.


http://www.salmonograp​hy.com/external link

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Pink Salmon taking deep breath
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