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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre People Talk
Thread started 01 May 2017 (Monday) 15:47
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How to you deal with reflections in glasses?

 
sosaysmorvant
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May 01, 2017 15:47 |  #1

I'm a newbie & did a few seniors this year for friends. One of them had glasses and I was not happy with the reflections in a lot of pictures.....especiall​y if I used a fill flash. Any advice would be appreciated.




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joedlh
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May 01, 2017 15:52 |  #2

I ask them to remove the glasses. An alternative is to acquire glassless frames if the subject feels uncomfortable without them. Sometime you can work the scene to minimize reflections. But that's hard with a flash.


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nathancarter
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May 01, 2017 16:00 |  #3

Adjust lighting, camera angle, and pose to minimize the reflection of the light source in the glasses.

Depending on the nature of the image, it's very rare that I try to correct it much in post.


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Scrumhalf
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May 01, 2017 16:06 |  #4

Get the flash off axis, and have the glasses wearers turn a little away from the flash side. The combination will ensure that any reflection isn't captured by the lens.


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Pigpen101
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May 01, 2017 16:16 |  #5

No sure about this but a circular polarizer helps negate reflections in windows??? Never tried it w/ flash though.




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DarenM
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Theresa, NY
May 01, 2017 18:56 |  #6

if you slightly tip the glasses down, this often works for me


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ManiZ
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May 01, 2017 19:21 |  #7

Scrumhalf wrote in post #18343781 (external link)
Get the flash off axis, and have the glasses wearers turn a little away from the flash side. The combination will ensure that any reflection isn't captured by the lens.

+1. This gets it done every time.

Think of a camera-mounted speedlite being bounced off a wall to your 7 o' clock position. If you subject is facing you with their head turned slightly to their left, there would be no place for a reflection to show up in their glasses. They might getting a slight haze in their lenses, but not a true reflection.

This only becomes problematic with extremely thick lenses some people have to wear, where light refraction shows glass 'layers' unless you are 100% perpendicular to them. I have not had to photograph anyone like that yet, but I would imagine getting the flash off the camera would be the only option.


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aezoss
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Joined Nov 2013
May 02, 2017 00:44 |  #8

I found this Joe Edelman video helpful.

https://www.youtube.co​m/watch?v=AeVbJepHXlk (external link)

Lee




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Archibald
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May 02, 2017 00:50 |  #9

Some folks have the subject lift the temples a bit above the ears. Dunno, maybe that's what DarenM meant.


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sosaysmorvant
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South Louisiana
May 02, 2017 08:23 |  #10

Thanks for the tips. That video really helped.




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CameraMan
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Oct 07, 2017 20:48 |  #11

The tipping the glasses forward by lifting the earpiece off the ear slightly works well and looks natural. They just need to lift the earpieces maybe 1/8 - 1/4 inch.


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Archibald
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Oct 07, 2017 21:07 |  #12

CameraMan wrote in post #18468128 (external link)
The tipping the glasses forward by lifting the earpiece off the ear slightly works well and looks natural. They just need to lift the earpieces maybe 1/8 - 1/4 inch.

Earpiece = Temple.


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Picture editing OK

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jra
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Oct 08, 2017 10:45 |  #13

I always watch for reflections when people are wearing glasses and try to work the light angles to minimize them. If they are unavoidable for a particular shot, I'll take the photo with the glasses, reflections and all, and then have them remove their glasses and take the same photo again. I then use the non-glasses photo to edit out the reflections in PS. Just layer it on top of the original photo, match up the eyes and mask it so that the reflections can't be seen. It only takes a few minutes and is extremely effective.


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How to you deal with reflections in glasses?
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