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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Fashion, Editorial & Commercial Talk
Thread started 23 Jun 2017 (Friday) 22:27
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Model in front of stained glass window

 
KatManDEW
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Joined Jan 2005
Ohio
Jun 23, 2017 22:27 |  #1

I'm going to be shooting a fabulous model in front of a backlit stained glass window. Any suggestion on lighting. Expose for the window and fill with a softbox? What size and shape softbox?




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nathancarter
Cream of the Crop
Joined Dec 2010
Jun 26, 2017 11:36 |  #2

KatManDEW wrote in post #18385614 (external link)
I'm going to be shooting a fabulous model in front of a backlit stained glass window. Any suggestion on lighting. Expose for the window and fill with a softbox? What size and shape softbox?

Yes, expose for the window with camera settings, and expose for the model with flash.

As far as size and shape, that entirely depends on the style/look you're going for.
Is it a soft boudoir-style look? Use the biggest softbox you can get your hands on.
Is it an edgy punk look? A small modifier, or even a hard source like a dish reflector, might get you an interesting look.

Side note that you didn't ask for: If this is in a church or historic building, be mindful of the floors. Wrap the feet of your lightstands with a heavy cloth or felt, or cut slots in tennis balls and use those as bumpers on the feet of your stands.


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KatManDEW
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
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Joined Jan 2005
Ohio
Jun 26, 2017 14:23 |  #3

nathancarter wrote in post #18387346 (external link)
Yes, expose for the window with camera settings, and expose for the model with flash.

As far as size and shape, that entirely depends on the style/look you're going for.
Is it a soft boudoir-style look? Use the biggest softbox you can get your hands on.
Is it an edgy punk look? A small modifier, or even a hard source like a dish reflector, might get you an interesting look.

Side note that you didn't ask for: If this is in a church or historic building, be mindful of the floors. Wrap the feet of your lightstands with a heavy cloth or felt, or cut slots in tennis balls and use those as bumpers on the feet of your stands.

Thank you so very much. I'm after a soft look, but I was worried about flash spill over onto the background (the stained glass window).

Thanks again!




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nathancarter
Cream of the Crop
Joined Dec 2010
Jun 27, 2017 08:13 |  #4

KatManDEW wrote in post #18387472 (external link)
Thank you so very much. I'm after a soft look, but I was worried about flash spill over onto the background (the stained glass window).

Thanks again!

Two things, then - both equally important.
1. Put some distance between the model and the window. Don't have her back up against the glass like a mugshot. The ratio of distance from background, to model, to light source, will determine how much the flash affects the model compared to how much the flash affects the background.

2. Glass is reflective. The frame and wall may also be reflective (shiny metal or polished wood). The light source might reflect from the glass/wall back to the camera.
To solve this, consider and adjust the positioning of the light and the camera, relative to the wall. If you're shooting square-on to the glass (camera lens perpendicular to glass), you'll have to have the light off to one side, or far above, so that the reflection in the glass is not seen by the camera.


http://www.avidchick.c​om (external link) for business stuff
http://www.facebook.co​m/VictorVoyeur (external link) for fun stuff

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KatManDEW
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Joined Jan 2005
Ohio
Jun 28, 2017 09:54 |  #5

nathancarter wrote in post #18388025 (external link)
Two things, then - both equally important.
1. Put some distance between the model and the window. Don't have her back up against the glass like a mugshot. The ratio of distance from background, to model, to light source, will determine how much the flash affects the model compared to how much the flash affects the background.

2. Glass is reflective. The frame and wall may also be reflective (shiny metal or polished wood). The light source might reflect from the glass/wall back to the camera.
To solve this, consider and adjust the positioning of the light and the camera, relative to the wall. If you're shooting square-on to the glass (camera lens perpendicular to glass), you'll have to have the light off to one side, or far above, so that the reflection in the glass is not seen by the camera.

That all makes sense. Thank you so very much! I will post a photo from there to show you what I came up with.

Thanks again!




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Model in front of stained glass window
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