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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Wildlife Talk
Thread started 27 Jul 2017 (Thursday) 03:10
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bidkev
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Post has been edited 3 months ago by bidkev.
Jul 27, 2017 03:10 |  #1

I have a bad back and I'm getting a bit too old to be crawling around under a camo net and it's too hot here to wear a ghillie suit in summer. Blinds/hides are ridiculously expensive here at around $400 but I can buy one of these for $50. The thought is to cut a small window in each side covered with a bit of camo or scrim netting which will allow me to observe and through which a can poke my lens. It's 2.10 metres tall and 1.20 metres square so it will allow me to stand or sit on a lightweight folding seat. Any observations welcomed. I would also break up it's outline with pieces of scrim/camo net. It's very light with no frame as such being a "pop up" and folds flat

IMAGE: https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4292/35358381434_da8ef0b6f1.jpg
[IMAGE'S LINK: https://flic.kr/p/VSuW​W7] (external link)s-l500 (external link) by Kevin Dickinson (external link), on Flickr

See my fish and fishy photography tips here: https://kevindickinson​fineartphot.smugmug.co​m/Tropical-Fish-2/ (external link)
Canon 7D mk2 | Canon 6D, 100-400L mk2, Canon 24-105L, Canon 100 Macro | 24 EF-S 2.8 STM |Canon 1.4 Ex Mklll | Canon 580EXll| Kenko 12,20,36 Ext tubes |

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nardes
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Post has been last edited 3 months ago by nardes. 2 edits done in total.
Jul 27, 2017 04:27 |  #2

Hi Kevin

I have seen these used by amateur astronomers at dark sky astro-camps. They basically sit inside at a small table on a small stool controlling their telescope and taking images via their laptop fitted with a red filter to dim the screen brightness.

Occasionally a new adopter forgets to peg the shelter down and omits to fasten the stabilising guy ropes, so the tent sways and flattens in strong winds - that would be my main concern.

A comical sight at the end of these camps is watching the users trying to collapse, fold and fit the darned thing back into its zipped bag.:-)

Cheers

Dennis




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bidkev
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Post has been edited 3 months ago by bidkev.
Jul 27, 2017 05:00 |  #3

nardes wrote in post #18412331 (external link)
Hi Kevin

I have seen these used by amateur astronomers at dark sky astro-camps. They basically sit inside at a small table on a small stool controlling their telescope and taking images via their laptop fitted with a red filter to dim the screen brightness.

Occasionally a new adopter forgets to peg the shelter down and omits to fasten the stabilising guy ropes, so the tent sways and flattens in strong winds - that would be my main concern.

A comical sight at the end of these camps is watching the users trying to collapse, fold and fit the darned thing back into its zipped bag.:-)

Cheers

Dennis

Thanks Denis. I'd be using it mainly in the rainforest at first light so wind wouldn't be a problem. Yes, I gather that collapsing it would take some practice as I used to struggle with a large reflector that I had :oops:


See my fish and fishy photography tips here: https://kevindickinson​fineartphot.smugmug.co​m/Tropical-Fish-2/ (external link)
Canon 7D mk2 | Canon 6D, 100-400L mk2, Canon 24-105L, Canon 100 Macro | 24 EF-S 2.8 STM |Canon 1.4 Ex Mklll | Canon 580EXll| Kenko 12,20,36 Ext tubes |

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nardes
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Joined Jun 2009
Australia
Jul 27, 2017 05:11 as a reply to bidkev's post |  #4

Hi Kevin

We have a couple of Helinox camp chairs that are lightweight, strong and have a small form factor for carrying.

Have a look here:

http://www.helinox.com​.au/lightweight-camping-chairs (external link)

They are not cheap, but so far have proved very durable, functional and reliable.

I have found these easier to carry that a traditional, lightweight folding chair.

Cheers

Dennis




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MatthewK
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Maryland
Jul 27, 2017 19:32 |  #5

Kev,

I have a similar shelter, and have used it to good effect. It lets you move around without being seen by your subjects, so you can relax when need be. Might be a little hot in the summer, so I'd set up in shade whenever possible.


flickrexternal link

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bidkev
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Jul 27, 2017 20:19 |  #6

MatthewK wrote in post #18412860 (external link)
Kev,

I have a similar shelter, and have used it to good effect. It lets you move around without being seen by your subjects, so you can relax when need be. Might be a little hot in the summer, so I'd set up in shade whenever possible.

Thanks Mathew. I thought about cutting the floor out so that I could move around. Is this what you did?


See my fish and fishy photography tips here: https://kevindickinson​fineartphot.smugmug.co​m/Tropical-Fish-2/ (external link)
Canon 7D mk2 | Canon 6D, 100-400L mk2, Canon 24-105L, Canon 100 Macro | 24 EF-S 2.8 STM |Canon 1.4 Ex Mklll | Canon 580EXll| Kenko 12,20,36 Ext tubes |

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MatthewK
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Jul 27, 2017 22:01 as a reply to bidkev's post |  #7

The model I have doesn't have a floor. Id definitely remove the floor though, you'd get some better air flow.


flickrexternal link

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Pondrader
"now I'm no rocket scientist but I do get a shot or two"
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Minden, Ontario, Canada
Jul 27, 2017 22:06 |  #8

I have one call The dog house from Cabelas. Kevin ... very simular works great when i need.


Jeff ........7D Mark II, 7D, 70-300L, 100-400LII
flickr (external link)

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Choderboy
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Jul 28, 2017 02:03 |  #9

I have considered something similar but I have doubts. The main problem I believe is positioning. I find it's very common to have a subject at a reasonable distance but obscured by trees / foliage.
The challenge is moving quietly and or slowly, depending on the subject, into a position with a clear view without spooking the subject. A hide like this would make that much more difficult.
I have also found that many subjects will arrive and go about their business if I am waiting, fairly still and quietly, without the need for a hide.
Example: this Eastern spinebill would not let me get close enough for a decent shot. I noticed it would arrive around 4:30pm each day. So I arrived at 4:15pm, set up and waited.
It was quite tolerant of both myself and the camera moving about in contrast to very easily spooked as I had tried to approach the day before.

IMAGE: https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8644/28476794546_4a2107f42d_o.jpg

This Rose robin was a similar case, I was setup hoping for a Spinebill when it came very close to me and perched long enough for a couple of shots.

IMAGE: https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4215/35208766502_2091c2ee6f_o.jpg

About a week later I had a Rose robin perched so close to me that I could not take a photo (with the 100-400 II!)

I have had some great bird experiences without photos. I just find a nice spot, sit in a comfortable chair and let them come. I had Golden Whistlers, Eastern spinebills and Yellow-faced honey eaters all within touching distance. Three times I have had a Peregrine falcon land and perch within 5 metres of me. Now, maybe I would do better with a hide and I'm sure different species would benefit from different approaches. I suspect patience is a really good method though and that's why I am yet to try a hide.

Dave
https://www.flickr.com​/photos/12185187@N00/ (external link)
1D4, 1DS2, 7D2. Canon, Sigma lenses

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bidkev
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Jul 28, 2017 03:11 |  #10

Choderboy wrote in post #18413086 (external link)
I have considered something similar but I have doubts. The main problem I believe is positioning. I find it's very common to have a subject at a reasonable distance but obscured by trees / foliage.
The challenge is moving quietly and or slowly, depending on the subject, into a position with a clear view without spooking the subject. A hide like this would make that much more difficult.
I have also found that many subjects will arrive and go about their business if I am waiting, fairly still and quietly, without the need for a hide.
Example: this Eastern spinebill would not let me get close enough for a decent shot. I noticed it would arrive around 4:30pm each day. So I arrived at 4:15pm, set up and waited.
It was quite tolerant of both myself and the camera moving about in contrast to very easily spooked as I had tried to approach the day before.
QUOTED IMAGE

This Rose robin was a similar case, I was setup hoping for a Spinebill when it came very close to me and perched long enough for a couple of shots.
QUOTED IMAGE

About a week later I had a Rose robin perched so close to me that I could not take a photo (with the 100-400 II!)

I have had some great bird experiences without photos. I just find a nice spot, sit in a comfortable chair and let them come. I had Golden Whistlers, Eastern spinebills and Yellow-faced honey eaters all within touching distance. Three times I have had a Peregrine falcon land and perch within 5 metres of me. Now, maybe I would do better with a hide and I'm sure different species would benefit from different approaches. I suspect patience is a really good method though and that's why I am yet to try a hide.

Thanks Dave, Beautiful shots BTW


See my fish and fishy photography tips here: https://kevindickinson​fineartphot.smugmug.co​m/Tropical-Fish-2/ (external link)
Canon 7D mk2 | Canon 6D, 100-400L mk2, Canon 24-105L, Canon 100 Macro | 24 EF-S 2.8 STM |Canon 1.4 Ex Mklll | Canon 580EXll| Kenko 12,20,36 Ext tubes |

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Tom ­ Reichner
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Joined Dec 2008
Omak, in north-central Washington state, USA
Jul 29, 2017 03:46 |  #11

bidkev wrote in post #18412315 (external link)
Blinds/hides are ridiculously expensive here at around $400 but I can buy one of these for $50. The thought is to cut a small window in each side covered with a bit of camo or scrim netting which will allow me to observe and through which a can poke my lens.
QUOTED IMAGE
[IMAGE'S LINK: https://flic.kr/p/VSuW​W7] (external link)s-l500 (external link) by Kevin Dickinson (external link), on Flickr

I have used these same types of super-inexpensive blinds (a.k.a. "hides") for many years, with a lot of success. . I use the ones that aren't so upright (tall) as the one you show, but that are shorter and have a lager footprint. . They are almost always right around $50, and do not typically have any kind of a floor.

The first thing I do is to cut numerous holes in them, so that I can stick my lenses out just about anywhere. . They are so cheap that you really have nothing to lose by punching a bunch of holes in the material. . I just carry a package of safety pins with me so that I can pin shut the holes that I am not using at any given time. . The safety pins also work great for attaching bits of camo material, that will drape over the lens when you put it through a hole, and keep you concealed. . Just buy a yard or two of cheap camo material at WalMart and cut it into bandana-sized pieces for such usage. . There's always some sort of suitable camo material for 3 or 4 dollars a yard - often times even cheaper.

I would not expect this type of blind to have a floor, unless the advertisement clearly said that a floor is included. . Floors are actually a huge pain in the butt, and I would not want such a blind if it had a floor. . Why? . Because I normally set these up on ground that is very uneven and has small shrubby vegetation growing on it. This works fine if there is no floor, but if there is a floor, then it becomes almost impossible to set the blind over top of an area with small, stiff, brushy vegetation on it. . And you really can't afford to always put it on a nice clear patch of ground, because that nice clear area may not be in the best position for quality photographs. . After all, photo quality should always come first, and physical comfort should always be a very distant second.

In all honesty, the type of blind you use really doesn't mater very much at all. . However, the precise location at which you set the blind up at matters enormously. . A foot or two one way or the other will mean a world of difference in your results. . It really pays to spend a lot of time figuring out precisely where to position your blind, paying great attention to factors such as direction of the light source, aesthetic qualities of the background, ratio between subject-to-camera and subject-to-background distances, and how you want to incorporate supporting elements, such as foliage, into your compositions.

.

bidkev wrote in post #18412315 (external link)
It's very light with no frame as such being a "pop up" and folds flat.

nardes wrote in post #18412331 (external link)
A comical sight at the end of these camps is watching the users trying to collapse, fold and fit the darned thing back into its zipped bag.:-)

Dennis brings up a good point. It is often difficult to get these spring-steel-framed structures rolled up the way they need to be rolled up in order to get them back into the case. . I have had two of mine get to the point where, after much use over several years, they become misshapen enough that they simply won't go back into the position they need to in order to fold up properly. . At that point, there isn't much you can do other than give up on them and purchase a new unit.

Leaving them in one place, on a semi-permanent basis, doesn't work so sell, because they fade in super-strong sunlight, and they are so lightly built that they don't hold up to the harsh elements very well. . They're just not made to last through strong winds, snow, and day after day of 100 degree heat with super clear skies and scorching sunlight. . These super-inexpensive, lightly built hides really need to be packed up and stored out of the elements in order to get any kind of reasonable longevity out of them (unless you live in an area with a mild climate).

.

Choderboy wrote in post #18413086 (external link)
I have considered something similar but I have doubts. The main problem I believe is positioning. I find it's very common to have a subject at a reasonable distance but obscured by trees / foliage.
The challenge is moving quietly and or slowly, depending on the subject, into a position with a clear view without spooking the subject. A hide like this would make that much more difficult.

I think that the normal way a hide is used is to set up in a spot where that critters are known to frequent, and wait in a fixed position for them to come in............NOT to try to move around whilst within the hide. . Just the thought of someone trying to move around while in a hide is quite humorous!

.


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "peace of mind", NOT "piece of mind".

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bidkev
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Post has been edited 3 months ago by bidkev.
Jul 29, 2017 18:57 |  #12

Tom Reichner wrote in post #18413893 (external link)
I have used these same types of super-inexpensive blinds (a.k.a. "hides") for many years, with a lot of success. . I use the ones that aren't so upright (tall) as the one you show, but that are shorter and have a lager footprint. . They are almost always right around $50, and do not typically have any kind of a floor.

I would not expect this type of blind to have a floor, unless the advertisement clearly said that a floor is included. . Floors are actually a huge pain in the butt, and I would not want such a blind if it had a floor. . Why? . Because I normally set these up on ground that is very uneven and has small shrubby vegetation growing on it. This works fine if there is no floor, but if there is a floor, then it becomes almost impossible to set the blind over top of an area with small, stiff, brushy vegetation on it. .


.

Dennis brings up a good point. It is often difficult to get these spring-steel-framed structures rolled up the way they need to be rolled up in order to get them back into the case. . I have had two of mine get to the point where, after much use over several years, they become misshapen enough that they simply won't go back into the position they need to in order to fold up properly. . At that point, there isn't much you can do other than give up on them and purchase a new unit.

Leaving them in one place, on a semi-permanent basis, doesn't work so sell, because they fade in super-strong sunlight, and they are so lightly built that they don't hold up to the harsh elements very well. . They're just not made to last through strong winds, snow, and day after day of 100 degree heat with super clear skies and scorching sunlight. . These super-inexpensive, lightly built hides really need to be packed up and stored out of the elements in order to get any kind of reasonable longevity out of them (unless you live in an area with a mild climate).

.

I think that the normal way a hide is used is to set up in a spot where that critters are known to frequent, and wait in a fixed position for them to come in............NOT to try to move around whilst within the hide. . Just the thought of someone trying to move around while in a hide is quite humorous!

.

Thanks for your in depth reply Tom. It's an upright because it isn't really a blind. It's actually a camping shower/changing cubicle. I guess it has a floor so that feet are kept clean but I will be cutting that out.

I don't intend to keep it in situ in any location, except under my pergola. I currently have camo netting stretched across but unfortunately this detracts from normal garden viewing. I intend to do away with that and just have the blind in a corner to be used at first and last light when the birds visit.

I have found a kingfisher fishing roost and also a termite mound in a tree that is being used by a kingfisher but both are on the edge of a clearing so any attempt to get close enough for a decent shot means crossing open ground and they're gone, so I hope to cross the open ground, set the blind in the thickets near both roosts, and sit and wait to try and get a shot of them. More comfortable at my age and with my back than lying under some camo netting along with accompanying white ants and snakes :-)

I also use a camping area that is frequented by Pademelons at first light (actually they're just about to depart as they're nocturnal) but as soon as you step out the tent, they're gone so I hope to utilise it for getting decent shots of them.

Due to the extreme sun here we are blessed I guess, that all quality camping gear is UV stabilised to a high degree so rotting/fading should not be a problem and at $50 a shot, (less than half normal price as camo is discontinued line) even if it only lasts a couple of seasons, I guess it'll be worth it.


See my fish and fishy photography tips here: https://kevindickinson​fineartphot.smugmug.co​m/Tropical-Fish-2/ (external link)
Canon 7D mk2 | Canon 6D, 100-400L mk2, Canon 24-105L, Canon 100 Macro | 24 EF-S 2.8 STM |Canon 1.4 Ex Mklll | Canon 580EXll| Kenko 12,20,36 Ext tubes |

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