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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre People Talk 
Thread started 26 Aug 2017 (Saturday) 09:39
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Next step after a photo session (portraits)

 
kezug
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Aug 26, 2017 09:39 |  #1

I am just starting into actually being paid for portrait sessions (senior photo shoots, maternity sessions, etc...)

I realize I have a lot to learn, but I am growing and I am in a place to feel comfortable to charge at very reasonable rates. So far, I am doing family and close friends.

So, my question is this, when the session is done, what is the next best step in sorting and delivering the images? My business model/plan is to just deliver the images in highest quality and with post processing. Generally, I am thinking that the client gets have all the "keepers" but from that bunch, they select 10 to 20 images (depending on shoot) to be their favorites, that I will then do full edits.

I would rather have then tell me their favorites, then I spend the full time of post processing. I am not good enough yet and this is something I need to work on, but its a reality that I still need to spend some time in PP.

For example, I had a 2 hour session and have 286 images. My first pass is to mark keepers vs throwaways. The keepers, I then rate further for what I feel are the best. However, this is subjective as from the keepers, my clients may like others from the keepers over my "Bests". I should further add, the keepers will need post processing... it ranges as there are some that need to be saved and some the just need that punch edit most photo's need. Some need some really good touch ups, like stray hairs, cloning, etc...

So, is it acceptable that I give the client the keepers and let them choose their x number of favorites? Or should I spend the time ahead of giving any images to client and make my "bests" pop, hoping they like them too?

I am hoping I am explaining this well as I am sure everyone has been through this point in their photography life (those who started charging)...I just want to know what is good for me to do as a work flow at this point in my skills.


Camera's: 70D, G12 | Len's: 18-135mm IS STM, 55-250mm IS STM, 50mm f/1.8 II | Photos:flickr (external link)

  
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gonzogolf
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Aug 26, 2017 19:59 |  #2

Save yourself lots of hassle and do your own culling and editing first. Don't show them unedited files, don't show the raw stuff and say I will edit that if you like it. You open too many doors that way. If the client knows they exist they will want to see them edited, and probably want the files. Do the shoot pick the best few for each pose/setting/clothing change etc and provide them as your proofs (or deliverables. Take control of the process or you'll have no end of headaches from demanding clients who don't have a clue about what they are asking. You are the creative component, keep it that way.




  
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RDKirk
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Aug 28, 2017 15:12 |  #3

Adding to what gonzogolf said:

Be extremely selective in your "keepers." Personally, I generally make only about 120 exposure, on average, during a portrait session of maybe about 4 or 5 major poses. I explain to my clients that I do "sketching" and take additional shots so that I can composite the best portions later to create the best overall images--so I warn them that they're not going to see an image for every time they heard the shutter release. My download procedures also rename the files according to a date/time/sequence so that image numbers are not clearly successive.

A lot of clients have been socialized lately to expect hundreds and hundreds of images, but I make it clear that I'm doing careful artistry. As a practical matter, what gonzogolf said is precisely correct. If you show them too much, they'll suffer "analysis paralysis" and just ask for everything.

For each major pose, I may show only two or three or four of the best images from that pose. Because I don't show very many, I can afford the time to do fairly significant compositing and editing.

As you gain experience in doing this professionally, you will discover that this saves you time, which is your money that you're not otherwise paid for.




  
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saea501
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Aug 28, 2017 15:24 |  #4

gonzogolf wrote in post #18437846 (external link)
Save yourself lots of hassle and do your own culling and editing first. Don't show them unedited files, don't show the raw stuff and say I will edit that if you like it. You open too many doors that way. If the client knows they exist they will want to see them edited, and probably want the files. Do the shoot pick the best few for each pose/setting/clothing change etc and provide them as your proofs (or deliverables. Take control of the process or you'll have no end of headaches from demanding clients who don't have a clue about what they are asking. You are the creative component, keep it that way.

This is an absolutely perfect description of how your process should work. You maintain control.

Do the shoot, do your edits, there are your clients pictures.


Remember what the DorMouse said.....feed your head.
Bob
https://www.flickr.com …282@N06/with/38​203470844/ (external link)

  
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inwardphoto
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Sep 02, 2017 01:04 |  #5

Just make sure you do the culling quickly so the client isn't waiting. Procrastination is my biggest enemy.




  
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kezug
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Sep 02, 2017 07:47 |  #6

gonzogolf wrote in post #18437846 (external link)
Save yourself lots of hassle and do your own culling and editing first. Don't show them unedited files, don't show the raw stuff and say I will edit that if you like it. You open too many doors that way. If the client knows they exist they will want to see them edited, and probably want the files. Do the shoot pick the best few for each pose/setting/clothing change etc and provide them as your proofs (or deliverables. Take control of the process or you'll have no end of headaches from demanding clients who don't have a clue about what they are asking. You are the creative component, keep it that way.


Thank you! Once I read what you wrote it clicked and that is exactly what I did on my last shoot. I felt better in the process too as I was able to proceed through my workflow with less overhead!

Everyone thank you for your replies.


Camera's: 70D, G12 | Len's: 18-135mm IS STM, 55-250mm IS STM, 50mm f/1.8 II | Photos:flickr (external link)

  
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bobbyz
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Sep 04, 2017 09:48 |  #7

Just a hobbyist and I agree what has been said before. Out of those 286, I might pick 20 at most. First I wouldn't even shoot that many shots to begin with. And try to get lot of things right in the camera, it is not that hard.


5dmk3, 35L, 85L II, 300mm f2.8 IS I, 400mm f5.6
Fuji XT-1, 14mm f2.8, 23mm f1.4, 35mm f1.4, 56mm f1.2, 90mm f2, 50-140mm f2.8

  
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Next step after a photo session (portraits)
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