Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Read More.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Weddings & Other Family Events
Thread started 19 Sep 2017 (Tuesday) 14:51
Prev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as registered member)

I've been volunteered to shoot wedding

 
jimmy_beaner
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
Joined Oct 2010
Des Moines
Sep 20, 2017 13:35 |  #16

scorpio_e wrote in post #18456616 (external link)
I would upset if someone volunteered me for a wedding,. No MAD!!!! # no respect..

" Well, I've been committed to doing it so that is irrelevant at this point" Who does this? Seriously I would not be happy and would not do it.

This happens very infrequently. I'm not mad about it. I was already attending because my wife is in the bridal party and she knows me well enough to know I'd prefer taking pictures than trying to have a conversation with people I don't know.


Canon 7D
Canon 35 f/1.4 L,

LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as registered member)
jimmy_beaner
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
Joined Oct 2010
Des Moines
Sep 20, 2017 13:42 |  #17

scorpio_e wrote in post #18456628 (external link)
Wedding are a huge amount of pressure and preparation.

1. Keep it simple. Do not do OCF with pocket wizards. You do not want to risk light stands falling over and getting sued.
2. Focus on capturing the emotion
3. You do not need a battery grip
4. 24 to 70 2.8 with your 580 EX
5. 6D as a backup

I would use one camera that I know..the 7D... 580 EX II mounted on camera and the 24 to 70. A 64 gig card would be more than enough. You may go through one camera battery.. To be safe..change the camera battery right before the reception starts.

Have your wife shoot as you second shooter since she volunteered you ;) and she can organize the family formals for you and watch the bride wedding dress during formals.


Have them sign a contract too.. Even if you are doing it for free...

I can't believe you got volunteered into this...

You really should have a camera with dual card slots :)

Good luck!!!!!

I was thinking about the PocketWizards for the staged pictures between the wedding and reception. They would give me an off camera flash into an umbrella for some soft light pictures of the bride, groom, and family. No intention of using them during the wedding or reception. My worry with the 24-70 2.8 on the 7D relates to ISO but I guess the 580 EX II resolves some of that. The rental cost is similar to the 70-200. I'd be curious to hear more thoughts on the 24-70 vs 70-200. I know I want a zoom for flexibility as my 35 (as nice as it is) is not able to accomplish what a zoom might in a ceremony or reception.

I purchased the Canon battery grip with my 7D so I've actually never shot it without the double battery grip attached. I had it with my prior camera and loved it. I also love the run time I get from two batteries. My wife is in the bridal party so she'll be of limited use at times. She also would be a "green auto button" kind of shooter. She rarely touches the 7D unless I set it up so I don't think she'd be comfortable with the 6D. I am getting the 6D in a week ahead of time to come to terms with how it works and what not. If it isn't significantly better in the areas I need (I suspect it is), I have no issue just using the 7D. I know I should have dual card slots and I'm really excited to look into a full frame replacement camera someday that comes with that feature... but that might be more $$ than the wife would be ok with for this particular purpose :)

I was also a bit surprised but I do enjoy a challenge. I am hopeful the the lessons I learn here would allow me to do some paid photography on the side (it's really a hobby of mine but I like my hobbies to be able to pay for themselves). I don't think I'd do a wedding again as it's pretty high pressure compared to something like senior pictures.


Canon 7D
Canon 35 f/1.4 L,

LOG IN TO REPLY
Chet
For $20, I'll be your friend.
Chet's Avatar
41,454 posts
Gallery: 79 photos
Joined Sep 2007
Sep 20, 2017 14:05 |  #18

I was volunteered to do a wedding once. Went in and the minister came up to me and said absolutely no flash. As it was a darker church and I had an Xti with a 28-135 lens and nothing faster I took no pictures in the church at all. They would have gotten crap.

My advice, know your venue and the limitations.


Curator of the Bob's Pickle Emporium experience. -As always, One location to serve you better!
~Feel good today and donate to this great forum~ LINK
My Gear List

LOG IN TO REPLY
MBB89
Member
228 posts
Joined Jan 2015
Sep 20, 2017 14:18 |  #19

This is almost exactly how I got my start almost 4 years ago now. In retrospect, everything worked out very well and a 6D was my main camera at the time.

Good luck and keep it simple with posing. Mix posed and candid shots, simply have the couple look at you, look at each other, one at you, etc. Short bursts are your friend for candid moments-- memory is cheap, missed shots are not.

For a mostly daytime outdoor wedding your 7D will be fine. If things get dark, being able to shoot ISO 6400 is very helpful and the 6D will shine here.
Having two cameras is important for backups and lens selection. If you have no experience with off camera flash I don't think this is the best time to experiment. If you MUST do it, it's generally safe to set up two light stands on the corners of the DJ booth, get them high (12' or so), manual zoom ~28mm, and set to around 1/16-1/64 power depending on the ambient. That won't produce any award winning results but it should get the job done. In general, you want to shoot away from the DJ booth and towards the rest of the room.

I'd do a practice engagement session with the couple if possible. This is very helpful for getting used to working with them and getting to know how they are most comfortable.

Best of luck to you.




LOG IN TO REPLY
jimmy_beaner
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
Joined Oct 2010
Des Moines
Sep 20, 2017 15:11 |  #20

MBB89 wrote in post #18456662 (external link)
This is almost exactly how I got my start almost 4 years ago now. In retrospect, everything worked out very well and a 6D was my main camera at the time.

Good luck and keep it simple with posing. Mix posed and candid shots, simply have the couple look at you, look at each other, one at you, etc. Short bursts are your friend for candid moments-- memory is cheap, missed shots are not.

For a mostly daytime outdoor wedding your 7D will be fine. If things get dark, being able to shoot ISO 6400 is very helpful and the 6D will shine here.
Having two cameras is important for backups and lens selection. If you have no experience with off camera flash I don't think this is the best time to experiment. If you MUST do it, it's generally safe to set up two light stands on the corners of the DJ booth, get them high (12' or so), manual zoom ~28mm, and set to around 1/16-1/64 power depending on the ambient. That won't produce any award winning results but it should get the job done. In general, you want to shoot away from the DJ booth and towards the rest of the room.

I'd do a practice engagement session with the couple if possible. This is very helpful for getting used to working with them and getting to know how they are most comfortable.

Best of luck to you.

A practice session is a good idea. My hope is to get the PocketWizards ahead and practice, practice, practice until I feel good. If I don't get to that point, I can decide not to use them. I have a couple young children at home my wife wouldn't mind having tons of pictures of (that's where my practicing flash bouncing the last couple days has gone). I'm reasonably proficient with a camera but I have intentionally tried not using flash to help me better master manual mode. At which point, it became easier to force myself to not use it. Now that I have a reason to use it, I can practice it.

It does look like it could be a dark one... http://illinoiscitypin​ebluffumc.com/ (external link) Assuming that's the correct church (I don't live within 3 hours of her).


Canon 7D
Canon 35 f/1.4 L,

LOG IN TO REPLY
joedlh
Cream of the Crop
joedlh's Avatar
Joined Dec 2007
Long Island, NY, N. America, Sol III, Orion Spur, Milky Way, Local Group, Virgo Cluster, Laniakea.
Post has been edited 26 days ago by joedlh.
Sep 20, 2017 15:58 |  #21

I had a friend do this to me too. My first response is always, "I don't do weddings." They responded with "Please, please, please!" They had another friend taking pictures too. So it wasn't all on me. My main camera at the time was a 40D. It gave me the nudge to get a 7Dii, which did fine in the church where flash photography wasn't allowed.

I reiterate the advice to ask the official/priest/minist​er if they allow flash photography. If not, rather than not getting any shots, let the bride and groom know that they're not going to be great. Pump up the ISO and do your best at f/2.8. Noisy shots are better than none at all.


Joe
Gear: Kodak Instamatic, Polaroid Swinger. Oh you meant gear now. :rolleyes:
http://photo.joedlh.ne​texternal link
Editing ok

LOG IN TO REPLY
jimmy_beaner
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
Joined Oct 2010
Des Moines
Sep 20, 2017 16:05 |  #22

joedlh wrote in post #18456708 (external link)
I had a friend do this to me too. My first response is always, "I don't do weddings." They responded with "Please, please, please!" They had another friend taking pictures too. So it wasn't all on me. My main camera at the time was a 40D. It gave me the nudge to get a 7Dii, which did fine in the church where flash photography wasn't allowed.

I reiterate the advice to ask the official/priest/minist​er if they allow flash photography. If not, rather than not getting any shots, let the bride and groom know that they're not going to be great. Pump up the ISO and do your best at f/2.8. Noisy shots are better than none at all.

I have the bride asking about the flash. I figure, worst case... I have the 6D and the 35mm f/1.4L. That should provide enough reach to get something.


Canon 7D
Canon 35 f/1.4 L,

LOG IN TO REPLY
scorpio_e
Cream of the Crop
scorpio_e's Avatar
Joined Aug 2007
Pa
Sep 20, 2017 16:31 as a reply to jimmy_beaner's post |  #23

" I was thinking about the PocketWizards for the staged pictures between the wedding and reception. They would give me an off camera flash into an umbrella for some soft light pictures of the bride, groom, and family"

I see your point.. Just be prepared to abandon it, if things go wrong. Sometimes the church can give you nasty reflections off the church wall and the umbrella actually makes it works.


Battery grip for the 7D... Run with it if you usually do :)

Since your wife is in the bridal party, let her manage and help with the bridal formals. Trust me it will be a HUGE help for you :) My wife does it for me and it is really helpful.

I would not have her shoot, let her enjoy the day:)

Weddings are Soooooooo stressful and take up so much time *LOL* I am pricing so I book smaller weddings...one location... I have had it with full day weddings and 5 locations *LOL*.. I really enjoy the small weddings.

As far as a 2.8 lens and the 7D, you will be ok BUT the 6D would be a lot better.

I have shot weddings with the 40D and max iso was 1600 !!!!!

Good luck and you will get some great advice here.


www.steelcityphotograp​hy.com (external link)

LOG IN TO REPLY
Talley
Talley Whacker
Talley's Avatar
10,084 posts
Gallery: 35 photos
Joined Dec 2011
Houston
Sep 20, 2017 16:38 |  #24

don't do it.

I've refused three weddings so far from family. I told them I would assist them in finding someone within their budget but I've declined due to the fact it's family and I have a wife and 4 kids that I'd like to enjoy with at the wedding. Otherwise I'll be ignoring them and would be difficult for them to understand why.


5D4 |12mm 2.8 FE | 16-35L 2.8 III | Σ 35A | Σ 50A | Σ 85A | 200 F2 IS | 1.4xIII
X-T20 | X-E3 | 18/2 | 35/1.4 | 56/1.2 | 18-135
My Gear Archive

LOG IN TO REPLY
FarmerTed1971
fondling the 5D4
FarmerTed1971's Avatar
Joined Sep 2013
Portland, OR
Sep 20, 2017 16:40 |  #25

Too late.  :p


Getting better at this - Fuji Xt-2 - 18-55 - 35 f2 WR - 50-140 - 6D - 135L - 70-200 f4L IS - 600EX-RT x2 - ST-E3-RT - flickr (external link) - www.scottaticephoto.co​m (external link)

LOG IN TO REPLY
jimmy_beaner
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
Joined Oct 2010
Des Moines
Sep 20, 2017 16:43 |  #26

scorpio_e wrote in post #18456724 (external link)
" I was thinking about the PocketWizards for the staged pictures between the wedding and reception. They would give me an off camera flash into an umbrella for some soft light pictures of the bride, groom, and family"

I see your point.. Just be prepared to abandon it, if things go wrong. Sometimes the church can give you nasty reflections off the church wall and the umbrella actually makes it works.
If the minister says no, that would also resolve the issue LOL

Battery grip for the 7D... Run with it if you usually do :)
Always do. It'll actually be weird to shoot without one.
Since your wife is in the bridal party, let her manage and help with the bridal formals. Trust me it will be a HUGE help for you :) My wife does it for me and it is really helpful.

I would not have her shoot, let her enjoy the day:)
I've actually put together a list of things for the bride including: you need to have someone manage people and groupings. I include in that that she needs to have a list of what pictures she wants of her family etc.
Weddings are Soooooooo stressful and take up so much time *LOL* I am pricing so I book smaller weddings...one location... I have had it with full day weddings and 5 locations *LOL*.. I really enjoy the small weddings.

As far as a 2.8 lens and the 7D, you will be ok BUT the 6D would be a lot better.

I have shot weddings with the 40D and max iso was 1600 !!!!!

Good luck and you will get some great advice here.

POTN is the only place I went to ask :)
I just want to make sure I have enough wiggle room on the capture side that I don't get caught in a bad situation. If it were a casual shoot I wouldn't worry about it. Would the 24-70 L II provide enough "reach" to get the framing I might want? That's why I was looking 70-200 but that might be overkill or too tight... meaning I would end up renting a lens (that the bride pays for) that I wouldn't really use.


Canon 7D
Canon 35 f/1.4 L,

LOG IN TO REPLY
jimmy_beaner
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
Joined Oct 2010
Des Moines
Sep 20, 2017 16:45 |  #27

Talley wrote in post #18456725 (external link)
don't do it.

I've refused three weddings so far from family. I told them I would assist them in finding someone within their budget but I've declined due to the fact it's family and I have a wife and 4 kids that I'd like to enjoy with at the wedding. Otherwise I'll be ignoring them and would be difficult for them to understand why.

We're late enough in the game that that isn't an option. Wedding is November 4 and with 6 weeks, I won't leave someone in a bad situation. I trust my abilities enough and the work I've done prior that I can get workable images. This thread is mostly to make sure I don't forget something, to get advice from those that have been there, and to push myself to be a better photographer. Knowing the bride and groom are happy with the prior images I've taken (I've gotten better since then) makes me feel like this is doable. If she had huge edited pictures that she wanted, I would've told her no even after being volunteered. She wants reliable, decent pictures. I can do that.


Canon 7D
Canon 35 f/1.4 L,

LOG IN TO REPLY
scorpio_e
Cream of the Crop
scorpio_e's Avatar
Joined Aug 2007
Pa
Sep 20, 2017 17:12 |  #28

jimmy_beaner wrote in post #18456732 (external link)
We're late enough in the game that that isn't an option. Wedding is November 4 and with 6 weeks, I won't leave someone in a bad situation. I trust my abilities enough and the work I've done prior that I can get workable images. This thread is mostly to make sure I don't forget something, to get advice from those that have been there, and to push myself to be a better photographer. Knowing the bride and groom are happy with the prior images I've taken (I've gotten better since then) makes me feel like this is doable. If she had huge edited pictures that she wanted, I would've told her no even after being volunteered. She wants reliable, decent pictures. I can do that.

Trust me it is not too late in the game to get a reliable photographer especially for November !!!! .... but I know you REALLY want to do this *LOL* So we are here to help you :)


I will send you my timeline guide to help in a PM.


www.steelcityphotograp​hy.com (external link)

LOG IN TO REPLY
-Duck-
my head is usually in the way
-Duck-'s Avatar
Joined Apr 2016
Shelton, CT USA
Sep 20, 2017 17:23 |  #29

Personally, I turn down weddings as I am not comfortable enough doing them. Have I done them? Yep. Similar to your situation, best friend pleaded for me to shoot her daughter's wedding. Ridiculously dark hall, used flash on a stand to bounce light around. Not the best pictures but in the end they loved what they got because the alternative would have been no pictures.

Like you, I also have a 6D and a 7D. I tend to do a lot of outdoor events and put my 24/70mm on my 6D and my 70/200mm on the 7D. The crop sensor gives me a little extra reach on the long end while the full frame utilizes the wide angle effectively. In your situation I would consider experimenting with the opposite setup (6D with 70/200 and 7D with 24/70) just because you will be in a much tighter environment and won't need that extra reach the crop sensor will give you with the long lens. If you're using the 35mm the 7D will give you a bit more as well. Play with all those combinations in your house ahead of time so you can feel out each lens/camera combo's reach. By the way, both cameras take the same batteries, so you're good there. Bring your charger(s) with you.

As people have noted, things move fast during a wedding and the last thing you need to be doing is fumbling with gear. The more comfortable you are with it the better it will be for you. Years ago I was a wedding DJ so I was comfortable with the routine. If they have a DJ I suggest introducing yourself as the DJ sets the pace for the sedding and can give you heads up as to what's happening next. Personally I talk to DJ's, wait staff, maid of honor/best man or even the parents. I never bother the bride and groom unless it's time for the formals.

You'll need to work effectively, not fast. If you try to rush things that's when problems will arise. Definitely take people's advice here and practice ahead of time. Knowing your settings (in relation to subject distance) will make things go smoothly with your flash work. Bounce that light always. Balance it with your ambient light. Gel it to match the venue.

Take multiple shots of everything. You will be surprised how many closed eyes, half open eyes, movement blur, awkward photo bombs in the background and countless other stupid issues happen as you're taking photos that you won't notice until you get home. Having alternates and seconds to use to fix things helps a great deal. You may have taken a 1000 shots, that doesn't mean you have to deliver 1000.

Take this lead time to browse through wedding photos online to get ideas. Print out the ones you want to create for your wedding party and have them handy as a reference. Don't rely on memory. Your memory WILL fail you the day of the wedding. I second the notion of having a contract. CYA!

Most of all, don't stress the little things. Know there are just some things out of your control.

Enjoy, have fun and use this as a learning experience.


"If you didn't learn something new today, you wasted a day."
Unitas Photoraphy (external link)Meetup (external link)Blog (external link)Facebook (external link)Flickr (external link)500px (external link)

LOG IN TO REPLY
jimmy_beaner
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
Joined Oct 2010
Des Moines
Sep 20, 2017 20:08 as a reply to -Duck-'s post |  #30

Great advice. I'm a bit obsessive so certainly here to learn what I can.


Canon 7D
Canon 35 f/1.4 L,

LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as registered member)

2,138 views & 43 likes for this thread
I've been volunteered to shoot wedding
FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Weddings & Other Family Events


Not a member yet? Click here to register to the forums.
Registered members get all the features: search, following threads, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, settings, view hosted photos, own reviews and more...


AAA

Send feedback to staff    •   Jump to forum...    •   Rules    •   Index    •   New posts    •   RTAT    •   'Best of'    •   Gallery    •   Gear    •   Reviews    •   Polls

COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Privacy policy and cookie usage info.

POWERED BY AMASS 1.4version 1.4
made in Finland
by Pekka Saarinen
for photography-on-the.net
Spent 0.00114 for 4 database queries.
PAGE COMPLETED IN 0.02s
Latest registered member is nitnelavm
775 guests, 301 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 6106, that happened on Jun 09, 2016