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FORUMS General Gear Talk Camera Bags, Backpacks & Cases
Thread started 04 Oct 2017 (Wednesday) 21:20
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Multi-day hiking / anyone own multiple Fstopgear bags?

 
kaitlyn2004
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Oct 04, 2017 21:20 |  #1

I currently have the Loka and I do like it quite a bit. As I want to start doing multi-day hikes, I think I'll simply need more space in the bag for other overnighter necessities.

I was looking at the Tilopa, though I wonder if the 13L is very noticeable?

I also know the bags have gone a slight redesign since my Loka version, but it seems people still don't love the harnesses for long-haul hikes?

I've seen a few mentions of other hiking-oriented bags, though I really like the rear panel access and although some of them DO have it, it seems they overall compromise "too much" (on paper, at least?) to be a photo+hiking backpack...

So yeah - anyone have multiple sizes? Do you find it worthwhile or they overlap too much? What do you do for long term hikes with your photo gear, BESIDES simply downsizing your camera gear of course :p


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sawsedge
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Post has been edited 2 months ago by sawsedge.
Oct 04, 2017 21:47 |  #2

I've had similar thoughts, but I am looking at this bag instead: https://seekoutside.co​m ...0-panel-loading-backpack/ (external link) The extremely adjustable nature of the harness is what has my attention.

While I would like rear panel access, I have come to realize that I am unlikely to get the level of comfort I'd like with them.


- John

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Bcaps
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Oct 04, 2017 21:59 |  #3

If I'm doing multi-day hiking (ie, "real" backpacking with a tent and all the fixins') I leave my Tilopa at home and just bring the ICU and keep it in my "real" backpack. I don't like strapping crap to the outside of my pack (catches brush when bushwacking, throws off center of balance crossing streams on logs, talus hopping, etc) which I would have to do with the Tilopa for a multi-day overnight, not to mention it just doesn't have enough space even if I did and it doesn't carry loads of 35+ pounds anywhere near as well as a true backpacking pack. I backpack a lot in the Sierra where a bear canister is required in many areas and there just isn't enough space in any F-Stop bags for that plus everything else.

I have both a 75L and 100L pack that I use depending on length of trip/time of year. Also, if I'm hiking on non-technical terrain I have my camera attached to two optech straps on the front of my pack for easy access. If I have to scramble over talus or for water crossing I put the camera back in the ICU and use a trash compactor bag as a dry bag for the ICU.


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gremlin75
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Oct 06, 2017 02:55 |  #4

kaitlyn2004 wrote in post #18466200 (external link)
I currently have the Loka and I do like it quite a bit. As I want to start doing multi-day hikes, I think I'll simply need more space in the bag for other overnighter necessities.

What is the focus of your multiday trips? Is it for the hiking or is it for photography?

Simply put, I haven't found a camera bag that is great for multiday hikes. Photo backpacks are great for carrying camera gear and can be ok for carrying hiking gear.

If you're in it for the photography and don't plan on putting a lot of miles in then cramming other gear into the bag and strapping stuff to the outside can be made to work, though expect to be uncomfortable. But if you're going backpacking and want to a take photos while you're doing so then a dedicated backpack (for backpacking) is a far better choice.

I'd get all your gear together that you plan on taking for a trip, that need to include food and water....may people doesn't realize how much room a few days of food can take up. See how it fits in you Loka and that use that as a guide to how big of a pack you'll need.

kaitlyn2004 wrote in post #18466200 (external link)
What do you do for long term hikes with your photo gear, BESIDES simply downsizing your camera gear of course :p

When I go on a multiday backpacking tips it's for the backpacking not photography (though I use it to scout out possible locations too) so downsizing is what I do. By downsizing I just mean bringing less gear. Instead of bringing a body with the 12mm f2, 16mm f1.4 , 35mm f1.4, and 56mm f1.2 (I shoot fuji) I just bring the 18-55mm f2.8-4 and 12mm f2. The body, two lenses, and spare batteries just go inside a dry bag that sits at the top of my pack for easy access. If the weather is good I'll have the peak design capture clip on my pack and have the camera (with 18-55) clipped into it for easy access.

So like I said, decide what you want to do on your multiday trips. Bringing a ton of gear (both photography and backpacking) means extra weight and extra can mean slower and less enjoyable miles.




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Scatterbrained
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Oct 06, 2017 03:47 |  #5

Have you looked at Clik Elite? I have their Contrejour and find it pretty roomy. I can fit my Sony A7RII with 17-40 f/4, my 24-70 2.8, 14 2.8, and my plate filters and filter holder all in the camera compartment and still have room for a flash if I feel the need. Bear in mind I'm carrying a Kinesis filter bag and WCC filter holder in it's hard shell, they aren't small. That still leaves the upper compartments and "main" compartment empty for whatever.


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aliengin
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Nov 02, 2017 14:48 |  #6

I have Loka UL and Satori EXP which is Sukha now. As far as the difference, more than the size the harness is different. They have more comfortable padded harness system for longer treks. If you are looking for a large bag I would say go with the biggest you can. Mine are 37 liter vs 70 liters. Camera carrying aspect is not a lot bigger Pro Large vs PRO XL but larger one has more stuff for clothing, food etc.


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kaitlyn2004
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Nov 02, 2017 21:41 |  #7

aliengin wrote in post #18487056 (external link)
I have Loka UL and Satori EXP which is Sukha now. As far as the difference, more than the size the harness is different. They have more comfortable padded harness system for longer treks. If you are looking for a large bag I would say go with the biggest you can. Mine are 37 liter vs 70 liters. Camera carrying aspect is not a lot bigger Pro Large vs PRO XL but larger one has more stuff for clothing, food etc.

Ah for some reason I thought the Sukha was bigger. But holy its 4.6lbs for the bag alone. Add in ICU and the "bag" is pretty darn heavy as a base!


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kaitlyn2004
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Post has been edited 1 month ago by kaitlyn2004.
Nov 03, 2017 23:20 |  #8

aliengin wrote in post #18487056 (external link)
I have Loka UL and Satori EXP which is Sukha now. As far as the difference, more than the size the harness is different. They have more comfortable padded harness system for longer treks. If you are looking for a large bag I would say go with the biggest you can. Mine are 37 liter vs 70 liters. Camera carrying aspect is not a lot bigger Pro Large vs PRO XL but larger one has more stuff for clothing, food etc.

Haven't got a bag yet - but really considering the Sukha now! I know it's not identical to the Satori - but any comments about it? Have you taken it on multi-day treks? How does it hold up?

I definitely still worry about the weight though. 4.6lbs starting weight for the bare bag is quite a bit more than the other "hiking bags" in this size.


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jlt23
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Nov 05, 2017 14:59 |  #9

I have a Loka and a Sukha. I haven’t used the Sukha yet but I bought it to carry my 600mm. It’s pretty tall and bulky with the super tele ICU. The material is not as flexible as the Loka but it’s supposed to be more water resistant.


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kaitlyn2004
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Nov 05, 2017 17:24 |  #10

jlt23 wrote in post #18489339 (external link)
I have a Loka and a Sukha. I haven’t used the Sukha yet but I bought it to carry my 600mm. It’s pretty tall and bulky with the super tele ICU. The material is not as flexible as the Loka but it’s supposed to be more water resistant.

My biggest lens is the 100-400 II. I have a Medium + Large Pro ICU, but on this trip only the medium. I am constantly debating between the Tilopa, the Sukha, or a "real" hiking bag. I went in to the stores today and the hiking bag back panels + waist belts look like a dream - but of course I'm also like "where do I easily attach my tripod", "how can I access my gear easily" etc.


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jcothron
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Nov 05, 2017 17:29 |  #11

I've had a satori for years. It works great for day hikes with equipment, tripod strapped to the outside. In my opinion it MIGHT be okay for a 1 nighter if you use a smaller icu and use the space for food, clothes etc.

For a multi day hike I would most definitely use a real backpack and pack photo gear inside it with tripod on the outside.


John
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kaitlyn2004
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Nov 05, 2017 18:39 |  #12

jcothron wrote in post #18489460 (external link)
For a multi day hike I would most definitely use a real backpack and pack photo gear inside it with tripod on the outside.

Just wondering why you say this? I'm THINKING regardless I'd be hiking with the camera on a strap around me, and I suppose on longer hiking adventures you aren't just suddenly/randomly stopping to change lenses and take photos... but I do worry about the access to gear being quite difficult - virtually all seem to be top-load, and I've seen some with side zippers but they just don't look big enough to access gear through


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Bcaps
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Post has been last edited 1 month ago by Bcaps. 5 edits done in total.
Nov 05, 2017 21:39 as a reply to kaitlyn2004's post |  #13

Because hiking offtrail, over unstable talus, in the rain, or crossing streams puts a camera around your neck at risk. When I'm backpacking and hiking on a trail I will carry my camera outside of my pack attached to optech straps on D-rings on my pack, but if I have to go offtrail, cross a stream or hike in inclement weather I put my camera inside my pack (in a drybag). For mutliday hikes where you are carrying a lot of gear and perhaps 40+ pounds there is no F-stop bag that compares to a "real" backpack for load carrying comfort, stability and capacity.


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sawsedge
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Nov 05, 2017 22:56 |  #14

kaitlyn2004 wrote in post #18489494 (external link)
Just wondering why you say this? I'm THINKING regardless I'd be hiking with the camera on a strap around me, and I suppose on longer hiking adventures you aren't just suddenly/randomly stopping to change lenses and take photos... but I do worry about the access to gear being quite difficult - virtually all seem to be top-load, and I've seen some with side zippers but they just don't look big enough to access gear through

This is why I linked that panel loader near the top of the thread. https://seekoutside.co​m ...0-panel-loading-backpack/ (external link)

The only flaw I can see is the front opening instead of rear (but this pack is supposed to handle 100 lbs, and is lighter than most).


- John

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jcothron
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Nov 06, 2017 06:14 |  #15

kaitlyn2004 wrote in post #18489494 (external link)
Just wondering why you say this? I'm THINKING regardless I'd be hiking with the camera on a strap around me, and I suppose on longer hiking adventures you aren't just suddenly/randomly stopping to change lenses and take photos... but I do worry about the access to gear being quite difficult - virtually all seem to be top-load, and I've seen some with side zippers but they just don't look big enough to access gear through

Access to gear is a trade-off to balance with the need to carry heavy loads comfortably. As an example, if I were just worried about gear access only I would carry my Domke F1x shoulder bag. It is easy to work out of, is always accessible at my side, etc. I certainly can't backpack into the wilderness with it however. My Fstop I can hike really well with, and carry all my gear (35 lbs or so) but I have to take it off to change a lens, etc. Also, if I'm carrying all my gear, the Fstop frankly just doesn't have enough room inside or outside to also carry what I would need for a multi-day trip. Even if it did, it would be relatively heavy (60 lbs minimum if I carry my photo gear). At that way, no camera pack I'm aware of has a suspension system to really carry that load comfortably especially if you are crossing streams or scrambling down hill sides.

Now, you could minimize your photo equipment, which I personally would have to in order to have room for backpacking gear for more than a single night out. You have a tent, sleeping bag, food, water or the equipment to filter it, change of clothes, etc. The Fstop bags, nice as they are, don't carry these items all that well. The tent and sleeping bag in particular would need to be strapped to the outside, and unless you have a really small tripod that would need to be on the outside as well. It can and does make for a somewhat unbalanced load on a bag that doesn't have a true suspension system for carrying it.

My Bora 90 however, has a sleeping bag compartment, the ability to pack a tent inside it if I really need to, as well as the ability to carry my photo equipment inside it. What I usually do is carry a photo vest to use when I'm actually shooting, which gives me something to work out of without carrying the pack around.

Everyone has different needs when shooting. My equipment is such that I need the ability to carry a significant amount of weight if I'm out for more than a night, and after using an Fstop for years (and I love the pack) it just isn't really meant for that purpose in my opinion. Could it be done? Of course, but I don't think it would be very enjoyable...too many compromises to make.


John
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Multi-day hiking / anyone own multiple Fstopgear bags?
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