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FORUMS General Gear Talk Camera Bags, Backpacks & Cases
Thread started 17 Nov 2017 (Friday) 01:07
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Camera access in a hiking bag?

 
kaitlyn2004
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Nov 17, 2017 01:07 |  #1

I've got a hiking bag for longer/proper hiking, but of course now the problem becomes not only putting my camera gear in the bag, but being able to access it.

It is a toploader, though it does have a back zipper to get stuff the middle of the bag(doesn't open fully)

I am traveling and have a medium ICU with me, but it may be a bit bigger than I need - plus the way it opens doesn't really make it easy to work with in this type of bag. I'm familiar with the Tennant BYOB inserts which open from the top and may work well, but I haven't really seen one in person.

I'm traveling NZ so I don't have the luxury of some knockoff from eBay and just waiting for it (or maybe I do! If it wouldn't take FOREVER I could ship it somewhere in advance of me)

Are there other inserts to consider? Another way to store/access my gear when hiking?

I'll have:
- canon 5d (if not strapped around my body...)
- 16-35 f4l is
- 70-200 f4lis
- MAYBE sigma 35 1.4 depending on trip
- MAYBE mavic drone (+controller +batteries)

The drone wouldn't need to be accessed as quickly, but yeah...


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Scatterbrained
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Nov 17, 2017 01:24 |  #2

Have you looked into lens/body wraps? I've done it when hiking a river where I needed everything in a dry sac. Packed the bag and then just put the camera gear on top with protective wraps on them.


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kaitlyn2004
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Nov 17, 2017 02:27 |  #3

Scatterbrained wrote in post #18498326 (external link)
Have you looked into lens/body wraps? I've done it when hiking a river where I needed everything in a dry sac. Packed the bag and then just put the camera gear on top with protective wraps on them.

I've heard of them but honestly hadn't given them too much thought. You like them? Did you buy actual "lens wraps" or some diy version? My 16-35 and sigma are close enough in size, but the 70-200 is thinner and far longer... I guess doing something like that let's me stuff them separately or even put them in single bag/padded bag together


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Scatterbrained
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Nov 17, 2017 02:32 |  #4

kaitlyn2004 wrote in post #18498336 (external link)
I've heard of them but honestly hadn't given them too much thought. You like them? Did you buy actual "lens wraps" or some diy version? My 16-35 and sigma are close enough in size, but the 70-200 is thinner and far longer... I guess doing something like that let's me stuff them separately or even put them in single bag/padded bag together

They are just padded fabric with velcro. Wrap them around the lens or camera and let the velcro hold them shut. I just tossed my camera and two lenses in the dry sac that way and it worked fine for me. Granted, it may have contributed to the flattened sandwiches we ate that afternoon. . . .


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Littlejon ­ Dsgn
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Nov 17, 2017 10:44 |  #5

When I do hiking trips even day hikes to some extent I have a front load chest mount case that clips onto my hiking pack, makes for safe but easy to get to storage of the camera and a lens. If I need to change lenses then I have to get into the backpack but I find if I need to change lenses is for a longer set up anyways and I would already be taking the bag off.




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cigargreg
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Nov 17, 2017 10:49 |  #6

I have an Osprey Statos 34 and have been looking at getting a Tenba BYOB 13 for it, right now I am just using lens bags and have a wrap for the camera. Even with the access issues, I find this much better than a "camera back pack" while hiking as they are so heavy.


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Bcaps
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Nov 17, 2017 11:19 |  #7

I just reach into my backpack and pull out the ICU and I'm ready to go. I think it sounds more cumbersome that it is, especially if you are used to using an F-stop bag. But in practice it only takes seconds to drop your bag and reach in and grab the ICU. If I am hiking into my location I keep the ICU at the top of the bag for easier access. If I have already set up camp and am day hiking then the ICU is just about the only thing in the bag and it's at the bottom. Either way it is quick and easy to get to.


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Hokie ­ Jim
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Nov 17, 2017 19:44 |  #8

I love the Mountainsmith Parallax while on the move, but being a side-loading bag, the access is awful. You have to stop and set everything down to get the gear out.


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kaitlyn2004
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Nov 18, 2017 21:49 |  #9

Littlejon Dsgn wrote in post #18498512 (external link)
When I do hiking trips even day hikes to some extent I have a front load chest mount case that clips onto my hiking pack, makes for safe but easy to get to storage of the camera and a lens. If I need to change lenses then I have to get into the backpack but I find if I need to change lenses is for a longer set up anyways and I would already be taking the bag off.

Which bag do you use for the chest? I will have up to 3 lenses but would only require access to 2 (including one already mounted to camera). Wonder if maybe I should just stick the other single lens in even bubble wrap at the top or something...

One thing I struggle with the idea of a front camera bag is the 16-35 f4l is a shorter lens whereas my 70-200f4 is also sorta thinner but far longer... Not sure how to accommodate both!


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Littlejon ­ Dsgn
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Nov 18, 2017 22:00 |  #10

kaitlyn2004 wrote in post #18499466 (external link)
Which bag do you use for the chest? I will have up to 3 lenses but would only require access to 2 (including one already mounted to camera). Wonder if maybe I should just stick the other single lens in even bubble wrap at the top or something...

One thing I struggle with the idea of a front camera bag is the 16-35 f4l is a shorter lens whereas my 70-200f4 is also sorta thinner but far longer... Not sure how to accommodate both!

Lowpro Top loader. The one I have fits the 70-200 mounted. If I go with something shorter it also fits. However I only put the camera and mounted lens in the bag. The rest of the gear is in the backpack. You could always get a belt mounted pouch for the second lens.




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Charlie
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Nov 24, 2017 11:18 |  #11

You want the think tank holster with popdown to handle lens discrepancies. Digital holster 10 or 20.

If my sole purpose for the hike is photography, think tank belt system is fastest to access, and gives you best balance when climbing, lower center of gravity.


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MalVeauX
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Nov 24, 2017 11:43 |  #12

I will second the approach of using a belt system and lens holders that attach there instead of trying to keep it all in a bag on your back. You can open the holders at your waist to get at anything you need. Less fatiguing to hike long distance. Better balance. Your lenses are small, so you could get away with it.

You can also use them on a backpack so that they're not even in the backpack and simply attach to the outside of it and are still instantly accessible.

Very best,


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kaitlyn2004
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Nov 24, 2017 18:21 |  #13

Charlie wrote in post #18503247 (external link)
You want the think tank holster with popdown to handle lens discrepancies. Digital holster 10 or 20.

If my sole purpose for the hike is photography, think tank belt system is fastest to access, and gives you best balance when climbing, lower center of gravity.

I don't think any local store has that item so I'd have to buy it sight unseen. It looks like the 10 would be too small to accommodate a 5d with l bracket attached?

How does using the holster like this, attached to my backpack straps, compare to just having it on asking strap hanging by my waist? I suppose something like makes it easier in bad weather, but doesn't have space to secure a second lens or something. Not sure how the belt system would work with my existing hiking bag belt... But yeah.

Basically I'm naively asking what good is just the holster bag?


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Camera access in a hiking bag?
FORUMS General Gear Talk Camera Bags, Backpacks & Cases


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