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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Astronomy & Celestial 
Thread started 15 Dec 2017 (Friday) 19:57
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Fresh go at Orion.

 
Pagman
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Dec 15, 2017 19:57 |  #1

Hi folks, I was given an early xams prezzy yesterday in the shape of a lovely ball head tripod, and as it was clear but cold outside - I was eager to try it out, orion was out and showing him self nice and clear so I set my tripod up and fired away.
The tripod was a delight to use - the ball head so easy and so much better at locking down my cam/lens combo, yet really easy at doing subtle adjustments.
Anyway this time I tried for 1.3sec and f4.5 but still the highest Iso my body goes to 6400.

Here is the processed result.

P.


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Olympus E-M1 and some Zuiko glass

  
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Roy ­ A. ­ Rust
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Dec 16, 2017 13:26 |  #2

Pagman wrote in post #18518916 (external link)
Hi folks, I was given an early xams prezzy yesterday in the shape of a lovely ball head tripod, and as it was clear but cold outside - I was eager to try it out, orion was out and showing him self nice and clear so I set my tripod up and fired away.
The tripod was a delight to use - the ball head so easy and so much better at locking down my cam/lens combo, yet really easy at doing subtle adjustments.
Anyway this time I tried for 1.3sec and f4.5 but still the highest Iso my body goes to 6400.

Here is the processed result.

P.


thumbnail
Hosted photo: posted by Pagman in
./showthread.php?p=185​18916&i=i77045830
forum: Astronomy & Celestial

Hey - you're making progress, but it will be tough with your limited equipment.

Just a couple of comments: The sky isn't pitch black. Darkening it to that extreme also causes a LOT of details in faint objects, like the nebula in Orion, to be lost. The sky is full of faint stars, too, and as you darken the sky, the faint ones disappear. I tried to adjust it after downloading it, but only managed a little improvement in the detail in the nebula before causing other distortion. The data wasn't there after posting it on POTN. But a lot more details in the nebula were there, just hidden by how dark you made it. Back off on the Gamma and Contrast to show the maximum number of dim stars before getting the sky too bright. Aim for a dark grey rather than black.

Also, the colors look totally fake due to the excessive saturation. They shouldn't be so bright and intense. Go for more realistic rather than spectacular, and just saturate it enough to make the colors as bright and saturated as other images you see posted on here. A lighter sky and less saturation will make it look much better. Check other postings and decide which ones look best, then try to adjust yours to look like the ones you prefer. I don't think the best ones will have so much contrast that only the brightest stars show up.

As you found out with the ball head tripod, the proper equipment makes a lot of difference in pursuing your goals. Now, you need to request a tracking mount for your next birthday!!! Maybe get an early birthday, too!

Glad to see you being so persistent, though. This stuff is addictive! Hang in there...




  
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Pagman
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Dec 16, 2017 16:48 |  #3

I thought I would re do them so I have put the files including the previous nights ones together in deep sky stacker, I will see how the processing goes after by using by Lr5 and photo cr2.

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Pagman
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Dec 16, 2017 18:11 |  #4

Had a third go at processing.

P.


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Roy ­ A. ­ Rust
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Dec 16, 2017 19:45 |  #5

Pagman wrote in post #18519584 (external link)
Had a third go at processing.

P.


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Well, in my opinion, the last one is a LOT better. Not so drastic with the oversaturated colors, and not so much contrast, which would eliminate so many faint objects. Now, a lot of faint stars are visible. I'm certainly no expert on post-processing, but I like this much better. You learn as you experiment, so keep trying different things to see what you think works best. Don't limit yourself to the default settings in DSS, either. Experiment with all the controls to find out what they do. You can alter the appearance of your pictures a lot with those controls. I usually save about 6 to 10 versions of the changes I make after DSS finishes stacking mine. Each time I make an improvement, I save it, just in case it's the best I can do... and then try other adjustments, and save another one.

I think most camera lenses suffer from vignetting - producing images that are darker around the outside than in the middle. My D5500 has a "Vignette Control" in the "Shooting" menu, that increases peripheral illumination. Don't know if your camera has this setting or not, but it helps balance the illumination all across the image. Even with the vignette control set to "High" my photos are still darker around the outside edges than in the middle. A lot of imaging software includes adjustments to vary the amount of lighting around the periphery of the pictures, as well.

But, even with the vignette control, it would be beneficial to learn to take "Flat Frames", which would help with the vignetting during stacking.

Still, you're making some serious progress. Keep at it! And have fun!




  
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Pagman
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Dec 16, 2017 20:23 |  #6

Roy A. Rust wrote in post #18519656 (external link)
Well, in my opinion, the last one is a LOT better. Not so drastic with the oversaturated colors, and not so much contrast, which would eliminate so many faint objects. Now, a lot of faint stars are visible. I'm certainly no expert on post-processing, but I like this much better. You learn as you experiment, so keep trying different things to see what you think works best. Don't limit yourself to the default settings in DSS, either. Experiment with all the controls to find out what they do. You can alter the appearance of your pictures a lot with those controls. I usually save about 6 to 10 versions of the changes I make after DSS finishes stacking mine. Each time I make an improvement, I save it, just in case it's the best I can do... and then try other adjustments, and save another one.

I think most camera lenses suffer from vignetting - producing images that are darker around the outside than in the middle. My D5500 has a "Vignette Control" in the "Shooting" menu, that increases peripheral illumination. Don't know if your camera has this setting or not, but it helps balance the illumination all across the image. Even with the vignette control set to "High" my photos are still darker around the outside edges than in the middle. A lot of imaging software includes adjustments to vary the amount of lighting around the periphery of the pictures, as well.

But, even with the vignette control, it would be beneficial to learn to take "Flat Frames", which would help with the vignetting during stacking.

Still, you're making some serious progress. Keep at it! And have fun!

Thank you roy, your feedback helps me a lot between you and mal I have learned so much, its such an intersting hobby and now I have my new tripod its 100% more relaxing not having a camera slowly creep due to its weight, and being able to make finite adjustments with the ball head is brilliant.

P.


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Dec 18, 2017 01:54 |  #7

Pagman wrote in post #18519584 (external link)
Had a third go at processing.

P.


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I agree with Roy, for the same reasons

this one is so very much better
keep up the good experimenting :-)

Dave


A picture is worth 1000 words ;)
Canon 5D3, 6D, 700D, a bunch of lenses and other bits, ohhh and some Pentax stuff ;)

  
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Dec 24, 2017 16:13 |  #8

how many frames did you take, and were you on a star tracker




  
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Pagman
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Dec 24, 2017 16:25 |  #9

Marcy wrote in post #18525594 (external link)
how many frames did you take, and were you on a star tracker


Hi, no tracker just 95 x 1 and 1.3sec single frames, then put through Deep Space Stacker.

P.


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Dec 24, 2017 19:04 as a reply to  @ Pagman's post |  #10

thanks for the info - I guess I might have to try that




  
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Pagman
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Dec 24, 2017 21:08 |  #11

Marcy wrote in post #18525684 (external link)
thanks for the info - I guess I might have to try that


Well worth a go, Im just learning the basics of deep space photography, and loving it as long as the sky is clear and its not too cold, I dont mind sitting out for hours seeing what I get with my gear.

P.


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Dec 25, 2017 21:35 |  #12

you did 95+ shots of 1 to 1.3 sec and then stacked them did you use an intervolemter to automate the shots and did you move you camera/lens to keep the target in the middle - about 2 minutes total time - I have a 400 mm (with or without a 2x teleconverter) that I can set up or a 70-200 + 1.4 tele converter I can put on a star tracker- or just the 400 mm f/4 what would you suggest




  
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Roy ­ A. ­ Rust
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Dec 27, 2017 18:49 |  #13

Hey, Pagman, I remember a while back that you mentioned you had a hard time finding your targets with the 400mm lens. I had the same problem. It's hard to figure out where your camera is pointing when trying to aim at a faint object that's too dim to see in the viewfinder or on the live view.

I solved that problem by buying a green-dot sight, and making a hot-shoe mount for it. I don't know how handy you are with tools and making things like that, but if you don't want to try to make one, there are solutions online you can purchase to solve the aiming problems. I searched for "Hot-Shoe Adapters" and for red/green dot sights, and found these. There are others, as well, but these seem to be about as good as any.

I have two sights. One is on my tracker, to help locate Polaris really fast, and the other is on my camera, to point the lens at whatever I'm trying to image. It's a lot easier than taking a lot of pictures and hoping to finally get the object in the frame.

To align the sight with the camera lens, you first center a distant object in the viewfinder, then adjust the sight to center it on the object. After that, it's easy to point the camera right at your object of interest - no more searching. For $28 you can eliminate a lot of wasted time and frustration. That's especially nice on a cold winter night!


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Pagman
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Dec 27, 2017 19:09 |  #14

Roy A. Rust wrote in post #18527557 (external link)
Hey, Pagman, I remember a while back that you mentioned you had a hard time finding your targets with the 400mm lens. I had the same problem. It's hard to figure out where your camera is pointing when trying to aim at a faint object that's too dim to see in the viewfinder or on the live view.

I solved that problem by buying a green-dot sight, and making a hot-shoe mount for it. I don't know how handy you are with tools and making things like that, but if you don't want to try to make one, there are solutions online you can purchase to solve the aiming problems. I searched for "Hot-Shoe Adapters" and for red/green dot sights, and found these. There are others, as well, but these seem to be about as good as any.

I have two sights. One is on my tracker, to help locate Polaris really fast, and the other is on my camera, to point the lens at whatever I'm trying to image. It's a lot easier than taking a lot of pictures and hoping to finally get the object in the frame.

To align the sight with the camera lens, you first center a distant object in the viewfinder, then adjust the sight to center it on the object. After that, it's easy to point the camera right at your object of interest - no more searching. For $28 you can eliminate a lot of wasted time and frustration. That's especially nice on a cold winter night!
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./showthread.php?p=185​27557&i=i179325554
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forum: Astronomy & Celestial

Thanks for that roy, but surely you still need to see what you are aiming at so you can put a green/red laser point on it, with Andromeda I could not see anything how ever I tried.
I had more luck with Orion as I kno where it is and find it easy to track.

P.


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Roy ­ A. ­ Rust
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Post edited 3 months ago by Roy A. Rust.
     
Dec 28, 2017 00:37 |  #15

Pagman wrote in post #18527574 (external link)
Thanks for that roy, but surely you still need to see what you are aiming at so you can put a green/red laser point on it, with Andromeda I could not see anything how ever I tried.
I had more luck with Orion as I kno where it is and find it easy to track.

P.

I can't see the Andromeda Galaxy from where I live, either, but I know the stars that lead to it, so I can just put the green dot at the end of the trail of stars I can see, and make final adjustments after taking a picture. But I can always get the galaxy in the frame just by star-stepping to where I know the galaxy is. There are a LOT of interesting objects that you need to learn how to find by star-stepping, and the red/green dot sight will allow you to do that very easily - unless you want to limit your photos to bright objects that you can see in live view. Even with things like the Orion Nebula, you can get it into the center of the frame easily with a sight like this. Just thought I'd offer you an easier way. No problem.




  
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Fresh go at Orion.
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