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FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos RAW, Post Processing & Printing
Thread started 14 Jan 2018 (Sunday) 11:28
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Looking for input in finding photo printer

 
SpiderMonkey
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Pearland, Texas
Jan 14, 2018 11:28 |  #1

I am looking to get advice on a good quality printer for printing my own photos.
I'm considering the Canon PIXMA Pro-100, so-far it appears that the Pro-100 is a good printer that produces quality photos with the most common complaint being the ink usage. I've read up on quite a few different printers and am so far convinced that for the price it is the right choice BUT, because this is all new to me and I'm actually interested in being able to print the best quality photos for the best price, I am in need of any help and input that can be given.

What printers are good choices, of these what are the benefits vs. drawbacks? I'm looking at a budget price to not exceed $500.

Thank you for any input/advice you can give.




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Bassat
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Jan 14, 2018 11:42 |  #2

The only advice I can offer on printing at home is: Don't. Farming it out is less expensive, less hassle, and gives you better results, mostly. I use Walmart, and am completely happy with their work.


Tom

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SpiderMonkey
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Jan 14, 2018 12:30 |  #3

That has actually crossed my mind as an option.
I use Walmart for a lot of photos already.




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Bassat
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Jan 14, 2018 13:11 |  #4

I gave up printing my own photos about 3 years ago. Walmart does fine job. If you order 50+ 4"x6" prints, they are about 9 cents each. I think the last 11"x17" print I ordered was about $11. I do most of my ordering online, and they mail me prints. In-store, or by mail, they stand behind their work. If you don't like it, they'll print it again, FREE. I was having problems with one 8"x10". They printed it again, two or three times. I still didn't like it. The store manager let me adjust the machine until I liked what I saw on the screen. I got a good print. You can't beat that kind of service.


Tom

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agedbriar
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Post has been edited 1 month ago by agedbriar.
Jan 14, 2018 13:28 |  #5

Printing at home is one more bit of DIY satisfaction in this photography hobby of ours. Of course we must pay for it. ;-)a

Pro 100 is a good printer but it uses dye inks, which fade faster (especially third party inks). For really high longevity you need pigment inks, as used by the Pro 10 and Pro 1.




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RMyers
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Jan 14, 2018 14:59 |  #6

Printing your own shots can be an exciting process. If you only want to print small, 4x6 up to 8x10, then I'd suggest Walgreens, Costco and the likes. If you want to print larger images that exactly match what you see on the screen then doing your own is very satisfying. You'll need to plan on a device to calibrate your screen too. A color munki or Datacolor spyder.

Just don't expect to plug in the printer and get great results right away. There is some learning involved.


Rusty
Austin, TX

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ejenner
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Jan 14, 2018 18:16 |  #7

agedbriar wrote in post #18540744 (external link)
Printing at home is one more bit of DIY satisfaction in this photography hobby of ours. Of course we must pay for it. ;-)a


I think this should be one of the main reasons for printing at home. Also I agree that if you are just printing 'small' it's probably not worth it.

With the smaller less expensive printers, ink costs are definitely concern - actually they can be with any printer. That's how they make their money. When I got the Epsom 3880 it came with $400 of ink and the total cost was $900.

I print almost exclusively 13x19 and larger and will often make 2-3 prints until I get everything exactly how I want it. I've sent larger than 17inch prints away, but I'll print it at home at 13x18 or so first. But, yes, I pay for it with ink and paper and I don't do it for cost efficiency. But I loved making my own prints in the darkroom and equally like the process of seeing my work come off the printer at home.


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http://www.flickr.com/​photos/48305795@N03/ (external link)
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SpiderMonkey
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Jan 14, 2018 18:31 |  #8

I have an HP printer that I was not really satisfied with when it came to printing photos but the normal documents were always great.
After I started this thread, I saw the sticky "Beginners Guide to Printing", it was an eye opener.
I realized that the possibility existed that I might be able to make some changes to my printer settings and end up with better prints. Sure enough, I made some selection changes and wow, the quality is in stark contrast to what it was just a couple hours before.
So, I still welcome the input but I feel that the simple realization has bought me some time in selecting a new printer.

Thank you to everyone for all the input so far.
By the way, I too enjoy printing my pictures as part of my photo hobby, hence a major part of the reason I don't want to spend an arm and a leg, it's just for my own enjoyment.




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lilkngster
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NJ
Jan 17, 2018 19:59 as a reply to SpiderMonkey's post |  #9

The sticky and your presumed multipurpose printer are a great place to start, but difference between your HP and a dedicated photo printer would become obvious if you held them side by side. Pixma Pro-100 is a great introduction to dedicated photo printing. Currently there is a $150 after rebate deal for the printer and 50 sheets of 13 x 19 paper and there are probably cheaper deals on craigslist like sites with people getting rid of their printers after claiming their 2017 rebates.

You could set the printer up out of box, install the right drivers/files, shoot jpeg, and print directly from windows/preview and get decent results. But to get the "best" quality, you could shoot RAW, edit with software on a calibrated monitor, use the correct profiles for ink and your paper choice. Then its a lot of time, patience, and practice, eventually breaking the original budget (just like my original dslr camera budget).

This guy (Jose Rodriguez) has a dedicated channel devoted to printing and a lot of videos that are very informative. This is a good one to start with and see if you are REALLY ready to commit and for the right reasons: https://www.youtube.co​m/watch?v=d-PNNQTuY4o (external link)


6dII/80d/1dIII|8mm to 400mm|Pro-10/100

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elitejp
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Jan 18, 2018 03:32 |  #10

I was really wanting to do my own printing especially since most printer shops (where im located out of the usa) would rarely get the color right. But after reading about the initial setup cost, the amount of wasted ink, clogged heads, short printer life, test runs on paper before actually doing your print etc i will still choose to not invest in a printer. It seems fun and i love diy but for this the cost of having a shop print it out compared to doing yourself there just isnt a good reason to do it yourself.


6D; canon 85mm 1.8, Tamron 24-70mm VC, Canon 135L Canon 70-200L is ii

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SpiderMonkey
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Jan 18, 2018 20:02 |  #11

lilkngster wrote in post #18543426 (external link)
The sticky and your presumed multipurpose printer are a great place to start, but difference between your HP and a dedicated photo printer would become obvious if you held them side by side. Pixma Pro-100 is a great introduction to dedicated photo printing. Currently there is a $150 after rebate deal for the printer and 50 sheets of 13 x 19 paper and there are probably cheaper deals on craigslist like sites with people getting rid of their printers after claiming their 2017 rebates.

You could set the printer up out of box, install the right drivers/files, shoot jpeg, and print directly from windows/preview and get decent results. But to get the "best" quality, you could shoot RAW, edit with software on a calibrated monitor, use the correct profiles for ink and your paper choice. Then its a lot of time, patience, and practice, eventually breaking the original budget (just like my original dslr camera budget).

This guy (Jose Rodriguez) has a dedicated channel devoted to printing and a lot of videos that are very informative. This is a good one to start with and see if you are REALLY ready to commit and for the right reasons: https://www.youtube.co​m/watch?v=d-PNNQTuY4o (external link)

Wow! That video is extremely informative! Definitely makes me think in lines of the commitment that comes with photo printing. I'm not sure that I would have a need to print a photo every couple days, I figure that within the first couple weeks I would have all the pictures printed that I would be most interested in and then after that, I would be printing pictures just to keep the printer clean with the occasional desired picture printing thrown in here and there. I know that I'm exaggerating it and simplifying it but, reality would be somewhat along those lines so, it means that I really need to sit down and think about the reality of the cost vs. the reality of how much I would actually use it and what the real intention is (just a hobby or maybe wanting to start selling some of my photos) plus, as others have already pointed out, Walmart does a really good job of printing for a very good price.




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lilkngster
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Post has been edited 1 month ago by lilkngster.
Jan 19, 2018 10:34 as a reply to SpiderMonkey's post |  #12

Don't let the video scare you off. If I had seen it when I first started with a pro-10, I probably would have, or Jose would say I SHOULD have, stuck with online/pharmacy printing. For me, its is part of MY non professional photography ride. At first it was the basics like portrait vs landscape mode on my first DSLR to getting manual lens and film body to ending up with a printer from a rebate, with lots of different experiences in between.

Financially, my cost per print makes no sense. I am by no means a print master, but editing and printing at home had changed and added to my shooting process. For example, I look more at framing now as part of my pre-shutter prep, I look at the overall "contrast"of the scene for potential BW printing, I might see certain colors/lighting that might "pop" on metallic paper, I try to get the exposure right so I don't have to edit as much, etc.

I also give my prints away. I like seeing happy faces when I give them an actual print, in this digital age, and I REALLY like seeing my stuff on other people's walls!

All of that makes it worth it to me.


6dII/80d/1dIII|8mm to 400mm|Pro-10/100

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CyberDyneSystems
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Jan 19, 2018 11:10 |  #13

A- Don't look at it from a cost stand point, look at it from a creative standpoint.

Do you like to let the camera chose the image quality and color, etc or do you post process? If you like to be in control of your own creative process, do the printing yourself and don't gamble with farming out.

B- From a cost standpoint, if you shop around, NO outside source can beat the economy of the Pro 100 when Canon will in fact PAY YOU to take one off of their hands and then give you years of free paper.

Just shop the deals in the Market Watch section of this forum and you will get the printer, and paper and be out nothing.


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CyberDyneSystems
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Post has been edited 1 month ago by CyberDyneSystems.
Jan 19, 2018 11:12 |  #14

agedbriar wrote in post #18540744 (external link)
... but it uses dye inks, which fade faster (especially third party inks). For really high longevity you need pigment inks, as used by the Pro 10 and Pro 1.


This is true-ish, but also very out of date. 10 years ago what you said was exactly right. Most Dye formulas now have come a long way in longevity. The Pro 100 inks for example are very stable. We are talking about the difference between a very long time, and a very very very long time now in most cases.

Yes, if you are worried that your images may be fading after you die, then by all means insist on pigment. IMHO they aren't fading as fast as most color film prints.


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CyberDyneSystems
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Jan 19, 2018 11:26 |  #15

elitejp wrote in post #18543601 (external link)
I was really wanting to do my own printing especially since most printer shops (where im located out of the usa) would rarely get the color right. But after reading about the initial setup cost, the amount of wasted ink, clogged heads, short printer life, test runs on paper before actually doing your print etc i will still choose to not invest in a printer. It seems fun and i love diy but for this the cost of having a shop print it out compared to doing yourself there just isnt a good reason to do it yourself.


Although I know that this can be true, I used to go through epson and HP printers almost annually, but they were the lower quality ones back when printers cost a LOT.

Since going Canon for Inkjet, I have never run into a longevity problem.
In fact, my 1st Canon wide format (13" i9100 purchased in 2004) is still going strong after years and years of neglect and abuse!
http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthre​ad.php?t=545282

https://c2.staticflick​r.com ...58583371_886964c8d3​_b.jpg (external link)


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