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FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos Video and Sound Editing
Thread started 27 Jan 2018 (Saturday) 23:06
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Lighting a 2-Person Interview?

 
kcrossley
Senior Member
250 posts
Joined Feb 2009
Williamsburg, VA
Jan 27, 2018 23:06 |  #1

I'm familiar with the 3-point light system when filming a single person, but how do you setup your key, fill, and backlights for two people?


Cameras/Lenses: Canon 80D, Canon 70D, Canon 18-55mm, 50mm, 10-18mm, and 55-250mm Lenses
Accessories: Case Logic SLRC-206 Backpack, Canon Speedlite 430EX III-RT, Canon RC-6 Wireless Remote, Davis & Sanford TR653C-V9 Carbon Fiber Tripod, Aputure Amaran HR672 LED Light Kit, Kamerar DF-1M Softboxes

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SailingAway
Senior Member
295 posts
Joined Sep 2013
Jan 28, 2018 11:19 |  #2

I didn’t want to write an article-length post, but a quick google search turned up a couple great examples.

Figure 4 of ths article shows a classic approach. (external link) I would play the keys a bit more to the side, depending. Keying from the front and filling from the back is sometimes called on-side or strong-side key.

The first setup in this article shows a more contemporary approach (external link). Note that it is keyed from the back, sometimes called a weak-side or off-side key. “Contemporary” because it’s all soft sources, and the keys are motivated from a more natural location representing window light.

These are just starting points of course...

The kino fixtures in the second article are 4’ wide and 2’ wide to get those soft wraps. 4’ can be rented, or, you could use a couple of smaller soft boxes in front.


From the upper left corner of the U.S.
Photos, Video & Pano r us.
College and workshop instructor in video and audio.
70D, Sigma 8mm, Tokina f2.8 11-16, Canon EF-S f2.8 17-55, Sigma f2.8 50-150 EX OS, Tamron 150-600VC. Gigapan Epic Pro, Nodal Ninja 5 & R10.

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kcrossley
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
250 posts
Joined Feb 2009
Williamsburg, VA
Jan 28, 2018 20:58 as a reply to SailingAway's post |  #3

Thanks SailingAway. I'm lighting this with (3) Aputure Amaran HR762's with soft boxes.


Cameras/Lenses: Canon 80D, Canon 70D, Canon 18-55mm, 50mm, 10-18mm, and 55-250mm Lenses
Accessories: Case Logic SLRC-206 Backpack, Canon Speedlite 430EX III-RT, Canon RC-6 Wireless Remote, Davis & Sanford TR653C-V9 Carbon Fiber Tripod, Aputure Amaran HR672 LED Light Kit, Kamerar DF-1M Softboxes

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SailingAway
Senior Member
295 posts
Joined Sep 2013
Post has been last edited 23 days ago by SailingAway. 2 edits done in total.
Jan 28, 2018 22:39 as a reply to kcrossley's post |  #4

Covering two people with only three smaller lights like this, you have a couple options:

1) Set your lighting for the interviewee. Go through the interview. Let them go, and reset lighting to shoot the interviewer's questions. Have the interviewer nod, act surprised, happy, sad, whatever reaction the interview content calls for. This is an old television news field reporter's trick, mostly used when only one camera is available, but it can apply to limited lighting resources too.

-or-

2) Get a fourth light. This could be a rental / loan, or, perhaps something cheap, or, a 4th amaran.

-or-

2a) Set this up where there's another lighting source. Your amarans have adjustable color temp, right? That helps...

IMHO you can't light two people with three lights, unless one of them is big (like a kino 4' fixture). But, this is a situation where your mileage may vary, because only you can decide what lighting setup produces the results you want to see. How good is good enough?


From the upper left corner of the U.S.
Photos, Video & Pano r us.
College and workshop instructor in video and audio.
70D, Sigma 8mm, Tokina f2.8 11-16, Canon EF-S f2.8 17-55, Sigma f2.8 50-150 EX OS, Tamron 150-600VC. Gigapan Epic Pro, Nodal Ninja 5 & R10.

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kcrossley
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
250 posts
Joined Feb 2009
Williamsburg, VA
Post has been edited 21 days ago by kcrossley.
Jan 30, 2018 17:20 as a reply to SailingAway's post |  #5

Actually, no. All three Amarans are daylight. I was told to buy them for maximum brightness, as the color adjustable ones are about half the brightness of the daylight version. I plan on using the 70D's white balance to adjust the color, which works much better than I ever expected. Two of the Amarans are wide angle with 2,080 LUX at 1 meter, and one is a spot with 6,040 LUX at 1 meter. They seem very bright. In fact, I'll likely add a softbox to each, which will help increase the light intensity and soften the shadows. This will also be shot in a model home during the day, so there will be some ambient daylight.

I was thinking of using both wide angles as key lights for each subject, but I'm not sure what to do with the spot light. It would make a great backlight, but then that leaves me without a fill light. And yes, I agree that I could really use a fourth light for this setup, but I won't be able to get that in time for the shoot. I do have a few CFLs I could use for the backlighting.

What do you recommend?


Cameras/Lenses: Canon 80D, Canon 70D, Canon 18-55mm, 50mm, 10-18mm, and 55-250mm Lenses
Accessories: Case Logic SLRC-206 Backpack, Canon Speedlite 430EX III-RT, Canon RC-6 Wireless Remote, Davis & Sanford TR653C-V9 Carbon Fiber Tripod, Aputure Amaran HR672 LED Light Kit, Kamerar DF-1M Softboxes

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SailingAway
Senior Member
295 posts
Joined Sep 2013
Jan 30, 2018 18:54 |  #6

With daylight-only fixtures you'd need to have any additional lights be daylight balanced. Or, if warmer, use additional lights as backlights, or background, or some use that doesn't produce mixed temperatures on people's faces.

I recommend #1, above, if possible. It's really quite flexible, if a little more involved in shooting and editing. You also get a 2-camera shoot with only one camera, in addition to maximizing the use of your available lighting gear.


From the upper left corner of the U.S.
Photos, Video & Pano r us.
College and workshop instructor in video and audio.
70D, Sigma 8mm, Tokina f2.8 11-16, Canon EF-S f2.8 17-55, Sigma f2.8 50-150 EX OS, Tamron 150-600VC. Gigapan Epic Pro, Nodal Ninja 5 & R10.

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Lighting a 2-Person Interview?
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