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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses
Thread started 29 Jan 2018 (Monday) 18:10
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70-200mm lens for portrait work

 
chuckmiller
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Jan 29, 2018 18:10 |  #1

This lens is a very popular choice. But the question is> if you are in a studio and you can position your camera and model at any distance you want, what focal length would you choose and why?




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s1a1om
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Jan 29, 2018 18:12 |  #2

How big is the studio? Many are limited on space and longer focal lengths may not be reasonable. That being said, I'd probably go with an 85L.


Constructive criticism is always appreciated.

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Pekka
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Post has been edited 24 days ago by Pekka.
Jan 29, 2018 18:56 |  #3

chuckmiller wrote in post #18552008 (external link)
This lens is a very popular choice. But the question is> if you are in a studio and you can position your camera and model at any distance you want, what focal length would you choose and why?

Distance changes perspective. Too close makes people "nosey, wide", too far "flat". So to get your desired perspective you'll need to move back or forth. This is why 85L is a popular choice with 1.3X crop, the distance to subject is good with "normal" framing. With full frame 135L might be better. Of course it all depends also on look you are after, but usually 50-200 is the range for most portraits. For environmental portraits wide angles like 20-35 may do well provided that you take care not to bend people with strong perspective.

Both in http://photography-on-the.net .../showthread.php?t=1​409168 are uncropped 85/1.2L II, I like that lens a LOT.


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Wilt
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Post has been last edited 24 days ago by Wilt. 3 edits done in total.
Jan 29, 2018 19:07 |  #4

Classically in the film days, portraiture employed (FF format) FL that permitted

  • full length standing at 50mm
  • waist-up portrait at 85mm
  • head & shoulders portrait and 100mm
  • tight headshots at 150-180mm


all done with the typical shooting distance of 8-10' for best facial presentation. Objections have been voiced by mothers when they see a photo of their son/daughter from from too far or too close, as the facial perspective is not what they are accustomed to seeing every day!
8-10' also fits well into overall studio dimensions, after you allow additional studio length to store/set backdrops and then independently lighting the backdrops, one rapidly finds they need 20-25' of space in one direction, which makes for fewer affordable studio locations.

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chuckmiller
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Jan 29, 2018 19:29 |  #5

s1a1om wrote in post #18552010 (external link)
How big is the studio? Many are limited on space and longer focal lengths may not be reasonable. That being said, I'd probably go with an 85L.

The question is with a 70-200 what focal length would you choose and why?




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chuckmiller
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Jan 29, 2018 19:38 |  #6

Wilt wrote in post #18552039 (external link)
Classically in the film days, portraiture employed (FF format) FL that permitted

  • full length standing at 50mm
  • waist-up portrait at 85mm
  • head & shoulders portrait and 100mm
  • tight headshots at 150-180mm


all done with the typical shooting distance of 8-10' for best facial presentation.

8-10 feet distance to subject and then adjust focal length to the desired framing. I see.




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umphotography
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Jan 30, 2018 08:44 |  #7

I sold my 70-200 F/2.8

Fast primes such as an 85 mm and 135mm are far better choices for portrait work and they weigh a heck of a lot less.


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Wilt
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Post has been edited 23 days ago by Wilt.
Jan 30, 2018 09:56 |  #8

umphotography wrote in post #18552313 (external link)
I sold my 70-200 F/2.8

Fast primes such as an 85 mm and 135mm are far better choices for portrait work and they weigh a heck of a lot less.

^
From the viewpoint of a portraiture subject (who is not accustomed to being the subject of photography as fashion model), I would be much less initially 'intimidated' with a smaller fixed FL lens on the camera than by the 70-200mm zoom's length, plus the diameter of the f/2.8


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DesolateMirror
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Jan 30, 2018 10:17 |  #9

It depends on what your intended outcome is. People (faces) tend to look 'better' at longer focal lengths.

Go to google images and search "focal length portrait comparison".




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Wilt
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Post has been edited 23 days ago by Wilt.
Jan 30, 2018 11:58 |  #10

DesolateMirror wrote in post #18552369 (external link)
It depends on what your intended outcome is. People (faces) tend to look 'better' at longer focal lengths.

Go to google images and search "focal length portrait comparison".

http://stepheneastwood​.com .../lensdistortion/ind​ex.htm (external link)

But I do NOT like her photo taken with 230m or 350mm more than I like her photo taken with 100mm or 135mm!


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cristphoto
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Feb 01, 2018 08:35 |  #11

Most of the time I use the 85 for singles and couples. For three or four people I will go with the 50.


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tcphoto1
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Feb 05, 2018 15:33 |  #12

I too sold the 70-200/2.8, it’s simply to heavy and slow compared to the 85L, 100LIS and 200/2.8II that I own. I like the brighter viewfinder and extra stops available if needed.


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ben805
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Feb 05, 2018 16:20 |  #13

For studio setting, 24-105 on FF is my go to lens, and use mostly between f/5.6~f/8.


5D Mark III, Samyang 14mm, 35LII, 85L II, 100L IS Macro, 24-105L, 70-200L 2.8 IS II. 580EX, AB400, AB800.

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Cham_001
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Feb 05, 2018 16:26 |  #14

Wilt wrote in post #18552039 (external link)
Classically in the film days, portraiture employed (FF format) FL that permitted

  • full length standing at 50mm
  • waist-up portrait at 85mm
  • head & shoulders portrait and 100mm
  • tight headshots at 150-180mm


all done with the typical shooting distance of 8-10' for best facial presentation. Objections have been voiced by mothers when they see a photo of their son/daughter from from too far or too close, as the facial perspective is not what they are accustomed to seeing every day!
8-10' also fits well into overall studio dimensions, after you allow additional studio length to store/set backdrops and then independently lighting the backdrops, one rapidly finds they need 20-25' of space in one direction, which makes for fewer affordable studio locations.

---
just 1 amendment ... would add-in the 135L for head & shoulders
(this is truly an incredible lens to use, you get astounding results most of the time)


"... with a clear perspective - the confusion is clearer ..."
Body: Canon 5D-IV
Lenses: 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM, 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM
Flashguns: 580ex II x 4, MT24 macro flash
Accessories: Pkt Wiz TT5 x 4, AC3, MiniTT1, Sekonic L-758DR
Studio Lights: <... pending ...>

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Wilt
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Feb 05, 2018 18:07 |  #15

Cham_001 wrote in post #18557106 (external link)
---
just 1 amendment ... would add-in the 135L for head & shoulders
(this is truly an incredible lens to use, you get astounding results most of the time)

I called 150-180mm the ideal FL for headshots, because they are a bit 'better' in the opinion of many

  • the 135mm at 7' captures 1.3' x 1.9'
  • the 150mm at 8' captures 1.3' x 1'9' area
  • the 180mm at 9' captures 1.2' x 1.8'


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70-200mm lens for portrait work
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