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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 05 Feb 2018 (Monday) 20:01
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Online Scams (Be Careful)

 
Pagman
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Feb 05, 2018 20:01 |  #1

Today after selling my nikon gear I saw and went after some gear in an online store that has four letters in its name, anyway after choosing and paying by paypal, this evening we were settled and use an old phone that was not registered anywhere and not on any contract (just use it for a radio) anyway there was about 6 Txt messages on the phone supposed from Paypal giving the item price and seller but asking me to reply with a yes or no as it said it looked like susspitious activity.
The thing is the transactions through paypal were fully legit from propper shops selling in this online site, so all as far as we were concerned was fine.

How could this person/organisation trace our old phone that was not registered anywhere certainly not with paypal, and also see the details of my transactions.

Thankfully I did nothing - did Not reply to the text messages, but went into paypal and removed the link to my bank so as to stop any other financial links.

How could this happen.

P.


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Dan ­ Marchant
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Feb 05, 2018 22:53 |  #2

Pagman wrote in post #18557284 (external link)
How could this person/organisation trace our old phone that was not registered anywhere certainly not with paypal, and also see the details of my transactions.

They couldn't, and didn't. It would be impossible and as Sherlock would say "once you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth".

there are various possibilities...
1. The phone was previously registered and is still in the system or on the suppliers records.
2. Scammers previously had the number and these messages were just random scam messages that coincided with you placing orders.
3. They were actually legitimate messages which you mistook for scam/spam.


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Pagman
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Feb 05, 2018 23:06 |  #3

Dan Marchant wrote in post #18557368 (external link)
They couldn't, and didn't. It would be impossible and as Sherlock would say "once you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth".

there are various possibilities...
1. The phone was previously registered and is still in the system or on the suppliers records.
2. Scammers previously had the number and these messages were just random scam messages that coincided with you placing orders.
3. They were actually legitimate messages which you mistook for scam/spam.


I hope the latter is correct but -

Paypal never had the number.
And the number when searched online was showing as a scam for many different people over last year and into this year.

Th ephone was purchased with the sim as a paya as you go, but needed registering with the phone company, but appart from that it was given to no one.

P.


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joeseph
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Feb 06, 2018 00:28 |  #4

It isn't just online or via phone - Monday I got a letter (remember them?) from a supposed law firm trying to put me in touch with some inheritance.
Just simply give them all my identification details in the world and they would be happy to act on my behalf.
I may be daft, but I didn't come down in the last shower.


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john ­ crossley
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Feb 06, 2018 00:58 |  #5

Pagman wrote in post #18557284 (external link)
Today after selling my nikon gear I saw and went after some gear in an online store that has four letters in its name, anyway after choosing and paying by paypal, this evening we were settled and use an old phone that was not registered anywhere and not on any contract (just use it for a radio) anyway there was about 6 Txt messages on the phone supposed from Paypal giving the item price and seller but asking me to reply with a yes or no as it said it looked like susspitious activity.
The thing is the transactions through paypal were fully legit from propper shops selling in this online site, so all as far as we were concerned was fine.

How could this person/organisation trace our old phone that was not registered anywhere certainly not with paypal, and also see the details of my transactions.

Thankfully I did nothing - did Not reply to the text messages, but went into paypal and removed the link to my bank so as to stop any other financial links.

How could this happen.

P.

You could contact Paypal and ask them if the texts are genuine.


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moose10101
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Feb 06, 2018 06:34 |  #6

Pagman wrote in post #18557373 (external link)
Dan Marchant wrote in post #18557368 (external link)
They couldn't, and didn't. It would be impossible and as Sherlock would say "once you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth".

there are various possibilities...
1. The phone was previously registered and is still in the system or on the suppliers records.
2. Scammers previously had the number and these messages were just random scam messages that coincided with you placing orders.
3. They were actually legitimate messages which you mistook for scam/spam.


I hope the latter is correct but -

Paypal never had the number.
And the number when searched online was showing as a scam for many different people over last year and into this year.

Th ephone was purchased with the sim as a paya as you go, but needed registering with the phone company, but appart from that it was given to no one.

P.

So you want us to believe that, immediately after you made purchases, you got scam text messages to a phone that had never been registered anywhere, showing the exact amount and seller name from your purchases? Yeah, OK.

As John suggested, call PayPal. But before you do, log in on PayPal and check your profile info.




  
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Pagman
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Feb 06, 2018 06:51 |  #7

moose10101 wrote in post #18557539 (external link)
So you want us to believe that, immediately after you made purchases, you got scam text messages to a phone that had never been registered anywhere, showing the exact amount and seller name from your purchases? Yeah, OK.

As John suggested, call PayPal. But before you do, log in on PayPal and check your profile info.


No lie and it was worrying when I searched the number shown in the text and it was linked to a widespread scam.

P.


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Lumens
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Feb 06, 2018 06:52 |  #8

You can't be too careful. My ID was taken in the Experian hack. I have had 6 fraudulent activities on my ID just this year. Be sure keep an eye on what is happening on the Credit Agencies. If any a company simply checks your credit status you need to know why. If you don't know, then contact the company doing the check and find out why? I stopped three fraudulent credit card applications that way.


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birderman
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Feb 06, 2018 09:35 |  #9

Did you receive the goods you paid for ? or are you suggesting the seller is the scammer ?

Do you use your PP account often, was this a large amount - possible that PP genuine as activity is not normal - if the message was sent by SMS it is probably automated if not responded to within set time the message gets repeated.

Have you checked to your Paypal account online to check for any outstanding actions ?

The phone number must be recorded somewhere is it within your profile for the auction site ? May be you used once and forgot, once the number has been on the internet it will be very difficult for it to be removed 100%.

The weird bit is the the scammer if they are, has your old phone number and has details of your recent transaction - this is quite unusual, these scammers usually send random transaction details as they already have your name/email address and contact number which they can use ....

The SMS only asked you to reply yes ? so cannot see what additional info a scammer would get that they haven't already, normally scammers provide a link to a fake site that gets you to enter account info that they can then use to use your account for fraud or the link will automatically load malware or virus onto your system.

Is it possible the sellers account has been compromised and the details of the transaction been intercepted by a third party that has used the info to scam you ?


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Choderboy
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Feb 06, 2018 10:10 |  #10

"not registered anywhere and not on any contract (just use it for a radio)"

What do you mean by "not registered".
Regarding "Not on any contract", if a mobile phone receives an SMS it is, using correct technical language, registered on a network.


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Pagman
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Feb 06, 2018 10:23 |  #11

What was puzzling paypal had already precessed the orders and they had been paid (all good in that department) we had the email payement confirmations from both the seller and paypal, only several hours later did we recieve the txt messages asking us if we wanted to go a head with the purchase or not requiring an A or B reply, paypal had already completed the payment process well before these text messages.

I recieved one of the items this morning and a tracking confirmation about the other, No problem with the transactions or the sellers, but somthing deffinatly fishey with the txt messages, I left paypal an email on thier site but still awaiting a reply.

P.


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Pagman
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Feb 06, 2018 10:30 |  #12

Choderboy wrote in post #18557650 (external link)
"not registered anywhere and not on any contract (just use it for a radio)"

What do you mean by "not registered".
Regarding "Not on any contract", if a mobile phone receives an SMS it is, using correct technical language, registered on a network.


Its a spare phone we purchased with the sim on a payg set up, it has only been registered with the phone company but never topped up, as we use another for our main comms, paypal have our main number not the one the txt messages came through on.
Th eother strange thing is - the same day I registerd the spare phone with the phone company, I got a couple of cold calling messages - you know the sorts "you have been involved in an accident our insurance can help".

P.


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Tom ­ Reichner
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Feb 06, 2018 10:57 |  #13

Pagman wrote in post #18557663 (external link)
Its a spare phone we purchased with the sim on a payg set up,

What is a "payg set up"? . I have never heard that term before and I am curious to know what it is.

.

Pagman wrote in post #18557663 (external link)
it has only been registered with the phone company but never topped up, as we use another for our main comms . . .

What do you mean by "topped up"? . That is another term I have never heard before.

.

Pagman wrote in post #18557663 (external link)
The other strange thing is - the same day I registerd the spare phone with the phone company . . .

I also don't know what you mean by "registered with the phone company". . Do you mean that you had the phone activated, and given an active phone number? Is that what you mean when you say "registered"?

I have the idea that you may be from a country that is foreign to me, like maybe England or Scotland or somewhere like that. . The way you write, and the terms you use, they seem to be very different than anything I am accustomed to. . Despite the fact that you write in English, it is difficult for me to understand your posts. . I am interested in what is going on with the fraud attempts that you are facing; that is why I ask so many questions and seek clarification, because I want to better understand what is going on with your situation.

The way you write, it reminds me of something I am familiar with - this series of movies, Midsomer Murders. . The characters on that show have the same kind of talking that you do - that is why I thought that maybe you are in England, because that show is based in England and the actors and actresses are English.

I will stop my digression now.


.


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "moot point", NOT "mute point".

  
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Pagman
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Feb 06, 2018 11:31 |  #14

Tom Reichner wrote in post #18557679 (external link)
What is a "payg set up"? . I have never heard that term before and I am curious to know what it is.

.

What do you mean by "topped up"? . That is another term I have never heard before.

.

I also don't know what you mean by "registered with the phone company". . Do you mean that you had the phone activated, and given an active phone number? Is that what you mean when you say "registered"?

I have the idea that you may be from a country that is foreign to me, like maybe England or Scotland or somewhere like that. . The way you write, and the terms you use, they seem to be very different than anything I am accustomed to. . Despite the fact that you write in English, it is difficult for me to understand your posts. . I am interested in what is going on with the fraud attempts that you are facing; that is why I ask so many questions and seek clarification, because I want to better understand what is going on with your situation.

The way you write, it reminds me of something I am familiar with - this series of movies, Midsomer Murders. . The characters on that show have the same kind of talking that you do - that is why I thought that maybe you are in England, because that show is based in England and the actors and actresses are English.

I will stop my digression now.

.


Hi tom, yes I am from England Uk how ever you want to put it, its still English language.

Over here you can buy a cell/mobile phone that is not connected to a monthy bill/contract they are called Pay as you Go (P.A.Y.G), basically you buy the phone with a sim card included, then you ring the number of your phone of the call time provider be it Orange, O2, Vodaphone etc, to regiter your phone on thier network.
On the Pay as you Go set up you are able to get top ups for your phone as often and as much as you want, this is what I did with that particular phone, minus topping it up with call time credit.

I have another phone but by a different call time company, this phone is my main phone and used for all communication, paypal have this main number but not the other one, after I went into my paypal account and saw no unusual acitivity, I still left them an email explaining what had happened, at the same time I dissconnected my bank account from paypal, and recieved a reference number from paypal but to my corect phone that I set up with paypal.

In other words paypal do not have my other number that the scam text messages came through on.

P.


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Colin ­ Glover
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Feb 06, 2018 11:42 |  #15

PAYG= Pay As You Go, i.e. there's no contract. You need to put credit (£, $, € etc) on to the sim. This is called Topping Up in the UK. You are usually charged per minute, and for each text message (SMS) you send and you keep it in credit until it is used. Some PAYG Sims give you a set amount of minutes and data/txt but those usually expire 30 days from when you top up.


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