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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Wildlife 
Thread started 03 Mar 2018 (Saturday) 11:12
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European brown hare:Lepus europeas UK

 
Snydremark
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May 14, 2018 13:55 |  #16

You've got some positively wonderful shots there, Stu! Keep it up and keep sharing; love to see 'em :)

In particular, the shots where you got great portrait framings are gorgeous (#3 in the op and #2 in your first followup). I also LOVE that last shot from down low, looking like IT is stalking YOU 8)

Our local cottontails are great because they're an easy "practice" subject since they're so prevalent. They're just fun to snap pics of throughout the year.


- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII/5D IV, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS I/II)
"The easiest way to improve your photos is to adjust the loose nut between the shutter release and the ground."

  
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Sounds
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May 16, 2018 12:55 |  #17

Snydremark wrote in post #18625616 (external link)
You've got some positively wonderful shots there, Stu! Keep it up and keep sharing; love to see 'em :)

In particular, the shots where you got great portrait framings are gorgeous (#3 in the op and #2 in your first followup). I also LOVE that last shot from down low, looking like IT is stalking YOU 8)

Our local cottontails are great because they're an easy "practice" subject since they're so prevalent. They're just fun to snap pics of throughout the year.

Buddy would you tell me your first name please:-),I feel we all share the same love,so always want to talk to folks on a personal level.:-)

Thank you for the extremely kind words.......I'm working on it bro.....they will keep coming I'm just severely time pressed. Factor in my processing skills are frankly on a huge learning curve,I'm aquiring frames far far faster than I can process or share sadly it's more than a little frustrating,but needs must.

Buddy I love the portrait orientation, I've some insane obsession with hares coming down the barrel in portrait, i've posted one here recently,I'm so tired I can't remember where DO ii thread??

With close hares I struggle with as the flipping of the camera,it almost becomes a dance. I love it adore how it pushes me forwards,but struggle a bit with my framing. It's really hard when I don't measure up and really like what could have been,but I also cherish that side of learning anything. They change shape so so fast if one is very close,which demands that dance and FP's being moved at equal pace.

Yup our Rabbit is a much easier target, as well,that said I don't make images of them that often. I suppose my obsession with hares is helping level that balance,certainly i would think most image makers here would say a hare is trickier,but for me now maybe that isn't the case.

One learns so so much from choosing to really try and go at one subject for an extended period of time,not only the quest for a better image,but also the why's and hows of getting close,field craft I suppose.

I've learned so so much from these hares,I'll forever be in their dept as a wanna be image maker, mate i'm going to try and share that in an image...........

I don't really consider this to be mine ,it was a gift from a special little hare. ,that we got to watch grow up for a while, The one I refer to as Taz

central framing shouldn't really work.....me as an image maker didn't see this frame,didn't visualise on conceptualise.I thought she was leaving,i tracked saw the eye clear took a couple of shots as one does and this was given back to me

I take little credit honestly for me it's her image.

Ya know when one get's home,there are those few frames where one hopes,"I might have done ok",it's real hope at times I have a lot to learn i know it,no delusions!!!! I didn't even think about this frame then.I'd I scrambled to look at all those shots,I took of Taz being copied whilst grooming,by a smaller younger nervous leveret. It was a seriously special evening,man I got lucky,fairy dust all ways. I had me cake cream everything I could wish for Yet when I went through the images on the PC this frame sort of hit me ,a complete bolt from the blue I really didn't know I had.

I still don't really know why. I have no idea if this is good bad or indifferent ,but I sort of love it

I pressed a shutter, nowt more after having a good while with my little mate, while taking the frame I remember sadly smiling that she was leaving.

But she turned and came back and I ended up spending an hour with two young hares in stunning golden red light...... the type of experience we all dream about

But, where in the world did this come from I'll never know and that's why I don''t feel it is really mine.
Sorry for the long waffle,it's fun sharing what went on behind an image

I'd love to know your first name...... cheers again for the lovely words and the time taken here's something slightly different

IMAGE: https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4763/39818302011_b48d36fcd8_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/23EB​cWt  (external link) _70F7078 (external link) by Stuart Philpott (external link), on Flickr

take care

stu



  
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Snydremark
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May 16, 2018 13:12 |  #18

Sounds wrote in post #18626807 (external link)
Buddy would you tell me your first name please:-),I feel we all share the same love,so always want to talk to folks on a personal level.:-)

Thank you for the extremely kind words.......I'm working on it bro.....they will keep coming I'm just severely time pressed. Factor in my processing skills are frankly on a huge learning curve,I'm aquiring frames far far faster than I can process or share sadly it's more than a little frustrating,but needs must.

Buddy I love the portrait orientation, I've some insane obsession with hares coming down the barrel in portrait, i've posted one here recently,I'm so tired I can't remember where DO ii thread??

With close hares I struggle with as the flipping of the camera,it almost becomes a dance. I love it adore how it pushes me forwards,but struggle a bit with my framing. It's really hard when I don't measure up and really like what could have been,but I also cherish that side of learning anything. They change shape so so fast if one is very close,which demands that dance and FP's being moved at equal pace.

Yup our Rabbit is a much easier target, as well,that said I don't make images of them that often. I suppose my obsession with hares is helping level that balance,certainly i would think most image makers here would say a hare is trickier,but for me now maybe that isn't the case.

One learns so so much from choosing to really try and go at one subject for an extended period of time,not only the quest for a better image,but also the why's and hows of getting close,field craft I suppose.

I've learned so so much from these hares,I'll forever be in their dept as a wanna be image maker, mate i'm going to try and share that in an image...........

I don't really consider this to be mine ,it was a gift from a special little hare. ,that we got to watch grow up for a while, The one I refer to as Taz

central framing shouldn't really work.....me as an image maker didn't see this frame,didn't visualise on conceptualise.I thought she was leaving,i tracked saw the eye clear took a couple of shots as one does and this was given back to me

I take little credit honestly for me it's her image.

Ya know when one get's home,there are those few frames where one hopes,"I might have done ok",it's real hope at times I have a lot to learn i know it,no delusions!!!! I didn't even think about this frame then.I'd I scrambled to look at all those shots,I took of Taz being copied whilst grooming,by a smaller younger nervous leveret. It was a seriously special evening,man I got lucky,fairy dust all ways. I had me cake cream everything I could wish for Yet when I went through the images on the PC this frame sort of hit me ,a complete bolt from the blue I really didn't know I had.

I still don't really know why. I have no idea if this is good bad or indifferent ,but I sort of love it

I pressed a shutter, nowt more after having a good while with my little mate, while taking the frame I remember sadly smiling that she was leaving.

But she turned and came back and I ended up spending an hour with two young hares in stunning golden red light...... the type of experience we all dream about

But, where in the world did this come from I'll never know and that's why I don''t feel it is really mine.
Sorry for the long waffle,it's fun sharing what went on behind an image

I'd love to know your first name...... cheers again for the lovely words and the time taken here's something slightly different


take care

stu

That's great, Stu! My name is Eric; pleased to meet ya :) The ones I tend to enjoy the most are the shoots where I'm interacting with a "regular" or set of regulars. Since the little hoppers are on discussion, a few of my personal faves over the years would be:

This snowshoe that I encounterd in a ditch, just outside of Seward, AK:

IMAGE: https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5120/7182358021_a25cf577a1_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/bWFs​NZ  (external link) Snow-shoe Hare-9294-2 (external link) by Eric (external link), on Flickr

This parent/child pair I had about 30min with, on lunch, outside my last job:
1.

IMAGE: https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7316/27651642460_84d463cf3e_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/J8tT​Wd  (external link) Cottontail-6247 (external link) by Eric (external link), on Flickr

2.
IMAGE: https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7291/26907141473_3ef682188d_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/GZG8​Ji  (external link) mini Cottontail-5291 (external link) by Eric (external link), on Flickr

And this little floof that I ran into in the backyard a couple of years ago:

IMAGE: https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5160/5887009410_dcfdde9799_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/9Yds​Nf  (external link) cotton-8008 (external link) by Eric (external link), on Flickr

I spend a fair about of time with as many of the furred/feathered neighbors we have in our region as I can find. The one I truly miss is a particular Great Blue Heron that used to hang out at a local pond, who got so used to seeing me around that I could frame him up with my 24-105 on a good day.

- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII/5D IV, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS I/II)
"The easiest way to improve your photos is to adjust the loose nut between the shutter release and the ground."

  
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May 16, 2018 15:06 |  #19

hey Eric:-), mate thanks for chiming in with the images,I adore ,sorry we adore the snow shoe and the others are cool Wabbiit faces are so much more expressive than one first sees,mum is wonderful Eric really is and kids are kids ...too cute. That first though ,is lovely it's the light through the ears mate,fabulous.
cheers for the images,it's cool to have others hares here as well THANKYOU

Eric do you guys see hares using scent trails markers,that kind of thing?? I've not seen quite like this in our rabbit. Maybe just not spotted. but our brown hare is using scent trails tracking each other,i'm deeply curious as to what you guys see,as well as the wonderful images being contributed

I'm pretty sure they are leaving a scent mark fairly high up by using something under their chin. ?????


there are always special ones mate,it's hard when they aren't there any more-?!!

stu




  
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Snydremark
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May 16, 2018 16:00 |  #20

Sounds wrote in post #18626878 (external link)
hey Eric:-), mate thanks for chiming in with the images,I adore ,sorry we adore the snow shoe and the others are cool Wabbiit faces are so much more expressive than one first sees,mum is wonderful Eric really is and kids are kids ...too cute. That first though ,is lovely it's the light through the ears mate,fabulous.
cheers for the images,it's cool to have others hares here as well THANKYOU

Eric do you guys see hares using scent trails markers,that kind of thing?? I've not seen quite like this in our rabbit. Maybe just not spotted. but our brown hare is using scent trails tracking each other,i'm deeply curious as to what you guys see,as well as the wonderful images being contributed

I'm pretty sure they are leaving a scent mark fairly high up by using something under their chin. ?????


there are always special ones mate,it's hard when they aren't there any more-?!!

stu

Ha!; too true. You want expressive? How about the little guy giving me "the look" for interrupting lunch? :D

IMAGE: https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7296/26907142803_a147cc0d68_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/GZG9​8e  (external link) mini cottontail-5257 (external link) by Eric (external link), on Flickr

You know; I'm not certain. I think our jackrabbits mark territory and defend it fairly heavily, but as far as I know, the cottontails and snowshoes don't really. It would not be uncommon, though, for them to have some sort of scent gland around their chin/cheeks that they use to mark their presence. Even cats have those, it's at least partially what they're doing when they nuzzle people.

- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII/5D IV, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS I/II)
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May 17, 2018 11:35 |  #21

ha ha too cool ^^:-)

Yeah,I'm aware of what cats do and in part that reason,I've seen our Rabbit spray ,which again i presume is some from of territory marking. But this species of hare is defintely doing something different,actual marking places ,well at least that's what I think I'm seeing Eric,who knows,I'm not really well read on hares,all my musings are centered on what I actually in the field,but something is afoot that is for sure,I've seen this type of thing to many times


Eric this is from that same evening as my last post,this is the younger leveret I mentioned,the stick in front of her nose ,is a scent marker I believe and she is reacting to that. As you can see from this tiny snapshot of a couple of images,I got super lucky that night

IMAGE: https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4419/37129463845_bf8baf17a6_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/Yz1d​2K  (external link) _70F6832 (external link) by Stuart Philpott (external link), on Flickr

thanks again

stu



  
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Snydremark
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May 17, 2018 11:57 |  #22

Sounds wrote in post #18627294 (external link)
ha ha too cool ^^:-)

Yeah,I'm aware of what cats do and in part that reason,I've seen our Rabbit spray ,which again i presume is some from of territory marking. But this species of hare is defintely doing something different,actual marking places ,well at least that's what I think I'm seeing Eric,who knows,I'm not really well read on hares,all my musings are centered on what I actually in the field,but something is afoot that is for sure,I've seen this type of thing to many times


Eric this is from that same evening as my last post,this is the younger leveret I mentioned,the stick in front of her nose ,is a scent marker I believe and she is reacting to that. As you can see from this tiny snapshot of a couple of images,I got super lucky that night

...

thanks again

stu

Definitely some sort of alerted reaction going on there; I can't find anything on these particular Hares utilizing scent marking, all the literature seems to point to them making a point to *avoid* leaving scent trails whenever possible. Still; they *are* mammals, and they may still do so. It's also possible (even seems probable to me from that shot) that it's reacting to scent markings/trail from a local predator. Whatever is going on there, you got a great reaction shot.


- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII/5D IV, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS I/II)
"The easiest way to improve your photos is to adjust the loose nut between the shutter release and the ground."

  
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Tom ­ Reichner
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May 18, 2018 11:02 |  #23

Snydremark wrote in post #18625616 (external link)
Our local cottontails are great because they're an easy "practice" subject since they're so prevalent. They're just fun to snap pics of throughout the year.

Sounds wrote in post #18626807 (external link)
Yup our Rabbit is a much easier target, as well,that said I don't make images of them that often. I suppose my obsession with hares is helping level that balance,certainly i would think most image makers here would say a hare is trickier,but for me now maybe that isn't the case.

.
I have found the opposite to be true for me; hares such as the Snowshoe Hare and the larger Jackrabbits (which are actually hares, not rabbits) are significantly easier to photograph than the Cottontail Rabbits are.

Hares often allow me to approach to within shooting range, and then stay there for some time, while I am quite close.

Conversely, the rabbits are skittish creatures that tend to hide in the thick brush and seldom come out where one can see them. . Then, when they finally do come out into the open as soon as you start to approach them, they dash back into the thicket and you never see them again. . This is what happens 99% of the time with rabbits. . It is extremely rare for me to be able to get within photo range of a rabbit.

But the hares, about 20% of the time I see one it will allow me to approach to within close range and shoot it for a length of time. . This is based on a very wide sample size, and includes rabbit and hare populations from many different states and regions throughout the western United States. . No matter where I go, hares are pretty easy and rabbits are extremely difficult.


.


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "moot point", NOT "mute point".

  
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Snydremark
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May 18, 2018 11:21 |  #24

Tom Reichner wrote in post #18627890 (external link)
.
I have found the opposite to be true for me; hares such as the Snowshoe Hare and the larger Jackrabbits (which are actually hares, not rabbits) are significantly easier to photograph than the Cottontail Rabbits are.

Hares often allow me to approach to within shooting range, and then stay there for some time, while I am quite close.

Conversely, the rabbits are skittish creatures that tend to hide in the thick brush and seldom come out where one can see them. . Then, when they finally do come out into the open as soon as you start to approach them, they dash back into the thicket and you never see them again. . This is what happens 99% of the time with rabbits. . It is extremely rare for me to be able to get within photo range of a rabbit.

But the hares, about 20% of the time I see one it will allow me to approach to within close range and shoot it for a length of time. . This is based on a very wide sample size, and includes rabbit and hare populations from many different states and regions throughout the western United States. . No matter where I go, hares are pretty easy and rabbits are extremely difficult.

.

You gotta come hang out with the city rabbits then, Tom :D Rather than thickets, we have grass lawns and hedges that can give some nice backgrounds; and since they're in our neighborhoods, they're a bit more innured to auto/foot traffic. So, we can EASILY get with 400mm range of them; 70-200 if we're patient. Far as I'm concerned, it's the only way to get Cottontail shots...I can't imagine trying to approach these guys out in the field :p


- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII/5D IV, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS I/II)
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Tom ­ Reichner
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May 18, 2018 11:39 |  #25

Snydremark wrote in post #18627898 (external link)
You gotta come hang out with the city rabbits then, Tom :D Rather than thickets, we have grass lawns and hedges that can give some nice backgrounds; and since they're in our neighborhoods, they're a bit more innured to auto/foot traffic. So, we can EASILY get with 400mm range of them; 70-200 if we're patient. Far as I'm concerned, it's the only way to get Cottontail shots...I can't imagine trying to approach these guys out in the field :p

.
If there was a way to get those 'tame' Cottontails in natural looking habitats / vegetation, then that would be awesome! . Unfortunately, it just seems like it would be so tough to avoid getting lawn grass in the photos.

But perhaps it'd be possible to get those habituated lawn rabbits into adjoining natural areas with natural vegetation / native plant species?


.


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "moot point", NOT "mute point".

  
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Snydremark
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Likes: 1241
Joined Mar 2009
Location: Issaquah, WA USA
Post edited 5 days ago by Snydremark.
     
May 18, 2018 11:44 |  #26

Tom Reichner wrote in post #18627907 (external link)
.
If there was a way to get those 'tame' Cottontails in natural looking habitats / vegetation, then that would be awesome! . Unfortunately, it just seems like it would be so tough to avoid getting lawn grass in the photos.

But perhaps it'd be possible to get those habituated lawn rabbits into adjoining natural areas with natural vegetation / native plant species?

.

With a bit of hunting around for the backgrounds you're looking for, it's possible, even probable, I suspect. Assuming the bg vegitation you're wanting grows on the wet side of the hills...


- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII/5D IV, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS I/II)
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WoytekM
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May 18, 2018 13:35 |  #27

Tom, you're right, here's an example.


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Zgorzelec, Poland

  
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May 19, 2018 07:32 |  #28

Interesting debate . Tom I simply don't focus on our rabbit enough with a camera, for me they are a much easier target that I've never really had problems getting close to.. I guess getting a good hare image for the average guy here would be much harder than a rabbit,but it's very interesting hearing your thoughts, I understand completely what you are saying. Maybe I'm wrong, here!!

It's difficult for me to evaluate objectively ,because of the amount of time I spend actively seeking hare images , I simply don't chase the rabbit to the same level. But I've always felt I could get close to a rabbit without too much trouble.


Tom wilderness,wild places aren't here to the extent you guys have. Part of this might be that the hares tend to be found in less populated areas . I tend to shy away from people with my photography. when I do come into contact with others making images(bar some notible exceptions) I don't always enjoy the experience. I'd probably struggle with joining Eric and that's no offence to Eric what so ever,I don't much care for cities. I suppose I'm driven to try and learn how to make images of the most wild subjects we have. I'm not really drawn to our deer parks where the deer are used to people either. I'd rather be barely getting an image and know it was wild than visit such places,I occassionally do for a bit of hard core practice,but the images don't mean the same to me.

There are two base skills for me in this wildlife image making lark :one is using the camera,the second the fieldcraft side. If I am not very good at both I don't think I'll ever be able to call myself a "real wildlife photographer". I'm utterly sure this ethos whiich is mine and very personal is not the best way to learn all this. But it is how I am, I am absolutely non judgemental on how anyone else does all this, each to their own and all the luck in the world with their endevor:-). I want to shoot wild animals , that won't tolerate mistakes of mine fieldcraft wise

For me, I need to be able to find, get close to, what ever wild subject I am after. Then have the camera skills to craft a cool image. The former is incredibly important for me. I suppose I'm trying to build a skillset that will set me up,give me a base to approach other forms of wildlife,if we ever get chance to travel. If not then slowly i'll find all the species around me and go for them. I am desparate to earn that two fold skillset though and I think that is why I don't make so many rabbit images,for me at least they don't represent the same challenge

Maybe i'm just completely nuts and have to suffer for me art who knows cheers for chiming in all

stu




  
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May 20, 2018 10:35 |  #29

Here's a recent one taken with the 400DO is ii 1/1000 f5.6 iso 5000


IMAGE: https://farm1.staticflickr.com/827/42233381911_6edc35f946_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/27m2​846  (external link) _70F7737 level this sm (external link) by Stuart Philpott (external link), on Flickr


cheers

stu



  
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Tom ­ Reichner
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Post edited 3 days ago by Tom Reichner.
     
May 20, 2018 12:28 |  #30

Sounds wrote in post #18628999 (external link)
Here's a recent one taken with the 400DO is ii 1/1000 f5.6 iso 5000


QUOTED IMAGE
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/27m2​846  (external link)

.
Of all the Hare photos you have posted, this is the best one, in my opinion.

I love the clean composition, with no distracting, incongruous elements. . Clean foreground. . Clean background. . And a clean view of the Hare with no stray vegetation blocking part of him. . And that wee bit of sky in the upper right corner - gotta love that because it gives a more developed 'sense of place' to the image.

Excellent!


.


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "moot point", NOT "mute point".

  
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European brown hare:Lepus europeas UK
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