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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 22 Apr 2018 (Sunday) 13:57
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Ltdave
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Apr 22, 2018 13:57 |  #1

so, i tried shooting some video with my 5D3 last night...

darkened hockey arena with spot light on anthem singer...

it was kind of last minute and ive not used my dslr for video before...

i tried really quickly before starting to adjust the aperture (it looks like it defaulted to 12,800 ISO) because the spotlight was so strong, the singers' faces are washed out...

do the shutter speed and aperture operate similarly to a dlsr, when shooting video?




  
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mathogre
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Apr 22, 2018 19:25 |  #2

Ltdave wrote in post #18611477 (external link)
so, i tried shooting some video with my 5D3 last night...

darkened hockey arena with spot light on anthem singer...

it was kind of last minute and ive not used my dslr for video before...

i tried really quickly before starting to adjust the aperture (it looks like it defaulted to 12,800 ISO) because the spotlight was so strong, the singers' faces are washed out...

do the shutter speed and aperture operate similarly to a dlsr, when shooting video?

Video with the 5D3 isn't intuitive. There are many video settings on the 5D3. When I've done stage recordings using the 5D3, my settings start with image size, frame rate, and compression set to 1920, 30, and All-I, respectively. ISO is set to auto. Shooting mode is P. I enable "Silent Control" to allow me to control exposure during video recording, as well as sound if I'm manually controlling that. I used to do photography and videography for our high school band. Regarding shutter speed and aperture, yes they operate similarly for video. It's still "motion pictures", but you're locked into video frame rates that are standard. For instance, you could shoot a video with a shutter speed of 1/1000s and a corresponding aperture and ISO. Your video will be jumpy however as you're likely shooting at a frame rate of 30 fps.

There are annoyances with the 5D3, but it *can* make a decent video. Google what you can on "5d mark iii video". I recall that's what I did, and it was a very good starting point. Also, your manual can help identify the settings you can adjust. Experiment.

Good luck! Hope this helps.


Graham
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J ­ Michael
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Apr 23, 2018 05:52 |  #3

With video you usually choose a shutter speed about 1/(2*frame rate) so for 24 fps use 1/50 or 1/60. Then control exposure with your aperture. Sometimes you cannot or do not want to stop down far enough, so either lower the ISO or use an ND filter to bring exposure down to a suitable level. Dedicated video cameras usually have built-in ND but for DSLRs you have to add your own.




  
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BigAl007
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Apr 27, 2018 20:19 |  #4

In the specific circumstance of a spotlighted singer on a darkened stage then this I would think would be just about the perfect time to be using spot metering. Any sort of metering that is averaging the whole scene is almost certain to overexpose in such extreme lighting conditions. Using evaluative in this case the camera is still going to try to expose for the darker background to some extent, while not totally losing the highlights. The problem is that the camera doesn't really know if it is looking at a dark subject, with a bright highlight in the center of it. Or if it is looking at a bright subject, on a dark background, either situation will produce the same result as far as the metering system is concerned. This would be true for still images, as well as for moving ones, so in this case it's not really a function of using the camera for video causing this issue, but a general photography one.

Of course the issue of appropriate shutter speeds and apertures for video work still apply, where 1/2×fps is the normally accepted shutter speed for natural looking video playback, going longer with the shutter speed is difficult as you need some time for processing the data off the sensor between each frame. Well at least once the frame rate has reached around 24 fps. Below that motion will look choppy whatever you do. With cine film the shutter is usually mechanically coupled to the film transport mechanism. Since the film is generally pulled through the gate, then stopped while the exposure is made, before being moved again for the next shot. The shutter either being a simple rotating disk with a 180° aperture in it, or a spinning prism in higher end cameras. This is why these relative speeds are known as 180 degree shutter. At least things are now better than when I started shooting Standard 8mm cine which IIRC offered choices of 9, 12, or 18 fps. I seem to remember shooting in the middle mostly, to balance quality with running time, especially as with Standard 8 your 50' of film was achieved by running a 25' length of 16mm film through the camera in opposite directions, splitting it in half during processing, and splicing the two halves together. I recall that the full 50' gave a run time of about three and a half minutes. So modern DSLR video, with 60fps, and a single take of 30 minutes seems like real luxury in comparison. With 8mm cine it was an exposure of 1/18, 1/24 or 1/36s, but the Kodachrome cine film we used was only ASA/ISO 40, yes 40 not 400, so the usual problem was getting enough light, not too much, even with an ƒ/1.4 maximum aperture.

Alan


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looked for video shooting but found nothing
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