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Thread started 06 Jan 2007 (Saturday) 19:06   
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theloanexperts
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I have a Canon 20D EOS. I want to connect my camera to a monitor to view my portrait subjects on a larger screen instead of on the tiny camera screen.

The instruction manual for my camera gives directions for connecting to a TV set. I don't want something that cumbersome in my studio.

Is there a way to connect it, either to my computer which will then dispay the image on the monitor....or....is there a way to connect it directly to a regular computer monitor without having to have the computer, keyboard, or mouse involved?

If I can connect straight to a monitor, I would probably need to get one with a video cable connection port (which I don't know if they make them like that anymore).

I would appreciate any assistance you folks can give me on the best way to do this.

Thanks!

Post #1, Jan 06, 2007 19:06:58




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Crypto
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Yes, use DPP and EOS Utility. I guess this came with the 20D as it did with my 30D.

Post #2, Jan 06, 2007 19:11:11


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pcasciola
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Remote Capture works pretty well (part of the EOS Utility set), and there are 3rd party apps like DSLR Pro that are good too. You have to use computer to control it, and the only problem is you cannot view your subject live through the monitor. You can only see the results after you take the shot. You can control many settings of the camera through the software too which is pretty cool.

Post #3, Jan 06, 2007 19:19:12


Philip Casciola
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theloanexperts
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Ok....I apologize for my ignorance. Am I to understand that I cannot connect directly to a monitor with the cable supplied or what?

I don't know what a DPP is or EOS utility or how to utilize either one for what I want to accomplish.

Basically, I just want to view my subject on the monitor (not Photoshop it or anything) to make sure I have the proper lighting, position, etc.

I want to view it on a larger screen than just the tiny one on the camera.

Can I connect my camera straight to a monitor to do this?

Thanks. And again, I apologize for my lack of knowledge with digital.

Post #4, Jan 06, 2007 20:07:52 as a reply to pcasciola's post 48 minutes earlier.




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gryphonslair99
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Sounds like you are wanting to preview the photo before taking it. With a DSLR you can not do that. Any SLR camera, including DSLR cameras, has a mirror infront of the sensor that reflects what is seen by the lens up to the view finder where you can then see and compose your photograph. That is the heart of the single lens reflex (SLR) system. This mirror blocks the sensor until you press the shutter. At that point, the shutter moves out of the way and the sensor or film can then record the image as the shutter moves out of the way, before the shutter closes and the mirror return to it's proper position infront of the sensor.

A DSLR will not act like a Point and Shoot camera.

If you are wanting to just view the photo after the shot has been taken, get a small LCD tv/monitor. You will also probably find it a lot easier to learn about the DPP and EOS Utility software. There are many useful functions in both.

Post #5, Jan 06, 2007 20:20:52 as a reply to theloanexperts's post 13 minutes earlier.


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theloanexperts
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Ok..I think I understand. Now my question is...If I want to view the shot AFTER it is taken, on a monitor. Can I connect my camera directly to the monitor and not use a computer to do this? If so, then I would need a monitor that has a cable video input like the end of the cable supplied with my camera...correct?

Post #6, Jan 06, 2007 20:53:11 as a reply to gryphonslair99's post 32 minutes earlier.




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Bill ­ Ng
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theloanexperts wrote in post #2500708external link
Ok..I think I understand. Now my question is...If I want to view the shot AFTER it is taken, on a monitor. Can I connect my camera directly to the monitor and not use a computer to do this? If so, then I would need a monitor that has a cable video input like the end of the cable supplied with my camera...correct?

You'll have to get an LCD TV ... they can come in relatively smaller sizes (27" is the smallest I've seen, but then again I've never looked for anything smaller). A regular LCD monitor will not work, no.

Bill

Post #7, Jan 06, 2007 20:57:26


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pcasciola
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You would connect the camera to a computer with the USB cable, run the EOS Utility that is included with the Canon software, and this would allow you to view images as you take them on an external monitor.

As far as I know, the only dSLR on the market today that does what you are asking (preview on an external monitor through video out) is the 20Da, which is a customized version of the 20D intended for astrophotographers.

EDIT: If you use the video out cable to a TV, you will be looking at the images in an extremely low resolution.

Post #8, Jan 06, 2007 21:01:50 as a reply to theloanexperts's post 8 minutes earlier.


Philip Casciola
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jfrancho
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I generally dislike laptops, unless the advantage of portability outweighs the negatives. Shooting portraits tethered to a laptop via the USB cable and EOS Remote Capture software is a very useful tool. It also makes great fun at parties. You will have to read the manual and install the software for this.

Post #9, Jan 06, 2007 21:17:26



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Bill ­ Ng
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People .. he's not asking about connecting to a computer, he's asking about connecting to a monitor ... just a monitor. You know that cable they include with your camera to connect it to a TV .. he wants to connect to a monitor.

Bill

Post #10, Jan 06, 2007 21:44:00 as a reply to jfrancho's post 26 minutes earlier.


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jfrancho
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No kidding - asked and answered. What he wants can't be done. Is there a problem with posting related information for the OP's benefit?

Post #11, Jan 06, 2007 21:51:43



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pcasciola
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The OP asked about displaying on a monitor. A monitor is not a TV. Using the video out with the video cable is meant to be hooked to a TV. To view images after they are shot on a monitor, you must use the USB cable to a computer, and the EOS Utility or similar 3rd party software.

Post #12, Jan 06, 2007 22:07:13 as a reply to jfrancho's post 15 minutes earlier.


Philip Casciola
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Canon 7D, EF 50/1.8, EF 85/1.8, EF 300/4L IS, EF-S 18-55, Tamron 28-75/2.8, EF 70-200/2.8L IS
Sigma 1.4x & 2x, Tamron 1.4x, Gitzo 2220 Explorer, 322RC2 grip

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wannasmaxx
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If you buy a dell 2007 wfp monitor, it has a port for RCA composite inputs. I use mine similarly. except my ps2 is hooked up to it.Pics up in a minute

Post #13, Jan 07, 2007 08:10:43 as a reply to pcasciola's post 10 hours earlier.


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SkipD
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wannasmaxx wrote in post #2502415external link
If you buy a dell 2007 wfp monitor, it has a port for RCA composite inputs. I use mine similarly. except my ps2 is hooked up to it.Pics up in a minute

Even with a high-res monitor, when the photo is converted to composite video, a lot of the resolution of the image is lost.

The best way to display images from the camera in a "live" fashion while retaining the quality of the image is to use a computer connected to the camera.

The simplest and fastest way to show images would be via a television or a monitor with composite video inputs directly connected to the camera, but you'd have to live with the much poorer resolution. For merely choosing one image over another at a shooting session, that should be acceptable.

Post #14, Jan 07, 2007 08:34:24


Skip Douglas
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pcasciola
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SkipD wrote in post #2502483external link
Even with a high-res monitor, when the photo is converted to composite video, a lot of the resolution of the image is lost.

I was thinking the same thing, but I'm still curious to see how it looks.

I wasn't aware any monitors had composite inputs, but I just remembered that any display without a tuner is referred to as a monitor.

But, yes, and NTSC's 480 interlaced lines of resolution (2 fields of 240 lines interlaced) must look pretty bad compared to a computer monitor with 1024-1200 constant lines.

Post #15, Jan 07, 2007 08:39:49


Philip Casciola
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Canon 7D, EF 50/1.8, EF 85/1.8, EF 300/4L IS, EF-S 18-55, Tamron 28-75/2.8, EF 70-200/2.8L IS
Sigma 1.4x & 2x, Tamron 1.4x, Gitzo 2220 Explorer, 322RC2 grip

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