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FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos RAW, Post Processing & Printing
Thread started 13 Nov 2008 (Thursday) 19:12
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PS and printing question

 
soxfan356
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Nov 13, 2008 19:12 |  #1

When editing a picture for printing do you resize then edit? Or edit then resize?


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Dchemist
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Nov 13, 2008 19:15 |  #2

I edit first and save the work. Sizing for the print is the last step (after sharpening).


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R ­ Hardman
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Nov 13, 2008 19:29 |  #3

Dchemist wrote in post #6681987external link
I edit first and save the work. Sizing for the print is the last step (after sharpening).

Only thing I do different is sharpen after resizing prior to sending to the printer.


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canonloader
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Nov 13, 2008 19:41 |  #4

I edit lighting, levels and so on, then resize. Noise reduction and sharpening are last, after resizing.


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Damo77
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Nov 13, 2008 20:05 |  #5

Dchemist wrote in post #6681987external link
Sizing for the print is the last step (after sharpening).

I echo what the others have said - sharpening must be done after resizing.


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-Douglas-
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Nov 13, 2008 22:43 |  #6

for me it depends on the composition, if I'm not going to use or print any part of a shot, I get rid of it first. Why muck around with all that extra data if it's not going to be used !


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Lowner
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Nov 14, 2008 11:20 |  #7

I never resize.

I always have a quick glance at the print resolution, but otherwise its sized in the printer driver. I keep my processed image without output sharpening and exactly the shape the composition needs, if that looses me a half inch of paper here and there so what?


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Joemt
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Nov 14, 2008 15:17 |  #8

From one of the photoshop tutorials I saw, ( I got 1 month free access to ps tuts
on my upgrade from PSE6 to CS3 ), it said the work flow should be:

This is not the to die for order, I don't always follow it, I'm just passing along
what I saw.

1. duplicate
2. size to final dimensions ( changing the resolution, NO RESAMPLING )
3. cropping
4. pattern removal
5. highlight shadow
6. neutrals
7. correct color key ( skin tones )
8. brightness/contrast
9. saturation
10. sharpening

Joemt.




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Damo77
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Nov 14, 2008 15:58 |  #9

Joemt wrote in post #6687463external link
2. size to final dimensions ( changing the resolution, NO RESAMPLING

This is the bit I don't agree with. I think it's very important to resize to not only the correct dimensions, but also the correct printing resolution.

As I've stated a thousand times before, good sharpening is entirely dependent on image size.


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Lowner
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Nov 15, 2008 08:46 |  #10

Damien,

You have far more knowledge than me. Am I wrong then to see what percentage the image is in the printer driver when its the size I want it, then output sharpen based on that?

All my images are 360ppi out of DPP, through Photoshop and final saving. So lets say the printer driver tells me I'm about to print at 120%, I divide 360 by 120 and multiply by 100 which gives me 300. So I use the Pixel Genius 300 sharpening routine. It sounds more complicated than it is in action.

I never save the image after output sharpening, preferring to do it afresh on each occassion.


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Damo77
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Nov 15, 2008 13:58 |  #11

Lowner wrote in post #6691567external link
You have far more knowledge than me.

Yeesh, I wouldn't say that!

Lowner wrote in post #6691567external link
Am I wrong then to see what percentage the image is in the printer driver when its the size I want it, then output sharpen based on that?

All my images are 360ppi out of DPP, through Photoshop and final saving. So lets say the printer driver tells me I'm about to print at 120%, I divide 360 by 120 and multiply by 100 which gives me 300. So I use the Pixel Genius 300 sharpening routine. It sounds more complicated than it is in action.

I confess I don't quite understand the process you've described, but it certainly sounds like you are applying sharpening specific to size, which is wise, IMO.

Lowner wrote in post #6691567external link
I never save the image after output sharpening, preferring to do it afresh on each occassion.

Yes, I do the same.


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joelham
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Nov 17, 2008 05:55 |  #12

Ahh im so unaware of sharpening!!! Is this some essential process for printing, do you huys sharpen all your images. Could someone please explain, many thanks




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canonloader
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Nov 17, 2008 06:44 |  #13

There are a couple of good ways to sharpen in CS2 and CS3. I use these variations depending on the subject matter. Some work better on one kind of image and not on others. You just have to try them and find what you like. Some, you can do twice, some you can use, then tone it down with the Edit/Fade/ tools. Sharpening is always the last thing to do though, before saving the image, no matter what technique you use.

1. Unsharp Mask. This is simple and effective. Go to Filter>Sharpen>Unsharp Mask. a panel opens with three sliders. Canon recommends using these settings. From the top down, 50.0, 0.3, 0.0. this is a nice subtle sharpening technique that you can set up a quick action for.

2. USM in LAB Color Mode. I use this one when sharpening bird images. It is quite subtle, yet does the job without leaving jaggies all over the place. Go to Image>Mode>LAB Color. Then to the Channels Palette and select the Lightness Channel. Now go to Filters>Sharpen>Unsharp Mask again and set the sliders to 45.0, 0.9, 0.0. Rather than trying to change the numbers, I will run this one twice if it needs more. If that is too much, then go to Edit>Fade Unsharp Mask and this opens a little panel with a slider. Just slide it lower while watching the image preview. Once you are done, then go back to Image>Mode>RGB Color, and your done.


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