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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Urban Life & Travel Talk
Thread started 16 Oct 2009 (Friday) 23:49
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Real estate photos with blown out windows?

 
joooowan
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Oct 16, 2009 23:49 |  #1

What is the best way to fix blown out windows during daytime real estate shots?

should i be taking shots at multiple exposures first like I do with HDR?


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FlyingPhotog
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Oct 17, 2009 00:07 |  #2

You can shoot two exposures and blend them in post or else expose for the windows and light the room accordingly.


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joooowan
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Oct 18, 2009 02:23 |  #3

i will try the multi exposure method tomorrow, see how that goes.


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s1uma1
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Oct 18, 2009 03:03 as a reply to joooowan's post |  #4

what's the best way to do that? find exposure for windows, then for room and split the difference?


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jbimages
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Oct 18, 2009 20:09 |  #5

s1uma1 wrote in post #8843508external link
what's the best way to do that? find exposure for windows, then for room and split the difference?

The (natural light) room exposure will vary depending on the number and position of windows and the size/wall colour of the room.

Use strobes to light the room to around a stop below the window exposure and expose for the window.


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NickSimcheck
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Oct 18, 2009 20:15 |  #6

Put the camera on a tripod, expose for windows then expose for room.

Import both images into Photoshop, put the "room exposure" in a layer on top of "window exposure" then selectively erase the layer to reveal the proper window exposure.

Just don't bump the tripod between exposures...


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s1uma1
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Oct 18, 2009 23:53 |  #7

NickSimcheck wrote in post #8847288external link
Put the camera on a tripod, expose for windows then expose for room.

Import both images into Photoshop, put the "room exposure" in a layer on top of "window exposure" then selectively erase the layer to reveal the proper window exposure.

Just don't bump the tripod between exposures...

would i get a similiar effect doing HDR?


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FlyingPhotog
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Oct 18, 2009 23:54 |  #8

s1uma1 wrote in post #8848629external link
would i get a similiar effect doing HDR?

In a sense, this is HDR but you want to do it without all the "grunge" looking tone mapping.


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Warl0rd
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Oct 19, 2009 07:50 as a reply to FlyingPhotog's post |  #9

you just have to tune the HDR software to make it look good.


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bunyarra
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Oct 23, 2009 06:28 as a reply to Warl0rd's post |  #10

If you are shooting multiple exposures for internal spaces, and it is daytime outside, you will find you the dynamic range huge. If you go the HDR route, make sure you spread your exposures far wider than you might otherwise. A 7-9 stop difference is quite usual.

When shooting the window for a blended exposure, I find a great method is to strobe/flash the widow frame and drapes/curtains (gelling for internal ambient). This way you spend less time cutting round the intricate details in the window zone and makes the blending v.much faster.

For most internals I shoot, they are blended exposures with a bit of fill light here and there as needed. It gives a very natural result without the artificial look that HDR can give without a great deal of care.


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Hermes
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Oct 23, 2009 06:49 |  #11

just a general tip for blending exposures. After you've taken your two frames (one exposing for the interior, the other exposing for the window), take a third frame metering for the window with a few stops of negative exposure compensation. You should get a an entirely black frame except for the window. You can then import this frame into photoshop and use it as the mask to blend the window exposure into the interior shot - no need to draw your own mask.




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TweakMDS
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Oct 23, 2009 07:09 |  #12

These are my 3 favorite options;

- Mixing exposures - usually 2 or 3 - with one for the windows, one for the room, walls etc, and another for the shadows / dark parts. I'd very lightly add some details in the shadows.
- Full blown HDR, with mild / realistic processing, like -3, -2, -1, 0 and +1 as exposures.
- Using a whole bunch of off-camera flashes (with stofens), to get the indoor exposure on par with the high as the outdoor one. You'll need 3 - 4 flashes at least and a set of radio triggers. If you plan to mix indoor lights, make sure you get some color correction gels as well - most likely 1/2 of full CTO for tungsten lights.


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Roy ­ Webber
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Oct 25, 2009 00:11 |  #13

Take a reading of the outdoor light and set this in M exp mode.

Use a flashgun, bounced off the ceiling....simple but effective.

You will of course have to adjust the flash power output depending on the size of the room.


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mathogre
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Oct 25, 2009 00:50 |  #14

jbimages wrote in post #8847243 (external link)
The (natural light) room exposure will vary depending on the number and position of windows and the size/wall colour of the room.

Use strobes to light the room to around a stop below the window exposure and expose for the window.

Roy Webber wrote in post #8889145 (external link)
Take a reading of the outdoor light and set this in M exp mode.

Use a flashgun, bounced off the ceiling....simple but effective.

You will of course have to adjust the flash power output depending on the size of the room.

Here's an example. This is our kitchen. The window faces east, and the Sun was from the southwest; it was late afternoon. I used my 430EX and bounced it off the ceiling, bumped the flash by 2/3 stop, and dropped the overall exposure by 1 stop (by changing ISO from 400 to 200). It's a single shot, modified in PP by correcting white balance. (I was in manual mode.)

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Real estate photos with blown out windows?
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