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Difference between Haze and UV?

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Thread started 19 Oct 2009 (Monday) 09:58   
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picworx
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I am a little confused between these names, I have read that a Haze or UV should always be on your lens not only for lens protection but slightly improved images?

I have also read that some folks don't even use these as the hood is protection enough?

Anyway can someone give me some advice on the difference between these 2 filters?

Thanks

Post #1, Oct 19, 2009 09:58:05



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Matthew ­ Patrick
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There is no difference. They are often called UV Haze filters and they don't filter out a lot of UV. UV filters are really just used for protection most of the time. If you really wanted to filter the UV light you might want to use a UV blocking filter, which you probably don't need to worry about yet.

There are three schools of though on this topic.
1. Always use a filter for protection. If you take this route you should probably get a high quality filter like a B+W MRC.

2. Never use a filter. UV filters DO NOT enhance image quality, in fact they tend to degrade it. If you choose not to use filters you should use a hood and you need to train yourself to always protect the front element from harm.

3. Use filters only when it's called for, so you would put one on if you're shooting under adverse conditions like rain, snow or surf.

Post #2, Oct 19, 2009 10:08:01




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Mark1
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I used to be a filter guy. But then I realized it was just another thing in the light path that has more of a chance to cause a problem than it does to help anything. And in 30 years of shooting I have never dropped a lens, nor had any accident of any kind with the front element. So the filter was nothing more then a glare and dust magnet in the way. So off it went never to return.

Filters to serve a purpose are another story. ND Grads, polarizers, etc..etc. short term filters are fine for thier purpose. But I would never keep a filter on perminatly ever again.

The front element very commonly is the cheapest one to replace on a lens. Some times as cheap as the filter some use. Certin "injuries" can actually be worse with the filter on. Such as just bumping a lens with a piece of wood while on location. The wood may not even scratch the coatings on the lens. But a thin piece of glass is now shattered and are flying at your front element. Not a pretty sight.

Sure a lens hood would have saves the situation. But that was not part of the question.

Post #3, Oct 19, 2009 10:31:43


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Difference between Haze and UV?
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