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Thread started 23 Jan 2010 (Saturday) 19:53
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STICKY: A DUMMIES STYLE TUTORIAL for editing those 5DMKII files in Adobe Premiere Pro CS4

 
Raginl3ull
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Jan 23, 2010 19:53 |  #1

Hey guys, I can't help but to have noticed that every now and then people who have recently purchased a 5DMKII pop in here and are wondering how in the hell to edit those darn video files using Adobe Premiere Pro CS4. Thus, I have created the equivalent of a "Adobe Premiere Pro CS4 + 5D MKII Editing for Dummies" style tutorial. This tutorial covers each step from beginning to end and will ensure that you get those files edited and produced while using a smooth workflow and most importantly maintaining that HD quality in the end result. If anyone has other tips they would like to add or see flaws in my process, please feel free to contribute. With that said, here we go! :D


Besides copying your video files from your memory cards to your hard drive, the first thing you must do is encode the files so that they can be best handled for preview and playback while editing them in Adobe Premiere Pro CS4.


Encoding the files in Adobe Media Encoder CS4

1. Copy .MOV files from 5DMKII onto hard drive

2. Open Adobe Media Encoder CS4

3. Add all .MOV files to Queue

4. Select all .MOV files in Queue

5. Change FORMAT to P2 Movie (.MXF extension)

6. Change PRESET to DVCPROHD 1080i 60

7. Under OUTPUT FILE, click the link and change the Save As preferences based on where and what you want to name them

8. Click START QUEUE

9. When the encoding is complete, close Adobe Media Encoder CS4


Adding your .MXF files to Adobe Premiere Pro CS4

1. Open Adobe Premiere Pro CS4

2. Click on NEW PROJECT

3. Name your Project and click OK

4. In the NEW SEQUENCE dialog box, expand DVCPROHD, expand 1080i

5. Select DVCPROHD 1080i 60i, name your SEQUENCE and press OK

6. Now you must import your files. Double click in the upper left area under your Sequence name to open the browse window

7. Browse to the folder where you ecoded them in Adobe Media Encoder CS4 (the top root folder is called CONTENTS)

8. Click on CONTENTS, then VIDEO and you will see your .MXF files

9. Select all .MXF files and click OK. This will import them into Premiere Pro



One thing you will notice right off the bat is the smooth preview of the files. Also, as you start to drag and preview the files in the timeline, you will also notice how smooth playback is. However, I encourage you to Render Entire Work Area each time you add or make changes to your timeline. This will ensure smooth preview and playback as the project progresses. Eventually you will have to render, but if you start early the time it takes to render will speed up.



Rendering your Work Area in Adobe Premiere Pro CS4

1. On the toolbar located at the top, click on SEQUENCE

2. Click on Render Entire Work Area

NOTE: If the option is grayed out, move your marker in the timeline to the beginning and repeat steps 1-2.



Once you have completed your project, it is now time to export it into a movie file for uploading to video share sites such as Youtube, Vimeo, etc. Here are the steps to export your project:



Exporting your completed project

1. In Adobe Premiere Pro CS4, on the toolbar up top click on FILE

2. Click on EXPORT, then MEDIA

3. In the EXPORT SETTINGS dialog box, under FORMAT select H.264

4. Under PRESET, select anyone of the HDTV formats that suit your needs and resolution (i.e. HDTV 1080p 24 High Quality)


NOTE: If you plan on uploading to VIMEO keep in mind that they will shrink your resolution to 1280X720 so you may want to export to this as well.


5. In the VIDEO tab on the bottom, under FRAME RATE(fps): select 23.976 or 29.97 depending on your preference. I personally use 23.976

6. Click OK, this will open Adobe Media Encoder CS4

7. In Adobe Media Encoder CS4, select your project and click on START QUEUE

8. Once the encoding has completed, close both Adobe Premiere Pro CS4 and Adobe Media Encoder CS4

9. You are now ready to play your video

NOTE: Since the video is using the H.264 format, you will not be able to play it using Quicktime. You must download VLC MEDIA PLAYER



Download, configure VLC Media Player to playback your video

1. Click on the link to download free VLC Media Player:

http://www.videolan.or​g/vlc/download-windows.htmlexternal link

2. Install VLC Media Player

3. Launch VLC Media Player

4. On the toolbar, select TOOLS then PREFERENCES

5. At the bottom left of the dialog box, click on ALL

6. Expand INPUT/CODECS, the expand OTHER CODECS

7. In the right pane, look for SKIP THE LOOP FILTER FOR H.264 and change the option to ALL

8. Click on SAVE

9. Click on MEDIA, then OPEN FILE. Browse to your video and enjoy!


The file you have created is now ready to be uploaded to all of the major video sharing sites. I have noticed that Vimeo seems a bit choppy watching all of their videos in Internet Explorer. You may want to watch them in Mozilla Firefox if that is the case. However, I noticed that Youtube does not have this problem with any browser.


Here is my latest video project edited and produced using all of the steps above:



http://vimeo.com/87573​75external link

be sure to watch in 720p HD
http://www.youtube.com​/watch?v=X9UuZQdWUEEexternal link



I hope this helps to give people some direction on how to edit their 5D Mark II files using Adobe Premiere Pro CS4. Again, if anyone has any questions, see flaws or would like to contribute please feel free to do so. Thank you all in advance!








:D


| Canon 5D Mark II + BG-E6 | Canon 7D | 24-105mm F4 L IS | 70-200mm F4 L IS| 50mm F1.4 | 28-135mm IS F3.5-56 | 430EX II | 580EX II |
http://www.flickr.com/​photos/dgatan/external link

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ChrisMc73
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Jan 23, 2010 21:36 |  #2

Very nice, thanks!




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basroil
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Jan 24, 2010 03:29 |  #3

My question: why the hell are you changing them to DVCPRO HD 1080i? DVCPRO HD only supports 1280x1080 when at 60i, that means you are throwing away 40% of the data away right there, and introducing interlacing at the same time. Any reason why you would ever want to do this unless of course you have P2 system cameras as well?


EDIT: And if you are using windows (for HD video playing, you should, vista or 7 only though), install media player classic - home cinema edition, adobe flash 10.1 (adobe labs page, currently still beta), and update directx (google direct x and you should be able to find your way there). If you are using a graphics card made in the last three years, chances are you will now be able to use DXVA for playback. DXVA offloads h264 rendering to the graphics processor instead of the CPU, which means even a very slow computer will be able to play 1080p video without skipping. With DXVA, I can watch two 1080p videos on my computer with only 4% cpu use. And NEVER use "always skip inloop deblocking" unless your computer is a core 2 duo slower than 1.8gh, or an older machine. It reduces quality, especially in video with a high number of b frames.


I don't hate macs or OSX, I hate people and statements that portray them as better than anything else. Macs are A solution, not THE solution. Get a good desktop i7 with Windows 7 and come tell me that sucks for photo or video editing.
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Raginl3ull
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Jan 24, 2010 09:28 |  #4

basroil wrote in post #9458652external link
My question: why the hell are you changing them to DVCPRO HD 1080i? DVCPRO HD only supports 1280x1080 when at 60i, that means you are throwing away 40% of the data away right there, and introducing interlacing at the same time. Any reason why you would ever want to do this unless of course you have P2 system cameras as well?


EDIT: And if you are using windows (for HD video playing, you should, vista or 7 only though), install media player classic - home cinema edition, adobe flash 10.1 (adobe labs page, currently still beta), and update directx (google direct x and you should be able to find your way there). If you are using a graphics card made in the last three years, chances are you will now be able to use DXVA for playback. DXVA offloads h264 rendering to the graphics processor instead of the CPU, which means even a very slow computer will be able to play 1080p video without skipping. With DXVA, I can watch two 1080p videos on my computer with only 4% cpu use. And NEVER use "always skip inloop deblocking" unless your computer is a core 2 duo slower than 1.8gh, or an older machine. It reduces quality, especially in video with a high number of b frames.


basroil, thank you for the info and pointing that out. I admit, I got the idea of converting them from several sources on the web from people who were experiencing the same problem. I realize that my way is probably not the best, but it does work. Now that I am aware that it strips information and introduces interlacing, what encoding (if any) and Project/Sequence settings do you recommend for optimal editing?

As the thread continues and I hear more feedback, I will update the tutorial accordingly. Thanks!


| Canon 5D Mark II + BG-E6 | Canon 7D | 24-105mm F4 L IS | 70-200mm F4 L IS| 50mm F1.4 | 28-135mm IS F3.5-56 | 430EX II | 580EX II |
http://www.flickr.com/​photos/dgatan/external link

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basroil
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Jan 24, 2010 13:56 |  #5

I'd suggest something like mpeg 2 Bluray preset at one of the true 1080p settings (23.9, 24, 25, 29.97, 30 automatically progressive) or a custom preset with mpeg 2 4:2:2 . Can't say much about the level of compression, that'll depend on your video and needs, but you should try bumping it up to 50mbps if you don't care too much about disk space and care more about quality (50mbps is about 375mb/min). Max cpu use is about 18% on my i7 920, average less than 13%.


I don't hate macs or OSX, I hate people and statements that portray them as better than anything else. Macs are A solution, not THE solution. Get a good desktop i7 with Windows 7 and come tell me that sucks for photo or video editing.
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Raginl3ull
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Jan 24, 2010 15:09 |  #6

basroil wrote in post #9461124external link
I'd suggest something like mpeg 2 Bluray preset at one of the true 1080p settings (23.9, 24, 25, 29.97, 30 automatically progressive) or a custom preset with mpeg 2 4:2:2 . Can't say much about the level of compression, that'll depend on your video and needs, but you should try bumping it up to 50mbps if you don't care too much about disk space and care more about quality (50mbps is about 375mb/min). Max cpu use is about 18% on my i7 920, average less than 13%.

Thanks again! I'll give those settings a whirl and report back with updates to the tutorial. What Sequence settings are you using in Premiere Pro with these files? I'm thinking DVCPROHD 1080i 60 isn't ideal?


| Canon 5D Mark II + BG-E6 | Canon 7D | 24-105mm F4 L IS | 70-200mm F4 L IS| 50mm F1.4 | 28-135mm IS F3.5-56 | 430EX II | 580EX II |
http://www.flickr.com/​photos/dgatan/external link

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basroil
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Jan 24, 2010 15:16 |  #7

Raginl3ull wrote in post #9461557external link
Thanks again! I'll give those settings a whirl and report back with updates to the tutorial. What Sequence settings are you using in Premiere Pro with these files? I'm thinking DVCPROHD 1080i 60 isn't ideal?

Just make a custom one. All the sequence needs to be is a general statement of what videos you're using. Make one for transcoding (1920x1080, progressive 30fps) and one for editing (whatever you decided to transcode to)


I don't hate macs or OSX, I hate people and statements that portray them as better than anything else. Macs are A solution, not THE solution. Get a good desktop i7 with Windows 7 and come tell me that sucks for photo or video editing.
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Kinky
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Jan 27, 2010 14:53 |  #8

Thanks for the tutorial!
+ Respect!
This definately helped me and made life so much easier with Premiere pro!
Now the videos don't lag when I do my work.




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Skippy29
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Jan 28, 2010 10:27 |  #9

Thanks for taking the time to put that tutorial together. It will help many of the new video people around here, myself included.


"I'm like a Slinky - not much good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you see me tumble down the stairs" -iKirst

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Richard ­ Allen ­ Crook
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Jan 31, 2010 21:53 as a reply to Skippy29's post |  #10

Hi Guys...

I thought I'd jump in here and give you my 2 cents. Naturally Adobe will tell you that uncompressed AVI is the export format of choice for further editing in Premiere. But we all know that those files are ridiculously sized...especially when looking at 1080p. Can you say overkill??

SMOOTHEST EDITING FORMAT
If you want to edit without rendering the timeline first and having virtually no stuttering, then Raginl3ull is correct, DVCPROHD is the way to go. BUT - I recommend you encode your 5d MOV files to 720p DVCPROHD. I've used the Panny P2 format (Which encodes in DVCPROHD) for years and I'll tell you, the 1080i is not worth the nearly double size. Most online video sites like vimeo only support 720 anyway. We've done extensive testing and found virtually no difference between the 1080i and 720p DVCPROHD formats.

BEST QUALITY
After more testing, we found that the MPEG2 export setting with MPEG2 multiplexing at 1080p was: 1) identical in picture quality to the original QT .MOV file, and 2) only about 12% bigger in size compared to the original MOV file (which can be altered by adjusting the bitrate). Doing it this way will ensure you don't lose any of that video data and not have to increase your file sizes too much. The issue with it, however, is that Premiere has a little bit of trouble with MPEG2...and you should render the sequence regularly. But the stuttering was really nominal in our testing and we could rest easy in a workflow that we knew would provide the best results without using up precious disk space.

After I transfer the MOV files to my computer I add all of them to Adobe Media Encoder CS4, and apply my preset titled "5dMpeg2"

Here's my encode settings:
FORMAT: Mpeg2
Multiplexing: Mpeg2
Quality: 5
Frames: 1920x1080
Rate: 30fps
Field: Progressive
Pixel Aspect: Widescreen 16:9
Bitrate: CBR, 50mbps
GOP: 3, 15
Audio Frequency: 44.1kHz, MPEG format

I'll mention that this all depends on, of course, your computer specs. We run Premiere on a humble PC with Windows XP 32bit, Dual core processor, 3 gigs ram, and a ATI Radeon graphics card (I'm not sure which one) and don't have much problems after rendering.

Richard Allen Crook
www.crookedpathfilms.c​omexternal link




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basroil
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Jan 31, 2010 23:03 |  #11

Richard Allen Crook wrote in post #9514590external link
Hi Guys...

I thought I'd jump in here and give you my 2 cents. Naturally Adobe will tell you that uncompressed AVI is the export format of choice for further editing in Premiere. But we all know that those files are ridiculously sized...especially when looking at 1080p. Can you say overkill??

SMOOTHEST EDITING FORMAT
If you want to edit without rendering the timeline first and having virtually no stuttering, then Raginl3ull is correct, DVCPROHD is the way to go. BUT - I recommend you encode your 5d MOV files to 720p DVCPROHD. I've used the Panny P2 format (Which encodes in DVCPROHD) for years and I'll tell you, the 1080i is not worth the nearly double size. Most online video sites like vimeo only support 720 anyway. We've done extensive testing and found virtually no difference between the 1080i and 720p DVCPROHD formats.

BEST QUALITY
After more testing, we found that the MPEG2 export setting with MPEG2 multiplexing at 1080p was: 1) identical in picture quality to the original QT .MOV file, and 2) only about 12% bigger in size compared to the original MOV file (which can be altered by adjusting the bitrate). Doing it this way will ensure you don't lose any of that video data and not have to increase your file sizes too much. The issue with it, however, is that Premiere has a little bit of trouble with MPEG2...and you should render the sequence regularly. But the stuttering was really nominal in our testing and we could rest easy in a workflow that we knew would provide the best results without using up precious disk space.

After I transfer the MOV files to my computer I add all of them to Adobe Media Encoder CS4, and apply my preset titled "5dMpeg2"

Here's my encode settings:
FORMAT: Mpeg2
Multiplexing: Mpeg2
Quality: 5
Frames: 1920x1080
Rate: 30fps
Field: Progressive
Pixel Aspect: Widescreen 16:9
Bitrate: CBR, 50mbps
GOP: 3, 15
Audio Frequency: 44.1kHz, MPEG format

I'll mention that this all depends on, of course, your computer specs. We run Premiere on a humble PC with Windows XP 32bit, Dual core processor, 3 gigs ram, and a ATI Radeon graphics card (I'm not sure which one) and don't have much problems after rendering.

Richard Allen Crook
www.crookedpathfilms.c​omexternal link

A good alternative is to use MPEG2 (no b frames, some programs allow no p frames) or avchd intra (no p or b frames) if you have a quad core or better system.

I personally use a variation of the "Best Quality" thing above. Twopass VBR at 50mbps (since my i7 920 will pump it out at about 2x real time even with two pass), keep the LPCM or change to AAC for audio (depending on if i actually care about it). Only have about two hours of raw video to work with though, so there may be something even better (though all of these "intra frame avi" files like neoscene or prores use mpeg variants anyway)


I don't hate macs or OSX, I hate people and statements that portray them as better than anything else. Macs are A solution, not THE solution. Get a good desktop i7 with Windows 7 and come tell me that sucks for photo or video editing.
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Raginl3ull
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Feb 01, 2010 12:02 as a reply to basroil's post |  #12

Richard Allen Cook/basroil, thank you very much for that info! Looks like we are narrowing the optimal performance/best results techniques down. As the thread grows and we received even further feedback/tips, I will update the tutorial accordingly. Thanks again guys! :D


| Canon 5D Mark II + BG-E6 | Canon 7D | 24-105mm F4 L IS | 70-200mm F4 L IS| 50mm F1.4 | 28-135mm IS F3.5-56 | 430EX II | 580EX II |
http://www.flickr.com/​photos/dgatan/external link

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Richard ­ Allen ­ Crook
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Feb 01, 2010 17:17 |  #13

Raginl3ull wrote in post #9518068external link
Richard Allen Cook/basroil, thank you very much for that info! Looks like we are narrowing the optimal performance/best results techniques down. As the thread grows and we received even further feedback/tips, I will update the tutorial accordingly. Thanks again guys! :D

I will say though....I just tried Cineform Neoscene and THAT ROCKS. $99, quickly batch converts all footage into very manageable AVI files and also installs a codec to play and edit the resulting file. The AVI file is about 15% bigger than it's replacee. The file looks like it has that strange gamma shift apparent in QT encoding...meaning it gets a little bit (and I mean a little bit) darker. Since I color in post it's not a big deal. I think I'm going to switch (and after that big post I just wrote, haha)




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basroil
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Feb 01, 2010 17:50 |  #14

Richard Allen Crook wrote in post #9520236external link
I will say though....I just tried Cineform Neoscene and THAT ROCKS. $99, quickly batch converts all footage into very manageable AVI files and also installs a codec to play and edit the resulting file. The AVI file is about 15% bigger than it's replacee. The file looks like it has that strange gamma shift apparent in QT encoding...meaning it gets a little bit (and I mean a little bit) darker. Since I color in post it's not a big deal. I think I'm going to switch (and after that big post I just wrote, haha)

That's just because you screwed up and let quicktime decode. Just change the file name to .mp4/remux (better to remux) beforehand and you'll be better off.


I don't hate macs or OSX, I hate people and statements that portray them as better than anything else. Macs are A solution, not THE solution. Get a good desktop i7 with Windows 7 and come tell me that sucks for photo or video editing.
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Richard ­ Allen ­ Crook
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Feb 01, 2010 17:53 |  #15

basroil wrote in post #9520463external link
That's just because you screwed up and let quicktime decode. Just change the file name to .mp4/remux (better to remux) beforehand and you'll be better off.

No I didn't. Read my post. I said when you convert with Cineform, it gamma-shifts the video LIKE quicktime does. Would it help to rename the resulting AVIs to .avi/remux?




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A DUMMIES STYLE TUTORIAL for editing those 5DMKII files in Adobe Premiere Pro CS4
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