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Thread started 08 Jan 2011 (Saturday) 09:48
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Best settings for fast moving objects

 
chrismid259
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Jan 08, 2011 09:48 |  #1

Hi all,
I'm new to the forum, so I don't really know if I've posted this in the correct section.

Anyway!

I've just recently purchased my first DSLR, a Canon EOS 500D. I've been playing about with some settings etc and so far love it. One problem I used to have with my old bridged camera was the ability to take perfect shots of fast moving objects without the object that I'm focusing on blurring. Mostly I take shots of trains whilst they are moving at full speed which in this country is usually either 75mph ot 125mph.

Could anyone here assist me in what settings I should use to get a perfect shot with my new camera?

Thank you in advance for any help.

Chris.


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Artem_Alf
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Jan 08, 2011 10:07 |  #2

Are you shooting in Manual or Auto mode ???


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Jan 08, 2011 10:12 |  #3

are you wanting to freeze motion or get backgroud blur(panning)? if you want to freeze the motion so it looks like its sitting still you need a fast shuter speed 1/1000 or faster? you have to play with it depending on if the wheels are stopping or not, if you want to blur the background you want somewhere around 1/60th and just follow the train as your taking your shot. as for autofocus use AI Servo


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artyman
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Jan 08, 2011 10:16 |  #4

It depends on several factors, how close you are, whether you are shooting side on, directly head on or 3/4 view, and what focal length used. As a general rule 1/1000, Aperture f8 and whatever ISO to get the correct exposure, and Servo Autofocus. You can of course alter any of the three variables of shutter aperture and ISO.

This was 1/320 f5.6 ISO800 train proably doing about 60mph

IMAGE: http://****/c3whur/Trains/IMG_3480.jpg

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Jan 08, 2011 10:26 |  #5

Andy R wrote in post #11598226 (external link)
are you wanting to freeze motion or get backgroud blur(panning)? if you want to freeze the motion so it looks like its sitting still you need a fast shuter speed 1/1000 or faster? you have to play with it depending on if the wheels are stopping or not, if you want to blur the background you want somewhere around 1/60th and just follow the train as your taking your shot. as for autofocus use AI Servo

What he said.

I would go with a slowish shutter speed to show the motion of the train, so 1/60th second would be good for me too. However, at that speed, you do need to be reasonably good with your panning. Stick the focus point on a part of the train and concentrate on keeping it on that point as you swivel (keep your feet planted and swivel at the hip with the camera braced well into your upper body). If you aren't too confident panning, then do a few at progressively different speeds until you find your comfort zone. If you just want to guarantee a shot with no motion blur, then go for a fast shutter speed, but the train will look like it's parked and not going anywhere.

There is another possible cause of the blur (it's hard to tell without seeing pics what your exact issue is - post a couple on here and we may be able to help more, leave the exif data intact so we can see what your settings were). If you are in one-shot focus mode (which may be all your bridge camera had), the camera will focus when you first half-depress the shutter button (unless you have moved focus to another button) and that distance will then be fixed. If the train then continues to move towards you until you take the shot, it will get progressively more out of focus. To avoid that, make sure you are using AI servo mode and then the camera will track the train and adjust focus continuously. Also make sure that you have just one focus point active and use that one to follow the part of the train you want in focus.




  
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chrismid259
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Jan 08, 2011 10:39 |  #6

Artem_Alf wrote in post #11598202 (external link)
Are you shooting in Manual or Auto mode ???

Manual mode.

Andy R wrote in post #11598226 (external link)
are you wanting to freeze motion or get backgroud blur(panning)? if you want to freeze the motion so it looks like its sitting still you need a fast shuter speed 1/1000 or faster? you have to play with it depending on if the wheels are stopping or not, if you want to blur the background you want somewhere around 1/60th and just follow the train as your taking your shot. as for autofocus use AI Servo

I would prefer to freeze motion - much like the example shown in artyman's post.

artyman wrote in post #11598246 (external link)
It depends on several factors, how close you are, whether you are shooting side on, directly head on or 3/4 view, and what focal length used. As a general rule 1/1000, Aperture f8 and whatever ISO to get the correct exposure, and Servo Autofocus. You can of course alter any of the three variables of shutter aperture and ISO.

As I usually stand on station platforms I'm likely to use my 18-55mm lens as they will be rather close.

I'll take the settings that have been suggested and play about with them. Unfortunatly I haven't been able to get out with my new camera yet as Amazon posted the filters out later than the camera itself - a bit annoying to say the least.

Thank you for your replies. Much appreciated.


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Gatorboy
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Jan 08, 2011 11:07 |  #7

You want to be in AI-Servo mode for sure.


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amfoto1
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Jan 08, 2011 11:32 |  #8

You know, you really don't need filters to take pictures with your camera!

The closer the moving subject is to you, the faster shutter speed you'll need to freeze motion. Bump up your ISO as needed, to allow for faster shutter speeds. Likely you'll need 1/1000 or faster. I'll assume a middle f-stop, such as f8, so on a normally sunny day you'd need ISO 250 or so, to get 1/1000. Might want to go to ISO 500, 1/1600, f8, or even faster, though. Experiment and make some notes. A big part of photography is trying things and figuring out what works and what doesn't.

You can focus manually, pre-focusing on the point where you will be taking the photo. Start panning with your subject before that (without changing your pre-set focus) and smoothly track it to the point where you take the image, continuing on past it after tripping the shutter, in a smooth panning action.

If you choose to use auto focus, yes you would want to use AI Servo. You'll need to hold the shutter release button halfway down to keep AF active as it tracks your subject. I'd manually set just the center AF point, it's the most sensitive and should give the best results. Your subject might end up "too centered", but you can crop the image a little later on in your computer.

Also do a search here about "back button focusing". That's a technique many sports/action shooters use, separating the AF function from the shutter release button for more precise control over AF.

The lens and camera's AF perfromance will both be a consideration. USM lenses, lenses with big apertures (f2.8 or larger) are generally faster focusing. Different camera models also have faster or slower AF performance.

Frankly, if it were me I'd shoot a lot of slower shutter images, too. I get kind of sick and tired of all the "frozen" sports and action images. I just think they get pretty boring after a while and prefer to mix it up, allowing for some luck or chance to slip into the process. Often when shooting a job I'll get the obligatory "frozen action" shots in the can, then start doing some things outside the box... A well done, panned image with a slower shutter speed can show an interesting rendition of speed and movement, IMO. For that sort of shooting you might want a tripod, perhaps a gimbal mount and possibly even a flash.


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Jan 08, 2011 11:53 |  #9

chrismid259 wrote in post #11598096 (external link)
Could anyone here assist me in what settings I should use to get a perfect shot with my new camera?

Settings count less than techniques. Pictures of fast-moving objects without blurring:

IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
Byte size: ZERO | Content warning: NOT AN IMAGE


IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
Byte size: ZERO | Content warning: NOT AN IMAGE


A high shutter speed helps, but the key is to accurately track the subject in the frame, right through the time you press the shutter button. You have to move with the subject, turning and moving as the subject moves. Sometimes people think shutter speed is the most important factor in stopping motion: it's not.



  
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chrismid259
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Jan 08, 2011 12:27 |  #10

amfoto1 wrote in post #11598588 (external link)
You know, you really don't need filters to take pictures with your camera!

Agreed, but I'm worried that I might stratch the lens or something like that. I'd rather scratch a filter than the actual lens.

@DC FAN, amfoto1 - Thanks for the advice.


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Jan 08, 2011 13:07 |  #11

chrismid259 wrote in post #11598856 (external link)
Agreed, but I'm worried that I might stratch the lens or something like that. I'd rather scratch a filter than the actual lens.

@DC FAN, amfoto1 - Thanks for the advice.

Lenses are MUCH MUCH more durable than that... I don't even use filters because they tend to make the image softer in my experience.


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chrismid259
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Jan 12, 2011 12:55 |  #12

Thanks all. I tried out the AI-Servo and some settings. All seemed to work quite well.

This train was doing about 70mph.
Exposure: 1/1000
Aperture: f/4.5
ISO: 500

I've provided a link to the photo. The photo is too large to upload to the forum.
http://www.flickr.com …2/sizes/l/in/ph​otostream/ (external link)


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Jan 12, 2011 13:03 |  #13

chrismid259 wrote in post #11625367 (external link)
Thanks all. I tried out the AI-Servo and some settings. All seemed to work quite well.

This train was doing about 70mph.
Exposure: 1/1000
Aperture: f/4.5
ISO: 500

I've provided a link to the photo. The photo is too large to upload to the forum.
http://www.flickr.com …2/sizes/l/in/ph​otostream/ (external link)

Just so you'll know for the future, you can link it in using a thumbnail using the guidance here http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthre​ad.php?t=157706


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Jan 12, 2011 13:09 |  #14

chrismid259 wrote in post #11598096 (external link)
Hi all,
I'm new to the forum, so I don't really know if I've posted this in the correct section.

Anyway!

I've just recently purchased my first DSLR, a Canon EOS 500D. I've been playing about with some settings etc and so far love it. One problem I used to have with my old bridged camera was the ability to take perfect shots of fast moving objects without the object that I'm focusing on blurring. Mostly I take shots of trains whilst they are moving at full speed which in this country is usually either 75mph ot 125mph.

Could anyone here assist me in what settings I should use to get a perfect shot with my new camera?

Thank you in advance for any help.

Chris.

Welcome to forum, I have same camera.

Few examples with settings. I'm using M mode.

This one to freeze fast moving object.

IMAGE: http://lh6.ggpht.com/_hdZasF15SMc/TGILKioForI/AAAAAAAANeI/jrVw7GchcQ4/s720/2010_08_10_3343_org.JPG

Model: Canon EOS REBEL T1i
ISO: 100
Exposure: 1/2000 sec
Aperture: 4.0
Focal Length: 145mm

This one called panning.
http://en.wikipedia.or​g/wiki/Panning_(camera (external link))

IMAGE: http://lh5.ggpht.com/_hdZasF15SMc/S_yW8nSuPbI/AAAAAAAAKrE/3EEvdE4_OAI/s720/IMG_8291.JPG

Jets are 300 Mph

Model: Canon EOS REBEL T1i
ISO: 100
Exposure: 1/160 sec
Aperture: 7.1
Focal Length: 44mm

Use "back-button AF" method to have more keepers.
http://www.usa.canon.c​om …ArticleAct&arti​cleID=2286 (external link)

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chrismid259
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Jan 12, 2011 14:00 |  #15

stsva wrote in post #11625418 (external link)
Just so you'll know for the future, you can link it in using a thumbnail using the guidance here http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthre​ad.php?t=157706

Thanks for that!

kf095 wrote in post #11625453 (external link)
Welcome to forum, I have same camera.

Few examples with settings. I'm using M mode.

This one to freeze fast moving object.

QUOTED IMAGE

Model: Canon EOS REBEL T1i
ISO: 100
Exposure: 1/2000 sec
Aperture: 4.0
Focal Length: 145mm

This one called panning.
http://en.wikipedia.or​g/wiki/Panning_(camera (external link))

QUOTED IMAGE

Jets are 300 Mph

Model: Canon EOS REBEL T1i
ISO: 100
Exposure: 1/160 sec
Aperture: 7.1
Focal Length: 44mm

Use "back-button AF" method to have more keepers.
http://www.usa.canon.c​om …ArticleAct&arti​cleID=2286 (external link)

Nice shots!


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Best settings for fast moving objects
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