Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 19 Apr 2010 (Monday) 12:35
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Higher shutter speeds needed with higher resolution?

 
RDKirk
Adorama says I'm "packed."
Avatar
13,755 posts
Gallery: 3 photos
Likes: 958
Joined May 2004
Location: USA
     
May 05, 2010 18:40 |  #121

dave kadolph wrote in post #10128296 (external link)
I'm confused--this goes against the current mantra that shutter speed must increase to compensate for high MP sensors. :confused:

You haven't read the thread; that "current mantra" is flat wrong.

You only have to increase shutter speed if you plan to start making bigger enlargements. If your enlargement size does not increase, your shutter speed does not have to increase.

Greater enlargement size requires a higher shutter speed regardless of resolution. For any camera, if you print to greater sizes, you will need a faster shutter speed. That's because printing larger increases the visible size of the blur.

People who are logic-challenged will enlarge a higher resolution image more than they did their lower resolution images, see more blur, and think that it's because of the higher resolution when it's really because of the higher enlargement.

They also don't realize that because the pixel size of their monitors is fixed, when they view a smaller camera sensor pixel at 100% of the monitor's pixel resolution, they're looking at a greater enlargement of the image than when they look at a larger camera sensor pixel at 100% of the monitor's pixel resolution. Greater image enlargement means greater visible motion blur--greater resolution has nothing to do with it and needs no "compensation" for anything.


TANSTAAFL--The Only Unbreakable Rule in Photography

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
timberlakephoto
Member
57 posts
Joined Jul 2009
     
May 05, 2010 21:42 |  #122

RDKirk wrote in post #10128700 (external link)
People who are logic-challenged

That seemed to be the theme in this thread. Seeing people pose the same question or hokey hypothesis over & over made my brain hurt.

Well put rdkirk.

Btw, the idea that the sensor has surpassed the resolving power of the lens is laughable, one of the sillier ideas posed in here.


Shooting life above 9000 feet!

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
PixxByTango
Member
Avatar
166 posts
Joined Apr 2009
Location: Suh Van ugh, Gawja
     
May 05, 2010 22:16 as a reply to  @ timberlakephoto's post |  #123

I'm looking out my window and I can see this thread on top of the mountain that many contributors built up on top of the mole-hill which was the basis of the original question.

Canon's posting of such drivel is so that amateurs can stop calling them and asking why they can't take pics. Its the basic fix for lack of technique.

So imagine if you will... I am shooting a moving object that is traveling in excess of 140 mph at a 45 degree or greater angle and yet, with the higher resolution I can still capture a perfectly crisp Hypo-Sharp image at only 1/250 shutter speed and an aperture of f/9.

IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
MIME changed to 'text/html' | Content warning: script


Now... if you want to argue sensor size and such, go ahead. But there is no need to step up shutter speed to make up for a lack of technique. In fact... that simply just masks another problem.

I had a 1DSmkIII last year and sold it shortly after Sebring because the camera was a waste for what I am shooting. With the 21mp and full frame sensor and using my 300mm 2.8L... I would have to crop 30% of the image to get what my 7D gets at 18MP with my 70-200 2.8L lens. Pixel peep it all you like... you guys who follow my posts KNOW I do! So once the FF sensor is cropped down to achieve the same final image, I've lost 21mp down to 16mp. Like it or not... the final print image at 100% is not going to have the quality when I print it. So I got the 1DmkIV which splits the difference and damned if I didn't discover the 7D has a faster focus when shooting above F/5 aperture!! Arrrgh! Oh well... its a beast and a cannon when shooting!

Finally... the bridge between Racers and Photographers!
Check us out at:
http://www.raceshotsre​source.com (external link)

Just call me Alice...
http://www.youtube.com​/watch?v=-FucbvoFFy0 (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
itzcryptic
Goldmember
1,174 posts
Joined Sep 2006
Location: Cincinnati
     
May 05, 2010 23:04 |  #124

timberlakephoto wrote in post #10129638 (external link)
That seemed to be the theme in this thread. Seeing people pose the same question or hokey hypothesis over & over made my brain hurt.

Well put rdkirk.

Btw, the idea that the sensor has surpassed the resolving power of the lens is laughable, one of the sillier ideas posed in here.

Wouldn't it be true, at least at extremely small apertures?




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
apersson850
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
12,286 posts
Gallery: 11 photos
Likes: 410
Joined Nov 2007
Location: Traryd, Sweden
     
May 06, 2010 03:54 as a reply to  @ itzcryptic's post |  #125

At extremely small apertures, probably yes.

But even at apertures where diffraction does influence the resolution, you still get better images with a higher resolution sensor. Just not that much better as you could have, had diffraction not existed.


Anders

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
RDKirk
Adorama says I'm "packed."
Avatar
13,755 posts
Gallery: 3 photos
Likes: 958
Joined May 2004
Location: USA
     
May 06, 2010 06:33 as a reply to  @ apersson850's post |  #126

But even at apertures where diffraction does influence the resolution, you still get better images with a higher resolution sensor. Just not that much better as you could have, had diffraction not existed.

Yes. The difference is that with the higher resolution sensor, you see finer detail at the wide apertures that--because of its fineness--is susceptible to diffraction earlier...so you notice the effect of diffraction earlier because you have finer detail to lose.

However, you didn't see that detail at any aperture with the lower resolving sensor, so you didn't notice the effect of diffraction until it began removing even larger detail at smaller apertures.

But the higher resolving sensor still provides at least as much detail all the time and more detail most of the time than the lower resolving sensor.


TANSTAAFL--The Only Unbreakable Rule in Photography

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

14,076 views & 0 likes for this thread
Higher shutter speeds needed with higher resolution?
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is Mkoimb
871 guests, 255 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.