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Thread started 28 May 2010 (Friday) 18:32
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Going from gripped to non-gripped, saving space and weight

 
robscomputer
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May 28, 2010 18:32 |  #1

Since my 10D in 2005, I've always shot my DSLR's gripped. I don't have huge hands but liked the balanced feel with the larger lens and added vertical controls. Recently after I bought the 5D I took the grip off my 40D to save space and keep it in a case for backup. At first the 40D felt too small but I actually liked the smaller size since it was easier to carry. My girlfriend is now using the 40D so it fits her smaller hands much better.

For my 5D I have the grip and the RRS l-frame but I'm not sure if I go without the grip how much less shots I would get. I am thinking of buying the non-grip RRS l-frame, incase I need to keep my gear down to a minimum. Just seems like the grip adds so much more space and harder to fit in the bag.

So wondering, do many people go back to non-grip and what's their person take about a lighter camera in general? Major issues loosing the vertical controls?


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AutumnJazz
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May 28, 2010 21:37 |  #2

I don't understand grips. They add so much weight and size, and for what? Questionably better ergonomics for portrait shots? Just tilt your camera clockwise so that your right arm braces against your chest. It doesn't feel as natural at first, but it stabilizes your camera and stops you from looking like an idiot. Longer run time? Carry an extra battery.

Honestly, I think most people that use grips are just caught up in the gear and want to appear pro or something else. Photography is about photos, not cameras. Get over your gear.


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dzaneh
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May 28, 2010 21:45 |  #3

AutumnJazz wrote in post #10264611 (external link)
stops you from looking like an idiot.

yeah & have'n to bring your arm up,over & around... well that doesn't look weird at all!
lol


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Todd ­ Lambert
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May 28, 2010 21:48 |  #4

Agreed in a lot of cases, however I do like having the option of grip or no grip - which is why I use a 5D to begin with.

I also like having an additional set of controls for when I need them. I also like having the extra juice, when I go out for the night shooting long exposures - not having to worry about changing batteries is great.

It also tends to make the controls and accessing the focus ring a bit easier since it sits higher on the top of a tripod.

Lastly is just the feel. Walking around, with a camera in hand, rather than on a string, the grip makes it nicer to carry in the hand. I generally like a bigger surface area.




  
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lundgrenj
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May 28, 2010 21:49 |  #5

If I have a longer lens on or a flash in the shoe, a grip is SOOO nice to have.


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Brett
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May 28, 2010 21:51 |  #6

AutumnJazz wrote in post #10264611 (external link)
I don't understand grips. They add so much weight and size, and for what? Questionably better ergonomics for portrait shots? Just tilt your camera clockwise so that your right arm braces against your chest. It doesn't feel as natural at first, but it stabilizes your camera and stops you from looking like an idiot. Longer run time? Carry an extra battery.

Honestly, I think most people that use grips are just caught up in the gear and want to appear pro or something else. Photography is about photos, not cameras. Get over your gear.


The phrases "makes you look like an idiot" and "photography is about photos" don't jibe. I've never used a grip, but I don't knock those who do because it makes them look bad or accuse them of trying to appear pro, and I really couldn't care less how people think I look when I shoot.

The simple truth is, people used the bodies with built-in grip (1D) and realized the benefits, and so later they became available for the smaller bodies for those who choose to use them.

I know if I were shooting in portrait orientation all day long (and there are shoots that require that), I'd have a grip on my camera, without worrying about "looking like an idiot".



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krb
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May 28, 2010 21:52 |  #7

AutumnJazz wrote in post #10264611 (external link)
Honestly, I think most people that use grips are just caught up in the gear and want to appear pro or something else. Photography is about photos, not cameras. Get over your gear.

Really? It looks to me like you're the one caught up in the gear. You're so caught up in the gear that you're passing judgement on other people and their gear.


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mikekelley
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May 28, 2010 22:19 |  #8

AutumnJazz wrote in post #10264611 (external link)
I don't understand grips. They add so much weight and size, and for what? Questionably better ergonomics for portrait shots? Just tilt your camera clockwise so that your right arm braces against your chest. It doesn't feel as natural at first, but it stabilizes your camera and stops you from looking like an idiot. Longer run time? Carry an extra battery.

Honestly, I think most people that use grips are just caught up in the gear and want to appear pro or something else. Photography is about photos, not cameras. Get over your gear.

:rolleyes:

Try shooting any field sport without a grip, it gets very old. I own a 5d and a 1d3, I often take the grip off of the 5d if I want to travel light, but for any serious work the grip stays on.

Grip gives you options...options give you ideas/creativity/less stressful working conditions (seriously, shooting in portrait orientation without a grip for hours at a time lends itself to fatigue)...that gives me money.

So like I said, for any serious work I'm keeping my cameras gripped, but for just walking around and traveling light, nah.

Don't be so quick to ridicule.


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halitime
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May 28, 2010 23:31 |  #9

98% of the time the Grip is on and is the best $60 I've spent on acces.


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May 28, 2010 23:40 as a reply to  @ halitime's post |  #10

I love being able to handle the vertical orientation with a separate set of buttons. But I am looking forward to some day getting a 50D size ungripped so I don't carry so much weight into the woods.


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sonnyc
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May 29, 2010 01:10 |  #11

For those that don't use grips, what do you do with your right pinky? :D

I got the grip just to rest the pinky on ...but then I only have the permanent grip.


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FlyingPhotog
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May 29, 2010 01:17 |  #12

The mass of the grip helps balance long lenses. I've tried shooting my 5DC + 300mm f/2.8 and 500mm f/4 and I'm much steadier with the grip mounted than without.

The entire rig is too front heavy minus the grip.


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kent ­ andersen
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May 29, 2010 01:33 |  #13

For me it's just a question about money. I have no grip, and are not planing to buy any. But if someone throw a grip on me, I would keep it. But before a grip ends on my wish list I have lots of other stuff that I like to buy. New lenses, flash, tripod, kenko tubes and a new body. There is lots of gear that I want, but not a grip before the others.

I can't understand why people decide to buy a grip as the first new investment after buying a DSLR camera. There is so much other stuff that makes much more difference when shooting. The image quality, range, ISO, aparture speed, colours are not influenced by a grip.


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merp
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May 29, 2010 02:47 |  #14
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krb wrote in post #10264662 (external link)
Really? It looks to me like you're the one caught up in the gear. You're so caught up in the gear that you're passing judgement on other people and their gear.

+1

It really does make a difference to me when it comes to shooting vert. It balances nicely too. It's just my personal preference. Saves me time from switching out that extra battery too.




  
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stephen_g
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May 29, 2010 03:39 |  #15

I went from an ungripped 20D to a 1D classic, I was going to buy a grip for the 20D anyway, but this came up. It's exponentially better for me, just feels more stable and the portrait shutter button is great, though I do think that maybe the fact it's a 1D might have something to do with the reason why I love it..


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Going from gripped to non-gripped, saving space and weight
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