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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 02 Jun 2010 (Wednesday) 18:30
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Jun 03, 2010 00:09 |  #31
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They are only truly benefits,if you use them. I'd liken ignoring the histogram,as akin to shooting a card until full,then printing all the images less a cursory constructive glance.

I'm slow to poke my head in the sand,when there are options to avoid same. Immediate feedback is amongst digital's greatest advantages.




  
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JeffreyG
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Jun 03, 2010 05:06 |  #32

harcosparky wrote in post #10291799 (external link)
chimping for some reason was not needed with film.

Familiarity with equipment has always been a must.

Chimping was not available with film. This does not mean it is not useful with digital.

When I approach a scene I meter with my handheld meter and invariably I take a shot and check the historgram. I don't usually bother looking at the LCD much again after that, but the ability to check a histogram allows me to fine tune my exposure to place tones exactly where I want them in the zones.

If light appears to be changing I can often adjust very quickly by just checking the last shot I took.

Only Luddites would not use a useful tool just because it is new.


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guntoter
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Jun 03, 2010 05:17 |  #33

blueM wrote in post #10291563 (external link)
Why? What's wrong with chimping? It seems to me to be one of the most useful differences between digital and film.

+100.........totally agree.


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whitehawk
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Jun 03, 2010 05:28 |  #34

madhatter04 wrote in post #10292890 (external link)
Chimp chimp if you want to
You can leave the old days behind
'Cause if you can't point and if you can't shoot
then you're no friend of mine.

hahaha

where did I hear this song recently? I like the word substitutions... :D


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shaker69
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Jun 03, 2010 05:36 |  #35

whitehawk wrote in post #10294054 (external link)
hahaha

where did I hear this song recently? I like the word substitutions... :D

New wave 80's.:)


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RandyS
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Jun 03, 2010 05:37 |  #36

harcosparky wrote in post #10291799 (external link)
chimping for some reason was not needed with film.

Neither was fast and accurate auto focus tracking.

At least not until it was invented.




  
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yogestee
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Jun 03, 2010 09:25 |  #37

JeffreyG wrote in post #10294011 (external link)
Only Luddites would not use a useful tool just because it is new.

And Luddites will still be cooking their food on charcoal braziers and watching their movies on VHS (or Betamax) tapes..


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Invertalon
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Jun 03, 2010 09:39 |  #38

I always chimp... Nothing wrong with it. It stops mistakes like what you had happen, happen.

I don't get the "its bad to chimp" mindset... BIG advantage from film!


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hpulley
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Jun 03, 2010 09:43 |  #39

Chimping was available with film. Pros would use Polaroid backs to take proof shots and develop them instantly, then change to proper film backs once they were satisfied with their Polaroids.

35mm film cameras didn't let you do that but at the time the whole point of the single lens reflex camera was that you got to see the shot as close as possible to how it would appear before you pressed the shutter button. Exposure could be off but that's what light meters were for.

Then there was always the retake day for school photos in case people blinked...

Bracketing and multiple shots were used with film too so hopefully one of them would have the right exposure, no blinks, etc.


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mmahoney
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Jun 03, 2010 09:51 |  #40

Generally I chimp like a monkey but just very quickly for exposure as you can't really judge sharpness on an LCD. I certainly don't pre-edit or delete any files, too much time & battery drain. Just a very quick look every few dozen frames to be sure everything is on track.

But I never chimp during sports and some events as I know I'll miss something while chimping.


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th0rr
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Jun 03, 2010 11:24 as a reply to  @ mmahoney's post |  #41

Sweet Jeebus this is getting ridiculous. If you read my original post I never stated that I never chimp. All I said is that I usually try to not. I never said it was wrong or right. It is just my personal preference.

If you feel the need to or even just like to chimp, fine. More power to you. My goal was to share my mistake in not double checking my settings. Not debate the right or wrong of chimping.

Some of you take this s**t wwaaaaayyyy to personally.




  
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raylfreeman
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Jun 03, 2010 11:43 |  #42

th0rr wrote in post #10295611 (external link)
Sweet Jeebus this is getting ridiculous. If you read my original post I never stated that I never chimp. All I said is that I usually try to not. I never said it was wrong or right. It is just my personal preference.

If you feel the need to or even just like to chimp, fine. More power to you. My goal was to share my mistake in not double checking my settings. Not debate the right or wrong of chimping.

Some of you take this s**t wwaaaaayyyy to personally.

I do not think anyone took issue with whether or not one should chimp. They took issue with the post calling those who do not know their equipment incompetent and therefore have to chimp.




  
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th0rr
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Jun 03, 2010 11:54 |  #43

raylfreeman wrote in post #10295715 (external link)
I do not think anyone took issue with whether or not one should chimp. They took issue with the post calling those who do not know their equipment incompetent and therefore have to chimp.

Which post was that? I do not recall any post here calling anyone incompetent. I see posts where like minded people state their reason for not wanting to chimp but I see no name calling.




  
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tin.risky
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Jun 03, 2010 11:58 |  #44

Just to keep on topic, I had the same thing happen to me today. I was shooting my cousin's graduation and kept wondering why I kept getting a bit of handshake blur in my photos when I usually get usable photos under similar conditions. I checked the lens, and lo' and behold, the IS was accidentally switched off. It probably happened while it was being put into or taken out of my bag. Turned it on, and I was back in business. Now I have to add "IS switch" to my list of things to double check before I shoot :)




  
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th0rr
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Jun 03, 2010 11:59 |  #45

tin.risky wrote in post #10295792 (external link)
Just to keep on topic, I had the same thing happen to me today. I was shooting my cousin's graduation and kept wondering why I kept getting a bit of handshake blur in my photos when I usually get usable photos under similar conditions. I checked the lens, and lo' and behold, the IS was accidentally switched off. It probably happened while it was being put into or taken out of my bag. Turned it on, and I was back in business. Now I have to add "IS switch" to my list of things to double check before I shoot :)

Heh, you an me both.




  
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