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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Nature & Landscapes Talk 
Thread started 09 Jun 2010 (Wednesday) 17:22
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What filter to get?

 
clamber
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Jun 09, 2010 17:22 |  #1

Im getting my first DSLR, a Canon T2i and a Canon 17-55.

I think my main focus will be landscapes and nature.

I have no clue what filter to get though.

Any recommendations? I want a filter that will work well for N&L, but still usable for other genres of photography.

Thanks,
Coby




  
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isnap
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Jun 09, 2010 19:30 |  #2

CPL ;)


Ricardo.

  
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clamber
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Jun 09, 2010 19:37 |  #3

What does that stand for?

Im thinking about getting a Hoya Polarizer after seeing what it does.




  
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broadcast_techie
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Jun 09, 2010 20:59 |  #4

Circular Polariser: http://www.camerapedia​.org …zer#Circular_Po​larization (external link)
More detailed description with samples: http://www.bobatkins.c​om …technical/polar​izers.html (external link)

A CPL can produce some fantastic results, but in my experience takes a bit of practice to line it up right.




  
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neilwood32
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Jun 10, 2010 11:54 |  #5

A CPL is the only filter that you can't replicate in post processing. Especially where there is glare.

Having said that a couple of ND (neutral Density) filters can be handy for slowing shutter speeds down for getting motion blur (think moving water - waterfalls, waves etc).


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seanesopenko
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Jun 10, 2010 14:49 as a reply to  @ neilwood32's post |  #6

A graduated neutral density filter (sheet style) is a common filter I use along with the circular polarizer (threaded).

The square sheet type graduated filters can be held in front of the lens by hand, or you can get a holder that screws into the lens. The advantage of the sheet type ones is that you can slide them up & down. Some people prefer round ones out of simplicity.

I have a quick write-up on polarizers & graduated filters here: http://www.seanesopenk​o.ca …rs-and-graduated-filters/ (external link)


http://www.seanesopenk​o.ca (external link) Calgary, Canada

  
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gjl711
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Jun 10, 2010 14:53 |  #7

Cokin makes some nice filters. They have a bit of a magenta cast, but that's easily adjusted for in PP and the cost is too good to pass up.
http://www.2filter.com​/cokin/cokin.html (external link)

Check out the GND kits. Comes with 3 filters, holder and case.


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neil_r
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Jun 10, 2010 14:54 |  #8

Why do you think you need a filter?


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clamber
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Jun 10, 2010 16:40 |  #9

Why not?
The circular polarizers look like they really add a lot to shots.
And wont it help keep the actual lens clean?




  
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neilwood32
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Jun 11, 2010 07:49 |  #10

Circular polarisers arent designed for keeping lenses clean. A good cloth and a rocket blower does a far better job! In fact because the reduce the light through the lens by up to 2 stops, it generally isnt a good idea to keep them on all the time.

Grad ND's are great is you have the time, inclination and landscape for them. Because the graduation is a fixed line it can cause problems when horizons are not level (mountain ranges, cityscapes etc). Hence I tend to take 2 or 3 shots and blend them rather than use a grad ND.


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argyle
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Jun 11, 2010 08:47 |  #11

neilwood32 wrote in post #10338160 (external link)
A CPL is the only filter that you can't replicate in post processing. Especially where there is glare.

Having said that a couple of ND (neutral Density) filters can be handy for slowing shutter speeds down for getting motion blur (think moving water - waterfalls, waves etc).

As well as an ND filter...


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seanesopenko
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Jun 11, 2010 09:00 as a reply to  @ argyle's post |  #12

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The clouds are very well defined because of the circular polarizer, and the ground is properly exposed in comparison to the sky because of the graduated ND filter. Both of them are a big help.

The only post processing done in Lightroom was +12 saturation and a crop. No exposure adjustments or frame blending. It's HDR with one shot :)

The Hoya CPL was about $60 and the cokin GND with holder came to about $80. Very good value compared to buying a new lens or the like.

http://www.seanesopenk​o.ca (external link) Calgary, Canada

  
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What filter to get?
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