Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos RAW, Post Processing & Printing 
Thread started 29 Jun 2010 (Tuesday) 08:10
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Re-saving a JPEG

 
USER876
Goldmember
1,616 posts
Joined Jul 2008
     
Jun 29, 2010 08:10 |  #1

I typically save over a JPG 3 times at quality 10 during my workflow using different programs. Does this degrade the picture to a noticable extent?




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
S ­ P
Member
174 posts
Joined Oct 2006
     
Jun 29, 2010 08:26 |  #2

It shouldn't (and yes I've pixel-peeped this at 300% magnification before after 3 edits), but you should seriously consider shooting in RAW and going from one step to another in a lossless format such as TIFF or DNG if you really have that many steps in your workflow. Or try to reduce the number of steps in your workflow, or use one software package that can handle all of what you want to do rather than a bunch of separate ones.


Steve
Instagram:@canikonnomnom (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
SiriS
Member
109 posts
Joined Nov 2007
Location: Cape Town, South Africa
     
Jun 29, 2010 08:42 |  #3

USER876 wrote in post #10446547 (external link)
I typically save over a JPG 3 times at quality 10 during my workflow using different programs. Does this degrade the picture to a noticable extent?

Which programs are you using? I do everything through PSE, so it's only necessary to save the Jpg once (I use PSE's native .psd format while editing, and sometimes also keep it for later further edits if necessary).

And I always save at maximum jpg quality for archival purposes (12 in PSE's case).


Canon 550D | 15 - 85 IS | 70 - 300 IS| 35 f/2 | 50 f/1.4 | 430EX II | Canon S95
FLICKR (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
fallenangelmc666
Mostly Lurking
15 posts
Joined Jun 2010
     
Jun 29, 2010 08:47 |  #4

This thread is very helpful. That's the question I was going to ask! Just to expand, is there any specific resizing that needs to be done if the customer wants to print their own?




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
S ­ P
Member
174 posts
Joined Oct 2006
     
Jun 29, 2010 09:01 |  #5

fallenangelmc666 wrote in post #10446740 (external link)
This thread is very helpful. That's the question I was going to ask! Just to expand, is there any specific resizing that needs to be done if the customer wants to print their own?

If you know they want a particular photo at a particular print size i.e. 8x10", it'd be helpful if you could crop it to that aspect ratio for them. The only DSLR native 3:2 aspect ratio print sizes that are common are 4x6" and 8x12", but the more popular enlarged sizes tend to be more square than 3:2, such as 8x10, 11x14, or 16x20. You can set these aspect ratios in just about any post-processing program these days.


Steve
Instagram:@canikonnomnom (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
USER876
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
1,616 posts
Joined Jul 2008
     
Jun 29, 2010 09:38 as a reply to  @ S P's post |  #6

I use DPP first, import raw, sort, keep the best ones, set white balance, crop, and input sharpen (I like the sharpening better here than in lightroom).

Then I export as a jpg, full size 100% quality. Import into lightroom, Do any creative editing, saturation, curves, do any retouching where needed,etc

Then I export as another full size JPG.

Then I import to another program I have, add watermark, border, final sharpening, resize for web and save as a jpg 100%




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
dugcross
Senior Member
Avatar
876 posts
Likes: 2
Joined Jan 2008
Location: Palm Harbor, Florida
     
Jun 29, 2010 09:56 |  #7

USER876 wrote in post #10446982 (external link)
I use DPP first, import raw, sort, keep the best ones, set white balance, crop, and input sharpen (I like the sharpening better here than in lightroom).

Then I export as a jpg, full size 100% quality. Import into lightroom, Do any creative editing, saturation, curves, do any retouching where needed,etc

Then I export as another full size JPG.

Then I import to another program I have, add watermark, border, final sharpening, resize for web and save as a jpg 100%

Personally I wouldn't save it as JPG until I was actually to the point of where I was saving it for the web. Keeping it as a RAW file will give you a lot more information to work with in Lightroom alone. Plus there are some things you can't do with the file in Lightroom as a JPG that you can if it was a RAW file.


Doug Cross
Graphic Designer and Photographer
www.crossphotographics​.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Bobster
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
5,353 posts
Gallery: 2 photos
Likes: 2039
Joined May 2006
Location: Dorset, England
     
Jun 29, 2010 10:07 |  #8

ive opened and saved a JPEG file about 8 times when working on stuff in the past (magazine publication - days of Photoshop 4) without any discernible loss in quality when printed YMMV


Robert Whetton (external link) Dorset Portrait & Events Photographer | Photoshop Guru
Gear | Tweet (external link) | Insta (external link) | Ultimate Lens MA FoCal 2 (external link)| Ultimate RAW Editor C1 (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
USER876
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
1,616 posts
Joined Jul 2008
     
Jun 29, 2010 10:08 as a reply to  @ Bobster's post |  #9

I don't believe lightroom cares if it's a jpeg or raw.......you can do the same things.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
PixelMagic
Cream of the Crop
5,546 posts
Likes: 5
Joined Nov 2007
Location: Racine, WI
     
Jun 29, 2010 10:14 |  #10

Its more difficult to change the White Balance of a JPEG than RAW. I agree with dugcross, you're better off working in RAW or TIFF and saving to JPEG when finished.

USER876 wrote in post #10447129 (external link)
I don't believe lightroom cares if it's a jpeg or raw.......you can do the same things.


Gear List

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
USER876
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
1,616 posts
Joined Jul 2008
     
Jun 29, 2010 10:16 as a reply to  @ PixelMagic's post |  #11

I do the white balance from the raw in DPP (as summarized above)




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
dugcross
Senior Member
Avatar
876 posts
Likes: 2
Joined Jan 2008
Location: Palm Harbor, Florida
     
Jun 29, 2010 10:19 |  #12

USER876 wrote in post #10447129 (external link)
I don't believe lightroom cares if it's a jpeg or raw.......you can do the same things.

Lightroom will do any adjustment, except for white balance and tint, exactly the same on jpeg as on RAW. Due to the highly compressed nature of jpegs, the compressed color gamut and the low bit precision, however, jpegs will break down pretty quickly if you push them. The multitude of benefits of RAW files are well documented. Using RAW files in Lightroom you will get much more detail out of the image, especially if you tweak the sharpening settings a little. You will also get better color rendition and shadow detail and far more latitude in working with RAW files as oppsed to JPGs


Doug Cross
Graphic Designer and Photographer
www.crossphotographics​.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
PixelMagic
Cream of the Crop
5,546 posts
Likes: 5
Joined Nov 2007
Location: Racine, WI
     
Jun 29, 2010 10:22 |  #13

That's all well and good if you never change your mind or a client/AD never requests modifications.

USER876 wrote in post #10447166 (external link)
I do the white balance from the raw in DPP (as summarized above)


Gear List

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
USER876
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
1,616 posts
Joined Jul 2008
     
Jun 29, 2010 11:33 as a reply to  @ PixelMagic's post |  #14

I always have the raw file to start over if you want to.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
dugcross
Senior Member
Avatar
876 posts
Likes: 2
Joined Jan 2008
Location: Palm Harbor, Florida
     
Jun 29, 2010 12:00 |  #15

USER876 wrote in post #10447591 (external link)
I always have the raw file to start over if you want to.

I think what pixelmagic is saying is that if you adjust the white balance in Lightroom it's non-destructive. If you need to change the white balance for whatever reason you can open the file back up in LIghtroom and just change that and all of your other adjustments will stay. Whereas if you have to go back into dpp you have to go back all through the process again and do everything over.


Doug Cross
Graphic Designer and Photographer
www.crossphotographics​.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

2,684 views & 0 likes for this thread
Re-saving a JPEG
FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos RAW, Post Processing & Printing 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is jstrothe
736 guests, 221 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.