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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Astronomy & Celestial 
Thread started 18 Jul 2010 (Sunday) 10:10
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First attempt at stacking

 
silversldr
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Jul 18, 2010 10:10 |  #1

After reading everything posted the last couple of months on here I finally had some decent weather and the moon cooperated last night. I took 6 shots @3200 iso, 3.5, 15sec and ran it through DSS. I used the tutorial by A.S.I.G.N. Observatory and then inported into photoshop and came out with this shot. Unfortunately the place, normally desolate beach with almost no light pollution, I wanted to shoot was having its yearly fishing tournament and the beach was packed so I had to move a little inland and than had to deal with a steady stream of cars heading my way and all the people shooting fireworks. Anyways I would like to get some constructive criticism for things I can improve on.

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silversldr
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Jul 18, 2010 12:08 |  #2

Here is another attempt from the same night

IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
HTTP response: NOT FOUND | MIME changed to 'image/gif' | Redirected to error image by FLICKR

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Tdragone
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Jul 18, 2010 23:01 |  #3

Looks like the second shot had too long of a shutter speed; you've got eggs, not circles for stars. The first one has some light polution..

I can't wait to go camping this fall and get some dark sky shots myself.


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silversldr
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Jul 19, 2010 06:00 |  #4

Its weird. I had the same settings for both. The first one was shot at 18mm and the second at 50mm. Big difference between two short settings.


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A.S.I.G.N. ­ Observatory
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Jul 19, 2010 06:25 |  #5

The longer your focal length on a fixed tripod, the longer the eggy stars will get.

Untracked, you need to go as short FL as you can, without barrel distortion. For a lot of lenses, 14 to 16mm is about the limit without PP distortion correction.

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silversldr
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Jul 19, 2010 09:30 |  #6

Great thank you. I would like to find a cluster of stars like the one in your tutorial. I just aimed at the Milky Way and shot. Is there a reference that I can use in the field to find a more photogenic area? Also, my settings, besides the FL, is there anything else I can do better? I understand that the higher the ISO, the higher the noise but it is better for light gathering.


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Jul 19, 2010 19:14 |  #7

silversldr wrote in post #10563541 (external link)
Great thank you. I would like to find a cluster of stars like the one in your tutorial. I just aimed at the Milky Way and shot. Is there a reference that I can use in the field to find a more photogenic area? Also, my settings, besides the FL, is there anything else I can do better? I understand that the higher the ISO, the higher the noise but it is better for light gathering.

From DSS help section

Which ISO speed?
The question is common enough and the answer is simple: it doesn't matter...sort of.

In fact the ISO speed is just a setting of any DSLR, but since the CMOS or CCD chip is the same (you don't change it when changing the ISO speed, do you?) then the results are really the same.
This is not because you are using a higher ISO speed that you get more photons, it's just that the signal is more amplified (noise and all).

The good news is that you don't need to change the ISO speed to try to capture a fainter target. You just need to take longer exposures.

Of course it's a little more complicated than that since there is a good ISO speed for each DSLR.
However it depends on the characteristics of each sensor chip (readout noise and electronic noise) and is not simple to compute.
Christian Buil has computed the values for a few Canon DSLRs

DSLR Recommanded (Optimal) ISO Speed
Canon EOS 10D 400 (290)
Canon EOS 20D 1000 (1000)
Canon EOS 350D 800 (900)
Canon EOS 5D 1000 (1100)

fwiw, I use ISO 800 with my T1i when using DSS.


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silversldr
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Jul 19, 2010 22:12 |  #8

Good information. Thank you


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A.S.I.G.N. ­ Observatory
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Jul 20, 2010 00:26 |  #9

silversldr wrote in post #10563541 (external link)
Great thank you. I would like to find a cluster of stars like the one in your tutorial. I just aimed at the Milky Way and shot. Is there a reference that I can use in the field to find a more photogenic area? Also, my settings, besides the FL, is there anything else I can do better? I understand that the higher the ISO, the higher the noise but it is better for light gathering.

That area you got is the brightest and most populated part of the milky way. However, it does stretch a long way and you will get to see more of it in different orientations and times of night throughout the year as the earth tilts and moves around the sun.

I would try to get the long axis framed diagonally across the picture. That way, you get more of the interesting and colorful, bright parts in and optimise your photograph. Centre your photograph between the spout of Sagittarius (the teapot) and the tail end of Scorpius.

Baz.


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Jul 20, 2010 00:27 |  #10

To add, astrophotography is usually centre framed. If you want to include a foreground, then the rule of thirds and other compositional rules can come into play.

Baz.


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Adrena1in
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Jul 22, 2010 08:32 |  #11

silversldr wrote in post #10563541 (external link)
Great thank you. I would like to find a cluster of stars like the one in your tutorial.

Get yourself something like Stellarium or Cartes du Diel. Both free downloads, both excellent for finding where celestial objects are. I prefer Stellarium as it's prettier. You can pan around and see what objects are where at what time, then zoom in and see images of clusters and galaxies and stuff. Brilliant tool for learning your way about the skies.

Compare its output to some wide angle shots and you'll probably notice you're often capturing clusters and deep space objects and things, without even realising it! :)


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First attempt at stacking
FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Astronomy & Celestial 
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