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Thread started 23 Jul 2010 (Friday) 10:39
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My Sensor Wipe Results

 
Nevilleblack
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Jul 23, 2010 10:39 |  #1

The only white background i had was a piece of paper my son put stickers on the reverse side so thats why you see odd white and grey but the dark spots is my concern.
I had tons of junk on my sensor so I gave it a wipe but I noticed when I wiped the solution seemed to maybe be too much because it left droplets on the sensor so I gave it a second wipe again with less solution.
My concern here is at f32 on my 135L I can see these markings at the top. Is it solution from the wipe? Same with the other dots on here. Not sure why there are still dots but was told it could be the solution. I used Visible Dust wipes.


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IVIax
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Jul 23, 2010 10:54 |  #2

You don't have a white ceiling to shoot at?

Did you re-use the wipe to try to get rid of the smearing the second time? Did you use a rocket blower to remove some of the dust?

It seems like you used too much solution...


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Jim_T
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Jul 23, 2010 11:09 |  #3

What kind of wipe and what kind of solution?

When I wet clean, I use Sensor Swabs and Photosol liquid. I put a few drops of Photosol on them.. Just enough to make them damp, but not dripping wet. A couple of wipes gets the sensor sparkling clean..

I usually shoot the sky at the highest f number I can select to check for dust on the sensor. A blue sky works best, but clouds work too.




  
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SlvrScoobie
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Jul 23, 2010 11:18 |  #4

yea, thats the same crap I had left over last time i did a wet wipe on the 1Ds II.
I think the FF's are harder to get clean right because of the larger area, and the need to more accurately apply even force across the whole sensor. Also, i and now thinking that the eclipse 2 causes problems because of the addition of water. The small amount of water added was to lower the concentration of methanol, to avoid issues with the coatings on the new sensors. Turns out they don't need it, but eclipse 2 is still being used. if you add to much solution to the pad and don't drag it slowly enough the water stays on the sensor, and dries in the pattern shown above. The old 100% methanol eclipse would just evaporate, if you used a bit to much, this new stuff doesn't.




  
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Nevilleblack
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Jul 23, 2010 11:55 |  #5

No white ceiling lol and walls are colored. Clouds are dark today lol so yeah that paper was my option.

I used Visible Dust swabs with the solution but the solution didnt come with a dropper just what looked like a vial as you might get a cologne sample in. So it was hard to get out. Quite lame actually so that could have been the issue.
So wipe slower maybe and wipe with something more methanol based?

Also, how easy is it to damage the sensor? What does a damaged sensor do to photos and is it bad to wipe a sensor too much?


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SlvrScoobie
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Jul 23, 2010 12:09 |  #6

Glass (especially coated glass) is pretty tough. Take a mirror and rub it with a cotton rag. It'll take bit of work to actually scratch it unless you get some dirt / grit under the cloth.
Sure, the less exposure to physical contact the better but as long as your not cleaning it 2 times a day, your probably ok. A scratch would look like a dark or light line in all your photos. depending on severity, you probably would not notice except in "shooting clouds @ f32" shots




  
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Lowner
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Jul 23, 2010 12:39 |  #7

Thats not bad for a first (or even second) attempt. But don't reuse the swabs, use a fresh one each time.

And don't ignore the sensorpen, the sensor version of lenspen. Very cheap, its a dry clean, so cannot leave any dirty residue, instead it leaves loose dust which I remove with canned air and an Arctic Butterfly (a simple artists paintbrush static charged with the canned air is just as good and far cheaper).


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Zerimar
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Jul 23, 2010 12:42 |  #8

try a lenspen. I have been able to get rid of anything (even streaks like this) while using the lenspen's felt side thats adapted for sensor use.


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Nicholas ­ R.
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Jul 23, 2010 12:49 |  #9

Nevilleblack,

Looks to me like you spread lubricant on the sensor, that's what those lines are. If you swab it again and still have those streaks and maybe more, then it's definitely lubricant. You'll need to get a fluid that removes oil like Eclipse.

Here's a test shot you can use if you can't shoot the sky, follow the directions on the bottom:
http://www.pbase.com …l/image/9517436​3/original (external link)

Kind regards,
Nicholas
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Bill ­ Boehme
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Jul 23, 2010 17:20 |  #10

Nicholas R. wrote in post #10590223 (external link)
Nevilleblack,

Looks to me like you spread lubricant on the sensor, that's what those lines are. If you swab it again and still have those streaks and maybe more, then it's definitely lubricant. You'll need to get a fluid that removes oil like Eclipse.

Here's a test shot you can use if you can't shoot the sky, follow the directions on the bottom:
http://www.pbase.com …l/image/9517436​3/original (external link)

Kind regards,
Nicholas
www.copperhillimages.c​om (external link)

I think that Nicholas is right on. He has provided very helpful advice to me when I got my 7D. It had some lube and maybe other residue from manufacturing. Even though I had a lot of experience with sensor cleaning using the PhotographicSolutions Sensor Swabs and Eclipse fluid, the stuff on my 7D was getting my goat. I actually used up a whole box of swabs (ouch) trying to clean the sensor. I should have returned it to Canon for a cleaning. Anyway, he suggested talking to PhotographicSolutions which I did. They graciously gave me another box of swabs and some suggestions for cleaning. In my anxiousness to get rid of the lube, I was putting way too much Eclipse fluid on the swabs and the result was that the fluid was being smeared around and left trails of fluid that turned into beads that then evaporated leaving new residue patterns. It took a lot of cleanings, but once I reduced the amount of fluid to about two or three drops, the results were much better.

Here are a few other suggestions:

  • Use f/22 rather than f/32. You will see stuff at f/32 no matter how clean your sensor if you use Auto Levels in Photoshop.
  • Use a telephoto lens and fully defocus the lens. If the target is close, set it to infinity. If the target is the sky, set focus to minimum distance.
  • Use ISO 100 -- nothing higher.
  • Shoot a clear blue sky if possible. The best times are early morning or late evening because a long exposure time is better than a fast exposure
  • When shooting an image to check for sensor dust, camera shake is GOOD! Before you press the shutter start swinging the camera so that it is making a circle on an area of the sky. By doing that, a bird or plane passing by won't show up and be mistaken for sensor dust.
  • In the beginning, it may take a number of cleanings before all of the crud is removed. After that, one swab will probably do the trick.
  • My preference is to use something that does not leave a residue behind, which means Eclipse fluid. I think that you can get it from Nicholas if your local dealer does not have it.
  • There are several types of swabs, but my preference is the Sensor Swabs despite their high cost. My local dealer charges a ridiculous price for them, but I can get them from various places online for much less (Nicholas, B&H, etc.).
  • Some people use PecPads and I think that you can now get it in strips which makes it easier to handle, but still might possibly pick up contamination if you are not careful when making a pad. Some people say that they are OK while others say no. It is probably like splitting hairs when talking about the difference between Sensor Swabs and PecPads.
  • Do not obsess over every little spot. Only the big black ones can be seen under normal exposure. The light gray ones are just there to taunt you :evil:, but are harmless.
  • Do not spend all of your time shooting out-of-focus pictures of the sky. They really are not very interesting and there are actually better uses for the camera. ;)
  • Everybody that hangs out on camera forums goes through an obsessive phase of sensor cleaning before regaining their sanity. :rolleyes:

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Nicholas ­ R.
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Jul 23, 2010 18:38 as a reply to  @ Bill Boehme's post |  #11

Bill,
Your post is excellent, all great points, there's not much more I can add. However, because I've been a proponent of Eclipse and wet-cleaning for such a long time, I thought I'd come up with a "Mission Statement" that reflects the approach I take with my own camera today. Many people think the CopperHill Method is set in stone regarding Eclipse and PecPads as the first and last line of attacking dust-bunnies. But in reality, this statement clears that up:

1) Every camera's sensor is going to get chamber lubricant on it, even brand new ones, so the first objective is to get this stuff off of the sensor. This is only acheived by the use of a wet-regimen of tools such as with our CopperHill Method, there are other companies selling wet kits, too. Your first session should only be concerned with the removal of oil and not so much the elimination of dust-bunnies. Eclipse fluid is the absolute best fluid to use for this purpose.

2) Once step one is completed, you can then use either a sensor brush or pen on a daily basis if necessary to keep the dust at bay. These two dry tools are the easiest sensor cleaning tools out of them all, with the brush being even easier than the pen. Besides this, it is practically impossible to damage a sensor with them. Obviously, keeping loose dust specks off of the sensor means they won't turn into super-stuck specks. However, it will only be a matter of time before more lubricant is splattered on your sensor again, and this can only be removed with a wet-cleaning..

3) If you are a professional shooting hundreds of shots per day or thousands of shots per week, you will most likely need to wet-clean your sensor every week or two, at the minimum.

4) If you are an avid-amateur or a weekend warrior, you will probably need to wet-clean your sensor once a month or two, at the minimum.

5) Having a Wet/Dry sensor cleaning kit means you'll never have to send your camera in for cleaning, saving you $30.00 to $75.00 per cleaning. You will not have to ship (and insure) your camera to the manufacturer and be without it 7 to 14 days. With a little practice, you will be able to do a much better job removing dust and lube than the typical cleaning done by the manufacturer.

6) OUR MAIN GOAL IS TO WET-CLEAN THE SENSOR AS INFREQUENTLY AS POSSIBLE AND THE USE OF A TOP-NOTCH SENSOR BRUSH OR PEN EVERY DAY OR TWO OR JUST WHEN NEEDED MAKES THAT POSSIBLE.

Nicholas




  
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Nevilleblack
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Jul 25, 2010 09:08 |  #12

Thanks for all the help everybody!


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My Sensor Wipe Results
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