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Thread started 26 Jul 2010 (Monday) 08:26
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Manfrotto 488RC2 vs. new 498RC2

 
Nick5
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Jul 26, 2010 08:26 |  #1

Does anyone here have both the new Manfrotto ball head 498RC2 and the old reliable 488RC2?
The new is smaller and lighter which is great, however how does it perform stability wise? Thanks.


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mrCAMPO
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Jul 26, 2010 20:44 |  #2

I had the old 488RC2. I had compared them in the shop side by side (before I bought my BH55), and of course the 498 was a bit lighter with the great addition of the friction knob.

I put a 7D + 24-70L on both, and I couldn't tell the difference FWIW. The salesman also said they should support the same weight.


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Scoobs
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Jul 27, 2010 02:12 |  #3

I've just got the 498RC2 and used it for the first time today for some early morning landscape shots.

It held my 7D, grip and 70-200 2.8 with no issues in both landscape and portrait settings.

I'm very pleased with it so far. Only niggle so far is the friction knob is a bit close to the pan lock knob but then i do have big hands.


:D Stu :D

  
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Evan ­ Idler
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Jul 27, 2010 11:50 |  #4

Scoobs wrote in post #10609569 (external link)
I've just got the 498RC2 and used it for the first time today for some early morning landscape shots.

It held my 7D, grip and 70-200 2.8 with no issues in both landscape and portrait settings.

I'm very pleased with it so far. Only niggle so far is the friction knob is a bit close to the pan lock knob but then i do have big hands.

I find the same thing with the Friction Knob, but as least you can pull the plast knobs out slighty, and you can turn them around, to a new possition so that your fingers don't hit it when tightening/loosening the Pad lock. And the 498 seems to hold my Bigma and BigMOS with more stability than my old 486 did.

--Evan


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SkipD
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Jul 27, 2010 11:56 |  #5

Evan Idler wrote in post #10611888 (external link)
And the 498 seems to hold my Bigma and BigMOS with more stability than my old 486 did.

That does not surprise me one bit. I have both the 486RC2 and 488RC2, and the 486RC2 will typically drift a bit with a heavy lens mounted while the 488 does not.


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Scoobs
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Jul 28, 2010 11:22 |  #6

Evan Idler wrote in post #10611888 (external link)
I find the same thing with the Friction Knob, but as least you can pull the plast knobs out slighty, and you can turn them around, to a new possition so that your fingers don't hit it when tightening/loosening the Pad lock. And the 498 seems to hold my Bigma and BigMOS with more stability than my old 486 did.

--Evan

Excellent info, I'll try this later. Thanks


:D Stu :D

  
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TomBrooklyn
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Nov 27, 2010 06:01 as a reply to  @ Scoobs's post |  #7

How much difference does having the friction knob make?




  
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Manfrotto 488RC2 vs. new 498RC2
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