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Thread started 24 Aug 2010 (Tuesday) 21:13
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Photography as a future. Good or Bad?

 
chauncey
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Aug 25, 2010 06:16 as a reply to  @ post 10783997 |  #16

I got an idea, if your parents object to your taking photography related classes...pay for them yourself. Self payment does tend to focus the mind a bit.


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neilwood32
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Aug 25, 2010 06:33 as a reply to  @ post 10782177 |  #17

While not a pro myself, I would agree with the above posts. Go for the Business degree minoring in photography.

If you want to make a living, you need to make sure the business side is covered. A percentage often quoted in the business section in this forum is 90% business, 10% photography.

Also a business course will likely cover marketing and advertising as well as the legalities - no business will survive without a marketing plan (of some sort).


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swerv927
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Aug 25, 2010 09:09 |  #18

My suggestion is you choose a career to focus on and maybe minor in photography. Spend your spare time, developing your skills, taking small jobs here and there, and seeing if its possible to make it on a larger scale.

To be honest, 5-10 years ago, I would of said go for it. You didnt see many people that carried DSLRs. But recently theres just too many people out there with DSLRs, half of which know very little about photography, and can impress potential customers just by having the gear alone. People assume because you have a fancy camera, you can take great pics, and with tons of people purchasing them now, theres a flood in the supply of "photographers".

It will make it tough to sell your self, as time progresses.


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birdfromboat
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Aug 25, 2010 10:52 |  #19

25 years ago I worked in photography, and digital imaging was just a curiosity on the edge of the horizon, but we all knew it was going to mean the end of our jobs, someday ( I was working in a commercial photo lab) We were right, there is very little photo lab work being done these days, but there are as many or more people making a living with digital imaging.
I suppose now, with the advent of Pro level cameras in the 1-2.5 k range, and home printers capable of pro results at around 1-1.5k, the working pros have got to be thinking they are living on borrowed time too.
Listen to your parents, or go to work with a photographer for awhile and see what the lay of the land is. If you can't earn enough to pay for college doing it, why would you think you could pay for a family doing it?


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tkbslc
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Aug 25, 2010 11:21 |  #20

JeffreyG wrote in post #10783997 (external link)
College is extremely expensive, and I would not invest in it unless you are getting a degree in a field that requires a degree. I'd also only do this in a field where you can get an actual job with such a degree.

Examples would be engineering, finance, accounting, medicine etc.

You don't need a degree to become a photographer, and I'll point out that I can't actually imagine there being 4-years of study worth of information to be picked up.

My suggestion? Get a B.S. in business and minor in photography. The business degree will ultimately be of more use to a professional photographer as 90% of the job is figuring out how to make money taking pictures.

This was pretty much what I was going to post.


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breal101
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Aug 25, 2010 11:27 |  #21

I agree with nicksan and others who have said getting a degree in something that has a more solid future is the way to go. The OP couldn't be in a better market to test the waters in professional photography. NYC offers the most diverse market in the world, it also is saturated to the limit with photographers of every description. IMO he should only do this after building a solid foundation first.

High end technical photography isn't going away but the field will stay somewhat static while the aspirants to it will surely grow. The writing is on the wall already in some other facets of photography, they shouldn't be ignored.


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Daedalus34r
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Aug 25, 2010 12:58 |  #22

JeffreyG wrote in post #10783997 (external link)
My suggestion? Get a B.S. in business and minor in photography. The business degree will ultimately be of more use to a professional photographer as 90% of the job is figuring out how to make money taking pictures.

Excellent advice. I'm finding that it's quite easy to learn about photography on my own, through experimentation, online reading, forums, guide books, etc. It's not worth spending exorbitant sums of money for official education.

The hard part comes to marketing your skill and running the business that revolves around your photography.


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Photography as a future. Good or Bad?
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