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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Kids & Family Talk 
Thread started 23 Aug 2010 (Monday) 12:50
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How much do you focus/recompose?

 
Stacey8221
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Aug 23, 2010 12:50 |  #1

Just curious how much this method is used. I ask because I am wondering if my 24-70L is having focus problems or if it's ALL me. I am constantly disappointed with the images I am getting from it since it is on my camera (50D) 99% of the time. They just aren't crisp and clear like I see in so many photos on here. I was told that focus/recompose should solve a lot of my focus problems but for some reason I am not seeing a difference. SO now I generally just aim at the eyes and keep my fingers crossed!
Do most of you usually always focus/recompose?? Or if you do what circumstances is it usually under?
Also, is there any way to test my 24-70 without sending it in? Since I only have it and my 50mm I would hate to be without it for so long!
Here is an example from last night while we were out at the park. This was taken with my 24-70 at f/2.8, 1/640, focal length 50mm, Iso 400.....I used to think camera shake was my problem but as you can see my shutter was PLENTY fast to get rid of that and my daughter was standing completely still. I was on one shot, center point and focused right between her eyes....when you zoom in the eyes aren't in complete focus. HELP!!
While I have you here, why is photoshop telling me my images are all to large to save for web and changing them to GIF?


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Gatorboy
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Aug 24, 2010 15:09 |  #2

Focus/Recompose will cause OOF images for you are changing the distance from the lens to the original focus point -- I suggest changing your focus point so that it lands on the area you want in focus.

Also, you can't expect the images straight out of the camera to be sharp. That is what post-processing is for.

For testing your lens, you need to setup a controlled situation. This should help: http://photo.net/learn​/focustest/ (external link)


Dave Hoffmann

  
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jenabean4
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Aug 26, 2010 10:48 |  #3

I am learning about this too. The lens may be backfocusing or not focusing on the center but maybe to the bottom right or something. So it could be a lens issue and you should test it to be safe (I have never done this though). Someone told me to set a bunch of folded business cards on a diaganol and then go through and focus/take a picture of each one. If any is off then there is a problem and it needs to be serviced by canon. I have also heard that it is good to send in the camera with the lens to canon but be sure to tell them it is a lens issue - however they will make sure it is set up properly with your camera (or something like that). Again I dont know 100% I am just repeating what someone told me.

Overall I do find I have this issue too in general with focusing. If I take 100 pictures, maybe only 60 of them are in good focus. Part of it is me, or camera shake and the other part I think is canon lenses. I have heard so many complain about focusing issues so you are not alone. Also teh darker it is and the wider your aperature is, the more the camera has an issue.

Also I am not 100% inlove with my 24-70 either, where as SO many are. I like prime lenses, they are so much sharper. The 24-70 just isnt as crisp and also gets worse the further you zoom! Arghh Do you love your 50mm?


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Traci
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Aug 28, 2010 19:52 |  #4

Gatorboy wrote in post #10780179 (external link)
Focus/Recompose will cause OOF images for you are changing the distance from the lens to the original focus point -- I suggest changing your focus point so that it lands on the area you want in focus.

Also, you can't expect the images straight out of the camera to be sharp. That is what post-processing is for.

For testing your lens, you need to setup a controlled situation. This should help: http://photo.net/learn​/focustest/ (external link)

What is your post-processing consist of? Can you show us a before and after photo?


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Traci
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Aug 28, 2010 20:28 |  #5

Stacey8221 wrote in post #10772598 (external link)
While I have you here, why is photoshop telling me my images are all to large to save for web and changing them to GIF?

I almost always save a small version of my images for emailing and/or uploading. Typically I change the size to 6" wide at 72 pixels.


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Bluemist
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Aug 31, 2010 07:16 |  #6

Hmmm I personally do not like the focus recompose gig- there are alot of articles about why its not a good idea to use it as Gatorboy indicated.
Although I do expect and get sharpness straight out of camera... (except where I have botched it of course). I have NO idea if your daughter was standing still and based on what you've said why the eyes wouldn't be in focus.
A similar thing happened to me with my 50MM 1.4 recently (with three people in the shot) and the back guy and side girl were in focus but the other girl wasn't.




  
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HeleneD
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Aug 31, 2010 20:02 |  #7

I select the focus point of the area I most want in focus (eyes). Focus recompose is tough when you are shooting wide open. Not much margin for error. If you focused between her eyes. depending how close to her you were, it could be enough for her eyes to be slightly OOF


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Justiss
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Sep 03, 2010 07:59 |  #8

I also select a focus point on the eyes, I don't focus and recompose.


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caught14
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Sep 03, 2010 08:52 as a reply to  @ Justiss's post |  #9

I primarily use the center crosshair focus point on my 5D MkII, pick what I want to be in focus, and then recompose the image. The center point is the most accurate, and as long as I am careful about how much I recompose (usually very little) I don't have problems, even wide open at 1.2.

Depending on the situation, however, I will use several other methods from time to time. Sometimes I take the time to manually select the appropriate focus point and other times I use manual focus (low light usually).

I have also configured the * button on the back to be the focus trigger on one of my spare 5D's. I don't use it regularly, but it is nice in certain situations when you want to fire off multiple shots because you don't have to take the time to keep refocusing -- once you get focus you just fire away.


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jase1125
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Sep 04, 2010 16:59 |  #10

I always just choose the AF point instead of focus and recomposing. I'm already a rookie, I don't need another variable to deal with like DOF on a wide open lens.


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JayCee ­ Images
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Sep 07, 2010 23:19 as a reply to  @ jase1125's post |  #11

Focus and recomposing works well if your making a SMALL recomposing move. If your swinging your camera more than a small handful of degrees, your almost certainly going to get a OOF shot. I tend to use it alot but i understand its limitations and where too much recomposing is going to wreck the shot...its a very fine line between being in focus and missing it, especially if your working with wide open apertures. It takes much practice to know exactly how far you can push it.

When practical, ill change focus points. Sometimes, those extra few seconds can make the difference between getting or not getting a shot which is why i tend to use the focus, recompose technique a lot(sports or lots of action specifically). But if you have the time to take those extra few seconds to change the focus point, do it...the sharper pictures are worth it! ;)


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Tracy ­ Elliott
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Sep 07, 2010 23:51 |  #12

I have that same lens, the 24-70 / 2.8. And I can say that, straight out of the camera, with no processing, the area that is in focus is razor sharp. Too sharp for portraits sometimes. It will show things that most people don't want to see. I would do a quick test with something with a lot of detail, use the center focus point, a tripod etc. and run through all the apertures and then take a look on your computer and see what you get.


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TheBurningCrown
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Sep 07, 2010 23:56 |  #13

I focus and recompose all of the time.

The part of your statement that was telling was that you focused between the eyes - this tells me you don't really know how autofocus systems work. You need to focus on an area that has a lot of contrast, such as the eye itself. Also, bear in mind that the bridge of the nose is slightly forward from the eyes, and so they wouldn't be in perfect focus anyways (but they might be within the area of relatively sharp focus)!


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How much do you focus/recompose?
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